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Teaching Social Understanding to Promote Positive School Culture . Webinar October 17, 2012. Julie Erdelyi, M.A. Program Manager , Communication Services at the Stern Center for Language and Learning. Supporting Social Competence, Academic Achievement & Safety. OUTCOMES.

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Teaching Social Understanding to Promote Positive School Culture


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    1. Teaching Social Understanding to Promote Positive School Culture Webinar October 17, 2012 Julie Erdelyi, M.A. Program Manager , Communication Services at the Stern Center for Language and Learning

    2. Supporting Social Competence, Academic Achievement & Safety OUTCOMES PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior DATA Supporting Decision Making SYSTEMS Supporting Staff Behavior School-wide PBS

    3. Evidence-based features of SW-PBS • Prevention • Define and teach positive social expectations. • Acknowledge positive behavior. • Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior.

    4. Evidence-based features of SW-PBS • On-going collection and use of data for decision-making. • Continuum of intensive, individual interventions. • Administrative leadership: Team based implementation (Systems that support effective practices).

    5. SWPBS IS ABOUT… *Improving classroom & school climate *Improving support*Integrating academic & for students with EBDbehavior initiatives *Decreasing reactive *Maximizing academic management achievement

    6. School- Wide Positive Behavior Support Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior. ~5% Primary Prevention: Universal systems for all students, staff and settings. ~15% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behaviors. ~80% of students

    7. Enter: Social COGNITION • Social cognition provides positive and clear behavior expectations, and teaches the WHY behind the actions. • We know that social cognitive challenges impact a students ability to access the core curriculum.

    8. Skill vs. Cognition Greeting • Skill • Look at the person • Wave and/or say “HI” • Reinforce the sequence • Cognition • Think about who is around you & decide who you want to be friendly to. • Decide how to best greet the person based on expectation and prior knowledge. • Say “Hi” (verbal or nonverbal) in whatever way is expected

    9. A Big Assumption • We assume that social knowledge is in place and that students are able to use social cognition to regulate their behavior in a group.

    10. Concepts that Support Universal Application • Important Universal Concepts • The Incredible 5 Point Scale • Hidden Curriculum

    11. Monitoring My Anxiety Level A Rating Scale for Sam 5 4 3 2 1 Forget it. My self control is zero. I need an advocate. It is pretty hard for me to control myself. I’ll need somebody safe with me or a way out in a hurry. I’m okay. But I would like somebody nearby to support me. I’m cool. No problem. I'm in complete control for at least ___minutes. I’ll even be able to help someone else.

    12. The scale can also serve as a quiet, unobtrusive reminder to the student to self monitor behavior.

    13. Vocabulary • Listening with your eyes and brain. • Brain in/Brain out • Body in/Body out • Too much/Too little/Just right • Thinking bubble/Talking bubble • Smart Guess/Wacky Guess • People files • Social Fake • ‘Thinking about you’ vs. ‘Just me’ person • “I do”, “We do” • Listen, Care, Change • Predict, Care, Change • Giving and receiving information

    14. Define School-wide Expectations for Social Behavior • Identify 3-5 expectations in short statements. • Use positive statements (what to do, not what to avoid doing) • Make them memorable!

    15. Define School-wide Expectations for Social Behavior • Be respectful • Be responsible • Be safe • Be kind • Be a friend • Be-there-be-ready • Hands and feet to self • Respect self, others, property • Follow directions of adults

    16. References • Buron, K.& Curtis, M. (2003). The Incredible 5-Point Scale: Assisting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Understanding Social Interactions and Controlling Their Emotional Responses. Shawnee Mission, KS: Autism Asperger Publishing Company.www.5pointscale.com • Delsandro, Elizabeth. (2010). We Can Make It Better! San Jose, CA: Think Social Publishing, Inc. www.socialthinking.com • Gray, C. (1994). The New Social Story Book: Illustrated Edition. Arlington, TX: Future Horizons, INC. www.thegraycenter.org. • Moreau, M.R. (2010). It’s All About the Story!: An interactive Guide Using the Story Grammar Marker For Parents and Educators of Children with Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism and Related Communication Disorders. Springfield, MA: MindWing Concepts, Inc. • Schmidt-Mertes, Gretchen. M.Ed., 2008-2011Puget Sound Autism Aspergers Support Associates Gretchenschmidt-mertes@psaasa.org