rural sustainability laws and institutions my message in a bottle l.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Rural sustainability, laws and institutions My message in a bottle

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 8

Rural sustainability, laws and institutions My message in a bottle - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 103 Views
  • Uploaded on

Rural sustainability, laws and institutions My message in a bottle. Professor Paul Martin Australian Centre for Agriculture and Law University of New England. Content Specifying the law/institutions transaction cost problem and proposed reformed architectures

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Rural sustainability, laws and institutions My message in a bottle' - chas


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
rural sustainability laws and institutions my message in a bottle

Rural sustainability, laws and institutions My message in a bottle

Professor Paul Martin

Australian Centre for Agriculture and Law

University of New England

our research

Content

Specifying the law/institutions transaction cost problem and proposed reformed architectures

Proposed regulatory processes to improve rural law effectiveness and economy

Transactional methods for creation of systems-focused integrated NRM strategies

Highlight the fiscal gap for sustainability, its effects and some tax and low-cost transactional approaches to investment

Our research
  • Concepts for private sector funded conservation using tax-effective instruments 2008
  • Developing a Good Regulatory Practice Model for Environmental Regulations Impacting on Farmers 2007
  • Sustainability Strategies (Federation Press) 2006
  • Property rights and property responsibility 2002
  • Fifty Million Australians: Can this be sustainable? 2002
  • A Cartography for Natural Resource Law: Finding new paths to effective resource regulation 2000 and 2002 (Using Environmental Law for Effective Regulation).

Purpose: a stronger institutional architecture

some consequent developments
Some consequent developments
  • AgLaw Centre at UNE, ~ 45 Masters and Phd students, 5 staff, research focus on sustainability law and institutions.
  • ~ 20 reform studies e.g. weeds and biofuel risk, ‘next generation’ governance, co-regulation, water institutions, policy risk, duty of care.
  • Research collaboration in USA, Canada, Asia, and Europe.
  • Increasing policy enquiries.
  • Tangible impacts.

Our research

slide4

Australia: suffering instrumental myopia?

TheGoal: to shift social systems, to sustain ecological systems

Many Problems: failures, complexities, frustrations and cost.

Causes:fragmented inefficient institutions.

Effects: results are often insufficient, frequently costly and often unfair

The problems

considering the emperor s wardrobe
Considering the emperor's wardrobe
  • The institutional fabric is torn and insufficient
  • Instruments fail, and we are surprised
  • Farmers feel victimised, but landscape values are declining.
  • We still lack
    • A viable fiscal model for sustaining rural landscapes
    • Systemic behaviour changing strategies addressing integrated ecosystems
    • NRM strategies that embrace social justice
    • Robust process for design and review

The problems

quo vadis
Quo vadis?
  • The ‘sustainable population’ debate should trigger serious reconsideration of the institutional fundamentals
  • The ‘feed in’
    • Farmer rights, social license and identification of regulatory and market cost and limitations
    • Significant sustainable resource use conflicts
    • The Henry review, and fiscal relationships

The future

what will sustainability require
What will sustainability require?
  • Significant innovation in productive use of nature. Why?
  • Significant innovation in (effective) protection. Why?
  • Minimise the cost of/to government. Why?
  • Accessible rules and methods. Why?
  • Innovation and investment in social equity. Why?
  • Some “Hows”
  • Streamline regulation using the Corporations Code/ Trade Practices model architecture
  • Create a unified framework for creating, trading and supervising environmental property rights
  • Create a private sector sustainability funding model, with
    • Lower transaction costs stucture; and
    • A conservation supportive taxation ‘playing field’
  • Incorporate social justice, risk and implementation assessment into the design of the instruments we use.
and the wisdom of many
.. and the wisdom of many.

Australian Farm Institute

Chris Stone

Jack Sinden

Gary Stoneham

Paul Toni

Alice Roughley

Poh Lin Tan

Tony Dormer

Murray Raff

Jason Alexandra

Robyn Bartel

Tony Gleeson

Marty Sammon

Nick Schofield

Stuart Pearson

Neil Gunningham

WWF Australia

Miriam Verbeek

Richard Price

NSW Farmers

Ian Hannam

Donna Craig

Corey Watts

Alex Arbuthnot

Craig Carter

CRC Irrigation Futures

Liverpool Plains Land Management Committee

David Eyre

Andrew Campbell

Jim Donaldson

Mick Keogh

Ken Moore

Mike Young

Michael Lester

Rice Environmental Champions

Thanks