slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Physical activity, Environment and Policy: The link between physical inactivity, land use patterns, and transportation PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Physical activity, Environment and Policy: The link between physical inactivity, land use patterns, and transportation

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

Physical activity, Environment and Policy: The link between physical inactivity, land use patterns, and transportation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 269 Views
  • Uploaded on

Physical activity, Environment and Policy: The link between physical inactivity, land use patterns, and transportation. Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH Assistant Professor Division of Epidemiology University of Minnesota. Costs of Inactivity, per year. $500 million (Minnesota)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Physical activity, Environment and Policy: The link between physical inactivity, land use patterns, and transportation' - chester


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Physical activity, Environment and Policy: The link between physical inactivity, land use patterns, and transportation

Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH

Assistant Professor

Division of Epidemiology

University of Minnesota

costs of inactivity per year
Costs of Inactivity, per year
  • $500 million (Minnesota)
  • $3.17 billion (New York)
  • $300 million (North Carolina)
  • $76.6 billion (United States)
slide3

1991

1995

2000

No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20%

Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991, 1995 and 2000

(*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person)

Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

slide7

Factors that influence the choice to walk for exercise or transportation

Behavioral setting (environment)

Psychosocial variables

Culture

Policy

Other

Density

Diversity

Design

Land Use Diversity and Density

Quality of Connectivity

Destination Attractiveness

Density

Connectivity

density variables
Density variables

Population Density

Housing Unit Density

Employment Density

Building Coverage

Surrounding Population Density— (e.g. density within one mile radius)

land use diversity and density
Land Use Diversity and Density

% of area as Core Business/Commercial/Public use vs. residential

Building massing

% of total land area that is commercial

Use of upper stories over retail for office/residence

% of parcels with multiple uses

Spacing of public spaces in total area

Park acreage - % of total area as park

Average park area

Number of attractive pedestrian destinations

Size of businesses (# of employees in the area)

Numbers of particular types of businesses

Distance to destinations (euclidean vs. walking distance)

destination attractiveness
Destination Attractiveness

Ability to combine trips

Building design (entries, balconies, porches, interesting architectural features)

Building orientation from pedestrian standpoint

Building Setbacks

Attractiveness of individual destinations

Attractiveness of destination ‘cluster’

Is parking between pedestrian and destination?

connectivity
Connectivity

Street patterns

Pedestrian ‘cut throughs’

Sidewalk continuity

Ability to travel to destinations without crossing an arterial

Bikeway pattern, density, and bike parking

Block size

quality of connectivity
Quality of Connectivity

Width of vehicular space on roads (# of lanes, width of lanes)

Street trees – size, existence, and distance between them

Frequency of building entries

Parallel parking on streets – preferably 7’ to 8’ wide

Speed limit

Sidewalk width greater than or less than 5’

Are pedestrian paths on streets or separate?

Bikeway pattern, density, and bike parking

Ease of street crossings

Distance between pedestrian crossings on arterials

differing reasons similar goals
Differing reasons, similar goals
  • Urban planners
  • Transportation planners
  • Public Health professionals

Decrease dependence on automobiles, increase use of public transportation, walking/biking