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Assessment

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  1. Assessment

  2. Why Assess • to find out what students have learned • to determine what further teaching is needed • Teachers should • plan a balanced assessment program • plan a range of assessment strategies (informal & formal) • allocate time during activities for observing students • assess regularly and keeprecords

  3. Assessment should • reflect the fact that students have different and preferred learning styles • Recognise • stages of development • individual achievement • skills gradually developed • Be recorded over time (revisit and revise)

  4. How do we assess ICT • Depends on the school you are in and its adherence to the CSF! • We should assess: • What the students can do(skills and techniques) • What students know (ideas and knowledge) • Student’s attitudes (to KLA, safety, new techniques, values & feelings) Curriculum @ Work website Assessment in Technology

  5. Assessment techniques • Observation of students • Informal observation • Checklists and notes • Watching work in progress • Systematic observation • Presentation to the class or other classes at assembly • Student demonstration of skills • Talking with students • Informal conversations • Conferences (keep a log of the conference) • Interview • Questioning • individuals • class • small group • open-ended • questionnaires (verbal, written) • Use Ongoing records • Anecdotal records • Annotated class lists • Checklists • Running record sheets • Teacher diaries and logs

  6. Assessment techniques • Student self-assessment • Prepare fill in sheets • Self-assessment formats • Group discussion • Concept mapping • Folios of work • Captions on photos • Tests • Practical • Written • Use Ongoing records • Anecdotal records • Annotated class lists • Checklists • Running record sheets • Teacher diaries and logs

  7. Keep records of • Technology process • Checklist of the four phases of the process appropriate for the level • Skills list • Knowledge list • Progress towards learning outcomes • Proforma of learning outcomes • Checklist of stages in achieving learning outcomes • Technology concepts • Checklist of technology concepts • Record of stages in the progress towards understanding concepts • Diaries • Telling stories • Listening to students’ explanations • Use Ongoing records • Anecdotal records • Annotated class lists • Checklists • Running record sheets • Teacher diaries and logs

  8. Records of practical work • Keep • Work samples • Design projects • Class projects • Photographs of work • Students’ records • Student folios • Student journals • Work in progress folders • Learning log–record in during each lesson, assess at the end of the unit • Diaries • Videotaping students at work, plays, presentation, practical work • Audiotaping of student discussions, presentations, testing students’ aural abilities

  9. Types of assessment – time-saving strategies • Stick-on notes can be useful for making immediate observations about students without the need for folders and forms. • Proformas can be made to suit activities that go on through the year. • A checklist of skills and attitudes that students gain from activities can be created and reused. • Teachers should use computers and programs that enable records to be kept efficiently

  10. Pictures of student performance • To create a balanced picture of students’ ability in Technology. • build up portfolios of student work, • keeping records of • assignment work, • systematic observation • range of other assessment strategies.

  11. Authentic assessment • A form of assessment in which students are asked to perform real-world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential knowledge and skills – JonMueller • An authentic assessment usually includes a task for students to perform and a rubric by which their performance on the task will be evaluated. Authentic Assessment Toolbox

  12. Traditional assessment • forced-choice measures • multiple-choice tests • fill-in-the-blanks • true-false • matching etc • Students typically select an answer or recall information to complete the assessment. • These tests may be standardized or teacher-created.  • They may be administered locally or statewide, or internationally Authentic Assessment Toolbox

  13. Authentic assessment • assessment drives the curriculum.  • teachers • first determine the tasks that students will perform to demonstrate their mastery, • then a curriculum is developed that will enable students to perform those tasks well, • This would include the acquisition of essential knowledge and skills.  • This has been referred to as planning backwards Authentic Assessment Toolbox

  14. Authentic assessment Traditional • Selecting a Response • Contrived • Recall/Recognition • Teacher-structured • Indirect Evidence Authentic • Performing a Task • Real-life • Construction/Application • Student-structured • Direct Evidence Authentic Assessment Toolbox

  15. Web resources • MidLink Magazine Teacher ToolsRubrics and evaluation resources • The global classroom