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Connect: Review your homework – take turns to explain to a partner/ table how feudalism worked and the difference between traditional feudalism and bastard feudalism. What is patronage and how is it connected to bastard feudalism?

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Connect: Review your homework –take turns to explain to a partner/ table how feudalism worked and the difference between traditional feudalism and bastard feudalism.

What is patronage and how is it connected to bastard feudalism?

the means by which the King awards titles, positions and grants of land in return for service or allegiance.

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Why was there rivalry between Gloucester and Woodvilles?

  • Learning Outcomes
  • To understand the factional rivalry in the 1480s
  • Identify reasons why rivalry became worse after 1483
  • Identify “surface” and “deeper” reasons why rivalry occurred – and to assess who was to blame
who was edward iv
Who was Edward IV?
  • Cathy Lee Britain, 1483-1529

“Edward IV, King of England, died suddenly and prematurely at Windsor castle – perhaps from a stroke, or peritonitis, or even a chill caught while on a fishing trip – in April 1483 aged only 40 years. He had enjoyed a relatively successful reign, by the standards of the day, restoring peace after the disordered period of Lancastrian rule and providing his subjects with some much needed stability. Edward IV had been a strong king after 1471, able to control the rival noble factions, but his death opened up a destructive, disastrous Yorkist family feud.”

families at war
Families at war!

Edward IV died suddenly on 9th April 1483 at the age of 40

Successful King- controlled nobility

Edward only 12

Question: Why was there rivalry between Gloucester and Woodvilles?

Read pages 10 - 13/14 of LEE, make notes relevant to Key Question.

Headings:

Edward’s death

Problems / Benefits of Woodville marriage

Edward’s upbringing

Confusing wills

Advantages for Woodvilles

Disadvantages for Richard

Richard’s ally - Buckingham

question why was there rivalry between gloucester and woodvilles
Question: Why was there rivalry between Gloucester and Woodvilles?

Review so far – surface reasons for rivalry

  • Both factions wanted control over the young King
  • Richard felt Woodvilles had too much power over young King
  • Woodvilles were “commoners”
  • Woodvilles received too much patronage
question why was there rivalry between gloucester and woodvilles1
Question: Why was there rivalry between Gloucester and Woodvilles?

Read 14 - 16/17

Was Richard Duke of Gloucester an “overmighty noble”…too powerful to rival the King?

Read and make relevant notes / ideas on

    • Richard’s life experience
    • Character and Personality
    • Positions of Power
    • Loyalty to the crown

Was Edward’s marriage fundamentally flawed?

  • Summarise problems 1-4 associated with the marriage

DEEPER reasons for rivalry

deeper ingrained tensions and rivalries
Deeper ingrained tensions and rivalries
  • Summary
  • Richard overmighty?
  • Richard fears lack of control / influence which fits his position (loyal subject and controls the entire North!! Where is his reward??)
  • Richard has witnessed brutality and treason (Clarence executed 1478)
  • Fear over lack of inheritance (death of Bedford and risk of losing Neville inheritance)
  • Richard loyal to CROWN – first instinct to “protect” it
  • The missing will – was he expecting REGENCY?

DEEPER reasons for rivalry

RICHARD

deeper ingrained tensions and rivalries1
Deeper ingrained tensions and rivalries
  • Summary
  • Woodville marriage – seriously flawed
  • Woodvilles were embarrasment to establishment
  • Resentment over position and power at Court – eg Rivers was Constable of England (one of the Great offices – did he “deserve” this patronage?
  • Caused foreign policy problems
  • Family was unpleasant at court – personal rivalries
  • There was too much influence over young Edward

DEEPER reasons for rivalry

WOODVILLES

review
Review

Question: Why was there rivalry between Gloucester and Woodvilles?

Whose fault was this rivalry?

Edward IV?

He promoted Richard and made him powerful – gave him commands, positions and power!

He patronised the huge Woodville family

He made 2 wills – confusing and lacking foresight

BUT – he didn’t have a crystal ball!!

home learning
Home Learning
  • Read Richard’s struggle for the crown
  • Highlight the methods he uses to try and push his cause
review1
Review
  • Read and analyse the extract from Philippa Gregory The White Queen which tells the story of Elizabeth Woodville

Discuss the following questions:

  • What does the extract tell us about Elizabeth Woodville?
  • What does the extract tell us about Richard Duke of Gloucester?
  • What does the extract suggest about why did Edward IV’s death open up a bitter Yorkist family feud?
  • Can we trust historical fiction as a source?
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Tudors Home LearningComplete this activity which requires you to complete a table to help you decide whether or not Edward IV was to blame for events after his death.