Unit 25 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

chill
unit 25 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Unit 25 PowerPoint Presentation
play fullscreen
1 / 58
Download Presentation
Unit 25
95 Views
Download Presentation

Unit 25

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Unit 25 Lesson 6

  2. Connections

  3. WALT • We are learning to expand our knowledge of vowel sounds, engorge ourselves in new spelling words, practice fluency, reviewing attributes, focusing on idioms, review sentence types, and utilize punctuation.

  4. WHY is this important? • Using punctuation correctly will change the sentence’s meaning.

  5. Urge Complex illegible Pondered Accident manager Exceed Large apologized Posted Parcel complicated Tangible Postmarked incentive

  6. Fluency • Turn to Fluency in the back • PAGE R15 • Give your binder to your partner and take theirs. • Each will take turns reading as many words as they can in one minutes. Their partner will write down errors and the last word on their sheets. • Using the count column – calculate the words read per minute. • Place that number on the chart on page R43 • http://www.online-stopwatch.com/large-stopwatch/

  7. Idiom focus English learners are often confused by idioms because their meanings differ from the literal meanings of the words. Because idioms such as add fuel to the fire. Students need to know the meanings of common idioms. Grab an idiom focus Fat Chance

  8. Attributes • Attributes refine meaning and build associations between words. • An attribute is a characteristic or quality, such as size, part, color, or function. • Turn to page 5 in your hardcover.

  9. AttributesPage 38-39

  10. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute

  11. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average

  12. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average Miniature

  13. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average Big Miniature

  14. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average Big Miniature Miniscule

  15. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average Big Miniature Middling Miniscule

  16. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Miniscule

  17. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Miniscule

  18. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Miniscule

  19. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule

  20. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Massive

  21. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Median Massive

  22. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Median Great Massive

  23. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Median Great Massive Giant

  24. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Little Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Median Great Massive Giant

  25. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Little Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Median Great Massive Giant Vast

  26. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Little Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Petite Median Great Massive Giant Vast

  27. AttributesPage 38-39 Minute Puny Average Big Enormous Miniature Little Middling Bulky Gigantic Miniscule Petite Median Great Massive Microscopic Giant Vast

  28. AttributesPage 38-39

  29. AttributesPage 38-39 Microscopic

  30. AttributesPage 38-39 Microscopic big

  31. AttributesPage 38-39 Microscopic big giant

  32. AttributesPage 38-39 microscopic big giant average

  33. AttributesPage 38-39 microscopic big giant average petite

  34. Sentence Types • Declarative Sentence states a fact or opinion and ends with a period. • Interrogative Sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark. • Imperative Sentence gives a command and ends with a period. • Exclamatory Sentence expresses strong emotions and ends with an exclamation mark.

  35. Page 40

  36. Page 40 .

  37. Page 40 . ?

  38. Page 40 . ? .

  39. Page 40 . ? . ?

  40. Page 40 . ? . ? !

  41. Compound Sentences • Compound Sentences are two independent clauses that are joined by a comma conjunction or semicolon. • And is used to combine similar sentences. • But is used for contrasting sentences. • Or is used when a choice is offered in the sentences. • A semicolon take the place of the comma and conjunction.

  42. Page 41

  43. Page 41 Barbara JusterEsbensen wrote an experimental poem; she combined different patterns in it.

  44. Page 41 Barbara JusterEsbensen wrote an experimental poem; she combined different patterns in it. Experimental poems generally sound like conversational talk; they do not sound like closed form poetry.

  45. Page 41 Barbara JusterEsbensen wrote an experimental poem; she combined different patterns in it. Experimental poems generally sound like conversational talk; they do not sound like closed form poetry. Hearing the poem “Circles” is not enough; it needs to be seen.

  46. Page 41 Barbara JusterEsbensen wrote an experimental poem; she combined different patterns in it. Experimental poems generally sound like conversational talk; they do not sound like closed form poetry. Hearing the poem “Circles” is not enough; it needs to be seen. My friend likes poetry by E.E. Cummings; I prefer poetry by Esbensen.

  47. Page 41 Barbara JusterEsbensen wrote an experimental poem; she combined different patterns in it. Experimental poems generally sound like conversational talk; they do not sound like closed form poetry. Hearing the poem “Circles” is not enough; it needs to be seen. My friend likes poetry by E.E. Cummings; I prefer poetry by Esbensen. Read the three poems; choose the one you like best.

  48. Circles in Nature Elements to be discussed • Thought/Theme: Universal Truth – not limited to space or time. • Forms: Closed, Open, Haiku, and Concrete

  49. Who knows if the moon’s • Listen for information about the definition of experimental poetry. • Be able to answer the following questions: • What does the moon become in the poem? • Does this poem rhyme?