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UNIT 3, Part 3 Issues of Identity
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UNIT 3, Part 3 Issues of Identity

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  1. UNIT 3, Part 3 Issues of Identity Click the mouse button or press the space bar to continue

  2. Unit 3, Part 3 MAIN MENU Issues of Identity (pages 648–663) Click a selection title to go to the corresponding selection menu.

  3. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 648– 651) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read

  4. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Lucille Clifton Click the picture to learn about the author.

  5. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem The following poem by Lucille Clifton shows that we often identify people by how they look, not by what is inside them.

  6. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poem Before you read the poem, think about the following questions: • What visual clues do you use to judge a person? • What makes you like or dislike a person when you first meet him or her?

  7. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background Many of Clifton’s poems examine the varying roles of women in society. Our roles in life change with our age, marital status, children, and career. Our identity is often related to our roles. For example, you might have roles as child, friend, sibling, and student. You might also have roles as employee or volunteer. Some roles we choose, and some are chosen for us. For example, we choose to be a volunteer, but being the child of our parents is something we cannot choose. In this poem, poverty has given Miss Rosie a new role and a new identity.

  8. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Issues of Identity As you read this poem, notice how the identity of Miss Rosie has changed over time.

  9. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Alliteration Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginnings of words. The opening line of “Miss Rosie” is a good example of alliteration because it contains repeated w sounds. “When I watch you”

  10. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Alliteration Alliteration can help you vividly picture what an author is trying to portray. As you read, notice Clifton’s use of alliteration and its effect on the text.

  11. BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Sensory Details Sensory details are words that spark sense memories in the reader. These memories include details about the senses of taste, touch, sight, hearing, and smell. Recognizing these details can foster a deeper connection to a literary work. While reading this essay, note the sensory details that Clifton uses, as well as the senses to which they correspond.

  12. BEFORE YOU READ Analyzing Sensory Details Reading Tip: Finding Details Using a chart like the one below, record the sensory details in the poem and the senses they appeal to.

  13. READING THE SELECTION Literary Element Alliteration Read the text highlighted in purple on page 650. How is this line a good example of alliteration? Answer:It repeats the consonant s sound at the beginning of words.

  14. READING THE SELECTION Issues of Identity Read the text highlighted in tan on page 650.How does this description of Miss Rosie change her identity? Answer: It becomes positive, as she is depicted as a singularly beautiful woman.

  15. READING THE SELECTION Viewing the Art Look at the painting on page 650.How does the woman in the painting compare with your image of the speaker in the poem? With your image of the young Miss Rosie? Which characteristics are the same and which are different?

  16. READING THE SELECTION Viewing the Art Answer: The woman in the image could be a younger Miss Rosie, nicely dressed, pretty, well-groomed, confident. The older woman in the poem is sloppy, unattractive, poorly dressed, defeated.

  17. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Respond • (a) How do you feel about Miss Rosie? (b) Did you feel differently about her at the end of the poem than you did at the beginning? Explain. Answer:(a) You might be sympathetic to her plight. (b) You might think less of her before learning that she was beautiful.

  18. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) How does Clifton describe Miss Rosie in lines 9–10? (b) What does this description imply about Miss Rosie? Answer: (a) Miss Rosie sits and stares vacantly. (b) She has apparently lost touch with reality.

  19. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Recall and Interpret • (a) How does the speaker respond to Miss Rosie by the end of the poem? (b) In your opinion, what does the speaker think about Miss Rosie? Answer: (a) The speaker pays tribute to Miss Rosie. (b) Compassionate and respectful

  20. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • (a) Write a short physical description of Miss Rosie, based on the details in the poem. (b) Do you think Clifton has given you enough details to go on? Answer: (a) Descriptions will vary. (b) The descriptions are not concrete, so it is difficult to write an accurate physical description.

  21. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Analyze and Evaluate • In your opinion, does this poem present a stronger picture of Miss Rosie or of the speaker? Support your response with details from the poem. Answer: Miss Rosie

  22. AFTER YOU READ Responding and Thinking Critically Connect Issues of Identity • In what ways does this poem relate to issues of identity? Answer: With the identities of Miss Rosie: as a “bag lady” and as the Georgia Rose

  23. AFTER YOU READ Alliteration Alliteration is often used by poets who like working with the sounds of words. Although we often think of poems as only being read silently, poetry is also an oral art.

  24. AFTER YOU READ Alliteration Many poems are read aloud, and poets often enjoy reading their own poems aloud. In these cases, the sounds of the words become very important to the overall reception of the poem by the audience.

  25. AFTER YOU READ Alliteration • Where does Clifton use alliteration in this poem? Give two examples. Answer: Lines 1–2 and 12–14

  26. AFTER YOU READ Alliteration • How does Clifton’s use of alliteration enhance the use of sensory details in the poem? Answer: The alliteration and some of the sensory details are contained in the same phrases. The alliteration helps emphasize the sensory details.

  27. AFTER YOU READ Literary Criticism Ronald Baughman writes of “Miss Rosie” that “the poem... functions both as a lament for the woman destroyed and as a tribute to the new black woman who rises from the ashes of her predecessor’s destruction.”

  28. AFTER YOU READ Literary Criticism With your peers, discuss how the poem serves as both a lament and as a tribute. What do you learn about the woman who has been “destroyed”? How does the speaker “rise from the ashes”?

  29. AFTER YOU READ Analyzing Sensory Details Often an author will use sensory details to help the reader envision what the author is describing. The selection of sensory words gives the reader a positive, negative, or neutral view of the person, object, or event being described.

  30. AFTER YOU READ Analyzing Sensory Details • What do you think Clifton’s purpose was when she chose certain words to create sensory details? Answer: She wanted to describe vividly the current condition of Miss Rosie.

  31. AFTER YOU READ Analyzing Sensory Details • In support of your opinion, list three sensory details from the poem. Answer: Examples may include “wrapped up like garbage”; “surrounded by the smell/of too old potato peels”; “old man’s shoes/with the little toe cut out”; “wet brown bag of a woman.”

  32. AFTER YOU READ Practice Practice with Connotation and Denotation Decide whether the connotation of each phrase on the following slides is positive, negative, or neutral. Use a dictionary or a thesaurus if you need help.

  33. AFTER YOU READ Practice • wrapped up like garbage A. positive B. negative C. neutral

  34. AFTER YOU READ Practice • smell of too old potato peels A. positive B. negative C. neutral

  35. AFTER YOU READ Practice • little toe cut out A. positive B. negative C. neutral

  36. AFTER YOU READ Practice • wet brown bag of a woman A. positive B. negative C. neutral

  37. AFTER YOU READ Practice • used to be called the Georgia Rose A. positive B. negative C. neutral

  38. SELECTION MENU Selection Menu (pages 652– 659) Before You Read Reading the Selection After You Read

  39. BEFORE YOU READ Meet Robert Frost Click the picture to learn about the author.

  40. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poems Each of us struggles on occasion to decide upon a path to take in life. As we grow older, we may contemplate the decisions that have led to our present identities.

  41. BEFORE YOU READ Connecting to the Poems Before you read the poems, think about the following: • How have your thoughts shaped who you are? • Where do you fit in society? In the world?

  42. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background “After Apple-Picking” and “Fire and Ice” were both written early in Frost’s career. “After Apple-Picking” was written in 1914, before World War I began. Frost was living in England, where he was influenced by other poets living in the English countryside. Frost’s own experience of living on farms, such as his family’s Derry, New Hampshire farm, is evident in his poetry.

  43. BEFORE YOU READ Building Background “Fire and Ice” was written after the devastation wrought by World War I, and in the aftermath of the influenza pandemic of 1918, which took millions of lives. In his poems, he raises questions about existence and life issues affecting each of us.

  44. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Issues of Identity As you read the poems, notice the speaker in each. Decide whether the identity of the speaker changes from one poem to the next.

  45. BEFORE YOU READ Setting Purposes for Reading Assonance and Consonance Assonance is the repetition of the same or similar vowel sounds. Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds, typically within or at the end of non-rhyming words and preceded by different vowel sounds. As you read the two poems, identify the use of assonance and consonance in each.

  46. BEFORE YOU READ Clarifying Meaning An author’s meaning is not always obvious in a poem or literary work. Clarifying meaning can help you better understand what you are reading. Rereading any lines that you find confusing or challenging can help. Pay attention to end punctuation to track complete thoughts.

  47. BEFORE YOU READ Clarifying Meaning Reading Tip: Finding Alternative MeaningWhile reading, it might be useful to ask yourself what other meanings a phrase might contain. Create a chart like the one on the next slide, writing the line or phrase from the poem in the first column and an alternative meaning in the second.