developed by the north carolina department of public instruction dr sherry broome regional lead n.
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Self-Evaluation Training for Better School Improvement Day 2 PowerPoint Presentation
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Self-Evaluation Training for Better School Improvement Day 2

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  1. Developed byThe North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Dr. Sherry Broome, Regional Lead • Day 2 Self-Evaluation Training for Better School Improvement Day 2

  2. The Journey. . . How will CNA help? Why are we ALL here? What is CNA? Why do we need multiple measures? Where do we find authoritative data? How can we foster change?

  3. Today our focus is to… • Review primary data sources • Look at an imaginary school’s view of itself • Determine top 3 needs for your school and use 2 tools to evaluate those needs • Create 14 sub-dimension charts

  4. Additional Key Data Sources • School schedule • Meetings with principal, teachers, students, parents • Collaborative meetings • Lesson observations • Other first hand observations – documents, the environment

  5. Additional Key Data Sources • Performance and other data about students • Documents supplied by the school • School Self-Evaluation Form • Direct observation of teaching and learning • Discussions with staff, parents, students and other stakeholders • Looking at students' work • Direct observation of the school environment and culture

  6. “When we focus only on student learning measures, we see school personnel using their time figuring out how to look better on the student learning measures. We want school personnel to use their time figuring out how to be better for all students.” Bernhardt,V. L., (1998,March). Invited Monograph No. 4.California Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (CASCD).

  7. Triangulation Direct Observation

  8. Data – SO WHAT? • What’s the impact ? • What’s the outcome ? • So what ? • How do you know ?

  9. Activity: Identifying Key Areas for Improvement In teams: Share and reflect on the concerns about your school you selected last night. Collectively identify 3 key areas for improvement Record each on a different color piece of paper

  10. So Much Data…So Little Time... • What will it tell you? • What do you need to know? • How can it help you? • Where is it found?

  11. Tells us if different groups of students are experiencing school differently Tells us student participation in different programs and processes Demographics Allows the prediction of actions/ processes/ programs that best meet the learning needs of all students School Processes Perceptions Tells us if a program is making a difference in student learning results Student Learning Tells us the impact of student perception of the learning environment on student learning

  12. Starting Data Dialogue • Are there any patterns by racial/ethnic group? By gender? • What groups are behind? What groups are on target? Ahead? • How might some school or classroom practices contribute to successes and failures? For which groups of students?

  13. Authoritative Data NC Report Card Disaggregated Report ABCs AYP Measures individual proficiency (III) & growth Data 1996 - LEA/School Growth Status Not/Expected/High Measures proficiency of student groups and reports other targets Data 2002 - State/LEA/School AYP Status Met/Not Met Reports proficiency of expanded student groups for two years Data 1996 - State/LEA/School Disaggregates specific assessments Summarizes ABCs and AYP data, AND reports school profile and teacher data Data 2001- State/LEA/School Details schools’ performance designation

  14. Authoritative Data Goal Summary EVAAS TWC Projects student scores and reports teacher effectiveness Data 2006 - LEA/School Patterns in data Reports perceptions of working conditions, recruitment, and retention Teachers 2002 – Principals 2010 State/LEA/School Facility, Resources, Decision making, Leadership, PD Summarizes EOG/EOC data for each goal Data 1996 - LEA/School/Class Number of observations, Mean percent correct, Goal distribution

  15. Morning Break

  16. Creating a Culture of Inquiry “Willingness to ask questions – and to look for the real answers- gets to the heart of how data can stimulate the school change process.” Ruth S. Johnson, “Using Data to Close the Achievement Gap: How to Measure Equity in Our Schools”, 2002

  17. Activity: Hometown High School Self-Evaluation • Read and review the completed high school self-evaluation form (SEF). Pages 4-15 • What can you learn about the school? • What questions would the SEF prompt you to ask of the principal or others in the school? • How might you validate or triangulate the information provided in the SEF?

  18. Activity: Stapleton Elementary School Self-Evaluation • Read and review the completed elementary self-evaluation form (SEF). Pages 19-37 and 41-45. • What can you learn about the school? • What questions would the SEF prompt you to ask of the principal or others in the school? • How might you validate or triangulate the information provided in the SEF?

  19. Four Whys – example Don’t feel welcome Aimed at solving school’s problems Historic practice They aren’t comfortable Limited meeting agenda Only concerned with what happens age 5-11 Only educational professionals involved Invitation seen by school as their responsibility No strong links with local community leader Classroom issues seen as priority See school as a part of the ‘establishment’ Parents not experienced adult education or training Parents have no link to what their children are learning Their experience of schools was being told Left school without sense of achievement That has been their experience No alternative models They had poor teaching Friends/wider family not invited Impersonal invitations – from a stranger Don’t respond to communications from school Think that school will tell not listen Parents don’t engage Usually asked to come to school when there is trouble Agenda is school’s, not children’s Parent’s concerns not addressed Don’t think it will help Agenda limited to educational issues Learning seen as separate from everyday life Parents don’t have a positive view of schools Negative experiences as children

  20. Activity: Four Whys – process State the challenge identified on the left side of the paper. Complete the diagram by moving from left to right. Move from the problem/issue statement by asking the group the question “why?” Capture the responses – this can be done by using Post-Its. For each response, again ask the question “why?” Continue to record responses and move across to the right of the diagram. Try to go to five levels of “whys.”

  21. Four Whys – example Don’t feel welcome Aimed at solving school’s problems Historic practice They aren’t comfortable Limited meeting agenda Only concerned with what happens age 5-11 Only educational professionals involved Invitation seen by school as their responsibility No strong links with local community leader Classroom issues seen as priority See school as a part of the ‘establishment’ Parents not experienced adult education or training Parents have no link to what their children are learning Their experience of schools was being told Left school without sense of achievement That has been their experience No alternative models They had poor teaching Friends/wider family not invited Impersonal invitations – from a stranger Don’t respond to communications from school Think that school will tell not listen Parents don’t engage Usually asked to come to school when there is trouble Agenda is school’s, not children’s Parent’s concerns not addressed Don’t think it will help Agenda limited to educational issues Learning seen as separate from everyday life Parents don’t have a positive view of schools Negative experiences as children

  22. Where are we now?

  23. NCDPI CNA: School Level • Turn to page 49 • Write the name of each sub-dimension on a separate chart sheet • Working through all 14 sub-dimensions, brainstorm all possible data you might look at to facilitate analysis of school needs

  24. Models of Excellence Understanding others Personal Values and Passionate Conviction Plan for delivery Share the vision Build commitment and support Monitor, evaluate and improve Gather data and gain understanding

  25. Homework • Create a data notebook containing 14 sections, one for each sub-dimension. • In each section, collect at least 4 evidences, using the Bernhardt circle as a guide.

  26. Feedback on Today What went well? Even better if …