rupert brooke n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Rupert Brooke PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Rupert Brooke

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 9

Rupert Brooke - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 1180 Views
  • Uploaded on

Rupert Brooke. Pre-WW1 Poet Wealthy family, studied at Cambridge, very good looking in an English way Went on long gap year Part of the Georgian Poet group which was neo-Romantic in tone (included other poets such as Robert Graves and DH Lawrence)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Rupert Brooke


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Rupert Brooke Pre-WW1 Poet Wealthy family, studied at Cambridge, very good looking in an English way Went on long gap year Part of the Georgian Poet group which was neo-Romantic in tone (included other poets such as Robert Graves and DH Lawrence) Country weekends spent skinny dipping in local streams Returned to UK just prior to the outbreak of WW1 Joined up, but died on the way to Gallipoli from an infected insect bite; never saw the action Image source: http://aotearoasunrise.blogspot.co.nz/2012/09/tuesday-poem-1914-iv-dead-by-rupert.html

    2. The Romance of War • Before WW1, war viewed Romantically • Romantic in the tradition of Wordsworth and Coleridge (Early 19th Century) • A period of innocence, naivety • Reflected in Rupert Brooke’s series of five sonnets – Nineteen Fourteen

    3. The Romance of War • Excitement about a cause to fight for: Now, God be thanked Who has watched us with His hour, And caught our youth, and wakened us from sleeping, I. Peace Dear! of all happy in the hour, most blest II. Safety Honour has come back, as a king, to earth, And paid his subjects with a royal wage; And Nobleness walks in our ways again; And we have come into our heritage. III. The Dead

    4. The Romance of dying in battle • Death was seen as an honour; as glorious; a way to immortality Blow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead! There's none of these so lonely and poor of old, But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold. III. The Dead Their sons, they gave, their immortality III. The Dead He leaves a white Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance, A width, a shining peace, under the night. IV. The Dead A pulse in the eternal mind, no less V. The Soldier

    5. Neo-Romanticism Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,  V. The Soldier are waters blown by changing winds to laughter And lit by the rich skies, all day IV. Death

    6. Patriotism If I should die, think only this of me;    That there's some corner of a foreign field  That is for ever England. There shall be    In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;  V. The Soldier

    7. Critical Appraisal • Panned by the critics for its sentimentality: • John Lehmann referred to it as “sentimental and unrealistic”. • Robert Brainard Pearsall suggested that it had “Slightness in mass and idea” but also states that his work was “lyrical, charming and companionable”. But these critics had the benefit of a hindsight not afforded the young Brooke.

    8. Critical Appraisal • Doris Eder (among other critics) suggests that Brooke’s work reflects the mood before 1914 – “Brooke’s war sonnet perfectly captured the mood of the moment” • George Parfitt suggests, V. The Soldier became "an important document of national preparation for war." – taking advantage of the same naivety that other young men who joined up possessed.

    9. References First World War Poetry Digital Archive. (2013). Rupert Brooke. Retrieved April, 2013, from http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/education/tutorials/intro/brooke \ Flanders Fields Music. (2009). Biography of John McCrae Flanders Fields Author. Retrieved, April, 2013, from http://www.flandersfieldsmusic.com/johnmccrae-bio.html Harry Rusche. (2013). Rupert Brooke. Retrieved April, 2013, from http://www.english.emory.edu/LostPoets/Brooke.html Peddie, John. (2013). Prose & Poetry – the Story of John McCrae. Retrieved April, 2013, from http://www.firstworldwar.com/poetsandprose/mccrae_story.htm Poetry Foundation. (2013). Rupert Brooke Biography. Retrieved April, 2013, from http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/rupert-brooke