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DCSD School Choice Task Force November 13, 2010 PowerPoint Presentation
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DCSD School Choice Task Force November 13, 2010

DCSD School Choice Task Force November 13, 2010

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DCSD School Choice Task Force November 13, 2010

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  1. DCSD School Choice Task ForceNovember 13, 2010

  2. An education system that maximizes choice, improves quality through competition, promotes excellence, and recognizes that the interests of students, parents and teachers are paramount. 

  3. School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation Subcommittee Lead: Ted W. Vail

  4. This Subcommittee Defines School Choice as… “School Choice in the Douglas County School District means systematically empowering families to make educated decisions about which DCSD school their children will attend based on geography and program that best fits their family’s needs.” School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  5. Term Clarification • “DCSD Schools” is inclusive of all district neighborhood, charter, magnet and alternative schools. School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  6. What we’ve learned • There is a lot more choice in the District than we first thought. • DCSD schools offer an incredibly wide selection of high-quality educational programs, student learning opportunities and activities for families • It apparently hasn’t been adequately promoted • No systemic, user-friendly consumer guide School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  7. What we’ve learned Even without knowledge of these choices or new ones, parent satisfaction is over 90% among parents responding to a recent district-wide survey. School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  8. What we’ve learned • It appears there is enough physical capacity through existing DCSD school facilities to handle demand. • Adding more capacity in some parts of the district could actually “rob Peter to pay Paul”, jeopardizing a number of schools’ viability School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  9. What we’ve learned What some of us used to think… School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  10. What we’ve learned • There seems to be an “Us vs. Them” mentality that is inwardly focused and is fragmenting DCSD. • All schools must work together to be compelling enough to keep DCSD families in the district and bring back those that have departed, and as best as possible understand why some have selected to leave School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  11. What we’ve learned • Our fiduciary responsibility to bond holders, holders of loans guaranteed by DCSD, and to taxpayers... • Need to maximize percentage of Douglas County children and youth who attend DCSD schools • Optimize usage overall of current facilities School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  12. What we’ve learned BOE’s stated desire for a level playing field for all DCSD schools as they move forward in this new dynamic environment… School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  13. What we’ve learned Our collective effort… School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  14. Recommendation #1 • DCSD should establish a BOE standing committee that strategically advises it on school autonomy, empowerment and innovation – The School Autonomy and Innovation Committee(working title – subject to change). School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  15. Recommendation #2 • Actively market what our district offers for educational choice. School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  16. Recommendation #3 • DCSD should explore and define greater levels of empowerment for DCSD schools and arm them with the responsibility and authority to shape and fulfill their missions in partnership with their School Accountability Committee (SAC) or in the case of a Charter School, their Governance Board. School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  17. Recommendation #4 To ensure ongoing financial and operational viability of all DCSD schools, before giving final approval to any proposed new schools (regardless of type), applications must include thorough feasibility studies verified by DCSD planning staff that detail what existing schools offer (including program and operational characteristics) and what need beyond that might be filled; what the demand is; and what the impact would be on enrollment and hence viability of existing schools. School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  18. Recommendation #5 The BOE should develop a definition of School Choice and market this definition as a core district and community value. An option: “School Choice in the Douglas County School District means systematically empowering families to make educated decisions about which DCSD school their children will attend based on geography and program that best fits their family’s needs.” School Autonomy, Empowerment & Innovation

  19. DCSD Home Education as School Choice Subcommittee Lead: Karin Piper

  20. Welcome and Introduction Home Education as School Choice Recommendations based on complete research report Home Education as School Choice: How DCSD can expand and improve school choice through home education. Complete reports available to DCSD Board of Education.

  21. Recommendation #1 Home Education as School Choice • Improvement in communication • Significantly improved communication through web content, mailings, and other media forms. • Internal District-wide training and communication about home education and partnership development. • Automate the registration process for ease of access and efficiency.

  22. Recommendation #2 Home Education as School Choice • Expansion of services and resources • Provide access to resources and courses with District-wide consistency. • Hearing, vision, ancillary services clearly advertised to all home educators. • Expand the home education community network (social and intellectual capital).

  23. Recommendation #3 • Strategic plan • Development of five-year strategic plan including comprehensive P-20 services which will become a model for strengthening the parent-public education relationship nationwide. Home Education as School Choice

  24. Recommendation #4 • For DCSD to build District support for its schools (including charters and partnerships) which do service home education Home Education as School Choice

  25. Implementation Strategy • Implementation Strategy • Increase support staff to 2 (two) 0.5 DCSD positions (responsibilities see full report) as of January 1, 2011. • Generate Publicly Funded Home Education Service Centers which will offset program costs (see Home Education Service Center Funding Draft). Home Education as School Choice

  26. Funding Draft Based on 1 Day per week Home Education as School Choice Per center20 students x $3,000 = $60,000Staff costs $455 per day x 36 days = $16,380Materials cost estimated @$300 per student x 20= $6,000 Monthly annual rent per center = $9,000 PER YEAR Total: $28,620 per center $28,620 x 3 centers= $85,860 (Parker, Castle Rock, Highlands Ranch) Director salary=$50,000 Grand total : $35,860

  27. Funding Draft Based on 5 x 1 Day programs per center Per center5 (20 students x $3,000) = $300,0005 (Staff costs $455 per day x 36 days) = $81,9005 (Materials cost estimated @ $300 per student x 20) = $30,000 Monthly annual rent per center = $45,000 PER YEAR Total: $143,100 per center $143,100 x 3 centers = $429,300 Director salary = $50,000 Grand total : $379,300 Home Education as School Choice

  28. Open Enrollment Reform Subcommittee Lead: Pam Benigno

  29. 2009 Inter-district Enrollment 2,538 students whose parents reside in Douglas County enrolled into other Colorado public school districts. 3,284 non-resident students enrolled into Douglas County from 47 other districts. Source: CDE 2009 Pupil Membership Data Open Enrollment Reform

  30. Web Presence Open Enrollment Reform

  31. Web Presence Open Enrollment Reform

  32. Confusing Language Open Enrollment Reform

  33. Recommendation #1 • Create a “choice” booklet in PDF format that includes all district offerings and open enrollment information. Link the booklet to the District’s website. Open Enrollment Reform

  34. Recommendation #2 • Develop website pages to provide comprehensive information about District offerings and open enrollment procedures in a parent- and choice-friendly manner. • Link from a variation of “We have Choices” prominently from the District’s main page. Open Enrollment Reform

  35. Comprehensive Information Q&A Application form Updated choice booklet Links to relevant Board policy and regulation Letter to parents about the District’s philosophy of choice Open Enrollment Reform

  36. Comprehensive InformationQ&A Enrollment window Location of application Where to submit the application Selection process/Notification Length of time the enrollment is valid Return to neighborhood school? CHSAA Transfer Rule District contact name and phone number Open Enrollment Reform

  37. Recommendation #3 • Change the tone of the Board of Education open enrollment policies to convey the Board’s support for school choice. Open Enrollment Reform

  38. Recommendation #3 The Board of Education supports an education system that maximizes choice, celebrates freedom, improves quality through competition, promotes excellence, and recognizes that the interests of students and parents are paramount. Open Enrollment Reform

  39. Recommendation #4 • Adopt Family-friendly Policies:a. Lengthen the open enrollment window b. Enable new families who move into the District during the school year to apply for open enrollment, effective for the current school year Open Enrollment Reform

  40. Recommendation #4 Open Enrollment Reform Adopt Family-friendly Policies:c. Establish a date by when a parent must be notified if his child was selectedd. Create an appeals process for open enrollment application denialse. Establish a second-round application window that operates on a “first come, first served” basis

  41. Recommendation #5 • The District should send a letter to parents annually, notifying them of the open enrollment window and directing them to the District’s website for more information. Open Enrollment Reform

  42. Contract Schools Subcommittee Lead: Doug Benevento

  43. Goal • Create a contract school program that emphasizes accountability and flexibility in order to achieve more school choice and better overall school performance. Contract Schools

  44. Principles • Approved only if value is added to the District • Held accountable for achieving goals set out in the contracts • Fill gaps in the District’s system • Have flexibility to innovate • Stakeholder input required Contract Schools

  45. Process • District evaluates educational needs that might be best offered through contract school • Issues a Request for Proposals • Gather and evaluate responses • Receive stakeholder input • Decision made by Board Contract Schools

  46. Terms • Contract would set specific, measurable outcomes against which the performance of the contract will be evaluated • Establish the payment terms • Contain termination provisions Contract Schools

  47. Option Certificates Subcommittee Lead: Charcie Russell Option Certificates

  48. Purpose • Provide greater educational choices for students and parents • Improve educational performance through competition • Obtain a high return on investment of DCSD educational spending • Close academic achievement gaps Option Certificates

  49. Option Certificate • A check, payable by the District to the parent of an Option Certificate Program student that can be used exclusively pursuant to the terms of the OCP for the sole purpose of paying the educational costs, including tuition, at an OCP non-public school. Option Certificates

  50. OCP nonpublic school • Meets the standards set forth in the Option Certificate Program, such as • Fulfills Board’s End Statements • Financial stability • Safety • Sound employment, enrollment and student conduct policies Option Certificates