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Leadership development: A paradigm shift in anger management curricula . Isaac Burt Sally V. Lewis Jonathan Ohrt Tabitha Young. Purpose of Study. Look at existing anger management curricula Integrate leadership development skills into behavioral programs

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leadership development a paradigm shift in anger management curricula

Leadership development: A paradigm shift in anger management curricula

Isaac Burt

Sally V. Lewis

Jonathan Ohrt

Tabitha Young

purpose of study
Purpose of Study
  • Look at existing anger management curricula
  • Integrate leadership development skills into behavioral programs
  • Serve to act as potential change agents to reduce negative patterns of thought
  • Used to enhance productivity of marginalized populations
past research
Past Research
  • Disenfranchised students are frequently misunderstood by teachers, counselors, and peers alike (Deffenbacher, Lynch, Oetting, & Kemper, 1996)
  • Social evaluations tend to dictate how a person assesses themselves
  • Has an emphasis on self-efficacy (Bandura, 1986; 1997)
past research continued
Past Research Continued:
  • People elicit certain social responses based on attributes such as social stigma (Lerner, 1982).
  • Within marginalized populations, society responds to this populace largely depending on their social roles or status
  • This is given to them by socialization (Bandura, 1989)
methodology
Methodology
  • Participants
  • Implemented in four elementary schools across a large southeastern city
  • Thirty-two youth were referred to this program for a myriad of socially maladaptive behaviors
  • Ages ranged from 9 to 11 years
  • In the 4th or 5th grade
methodology continued
Methodology Continued:
  • Participants consisted of 20 males (65%) and 12 females (35%)
  • 59% (19) identified as Black
  • 32% (10) identified as Caucasian
  • 6% (2) identified as Mixed Race
  • 3% (1) identified as Other
methodology continued1
Methodology Continued:
  • A priori criteria was implemented
  • Done in order to eliminate certain participants from the study, so that other factors will not confound the investigation
  • Dependent variables are improvement in leadership development and self-regulation skills
methodology continued2
Methodology Continued:
  • Operationally defined-leadership development skills entails creating three core roles
  • (1) personal ownership of the environment
  • (2) teacher
  • (3) consultation
methodology continued3
Methodology Continued:
  • Independent variables were the number of sessions attended
  • Levels were either in 10 or 12 sessions
  • Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient was utilized
  • Determine if there is a relationship between number of sessions attended and perceived leadership development ability
  • Hypothesized that groups that attended longer will have a significant relationship with an increase of leadership development and self-regulation skills
procedure
Procedure
  • Self-report questionnaires were given systematically over a 7, 9 and 12 week period
  • Participants ranked themselves according to their perceived leadership and anger management skills
  • Questionnaires were administered before and after the group interventions, similar to a pre-test, post-test analysis
  • The sessions were consecutive and each lasted one hour in duration
  • The groups were comprised of eight members from four participating schools
  • Three of the schools had a 100% percent completion rate, while one had a 75% completion rate
procedure continued
Procedure Continued:
  • Participants learned activities which focused on behavioral transformation, and recognition of triggers and cues
  • Participants practiced leadership skills by teaching others in their group the same activities
  • Participants were told that they were the instructors, and that their goal was to fine tune their leadership skills with peers
procedure continued1
Procedure Continued:
  • Participants went into classrooms and taught the skills they learned to their peers
  • This allowed peers to see them in a different light
  • Helped in assisting teacher’s reexamination of their personal perceptions of the participant
  • Increased the self-image and efficacy of students
references
References
  • Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall. W. H. Freeman and Company.
  • Bandura, A. (1989). Social cognitive theory. In R. Vasta (Ed.), Annals of child development. Vol. 6. Six Theories of child development (pp. 1-60). Greenwich, CT. JAI Press.
  • Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: W. H. Freeman and Company.
  • Deffenbacher, J.L.,Lynch, R.S., Oetting,E.R.,& Kemper, C.C. (1996). Anger reduction in early adolescents. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 43(2), 149-157
  • Lerner, R.M. (1982). Children and adolescents as producers of their own development. Developmental Review, 2 (4), 342-370.