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PNW Pines ( Pinus ). Pines. About 115 species Native to most of the Northern Hemisphere Evergreen, coniferous Mostly trees, rarely bushes 3-80m tall Tallest is a Ponderosa Pine located in Southern Oregon. Pine Ecology. Grow well in acidic soils. Well drained Sandy Soils

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pines
Pines
  • About 115 species
  • Native to most of the Northern Hemisphere
  • Evergreen, coniferous
  • Mostly trees, rarely bushes
  • 3-80m tall
  • Tallest is a Ponderosa Pine located in Southern Oregon
pine ecology
Pine Ecology
  • Grow well in acidic soils.
  • Well drained Sandy Soils
  • Can tolerate extreme conditions due to elevation and latitude
  • Bishop Pines need fire to regenerate
slide4
Uses
  • Used largely as timber
    • Furniture, homes
  • Resin is used for turpentine
  • Used as ornamental plants
  • Used for pine nuts
lodgepole pine
Lodgepole Pine
  • Needles: Two needles per bundle (clustered); 1-3" long; commonly twisted (contorted).
  • Fruit: Small, egg-shaped cones (1-2" long), often with a prickle at the end of each scale. May remain closed on the tree for years.
  • Bark: Thin, dark, and flaky.
ponderosa pine
Ponderosa Pine
  • Needles: bundles of 3, 5-10 inches long; held for only 2-3 years.
  • Fruit: Egg-shaped cone; 3-5 inches long (much smaller than Jeffrey pine cones); each scale has a straight, stiff prickle that sticks out.
  • Bark: Flakes off in shapes like jigsaw puzzle pieces. Older trees have a distinct yellow or orange color (not red like Jeffrey pine).
jeffery pine
Jeffery Pine
  • Needles: bundles of 3, 5-10 inches long; often "bushy" along twig. Last 5-8 years on tree.
  • Fruit: Large, woody cones; 5-12 inches long (much larger than ponderosa pine cones); each scale has a curved (J-shaped) prickle that curves inward.
  • Bark: Flakes off in jigsaw puzzle-like pieces. Older bark is distinctly reddish-brown (not as orange as ponderosa pine)
western white pine
Western White Pine
  • Needles: Occur in bundles of 5; 2-4 inches long; white lines on 2 sides of each 3-sided needle.
  • Fruit: Woody cones, 5-12 inches long.  slender and curved. Cone scales are thin and often curve up on the end.
  • Bark: Dark; broken into small squares or rectangles on older trees (smooth on young trees). Bark often "ringed" where a whorl of branches once grew
white bark pine
White-bark Pine
  • Needles: Occur in bundles of 5; 1-3 inches long; faint, white lines on all surfaces.
  • Fruit: Small, woody cones, 2-3 inches long; nearly round; thick cone scales with no prickles.
  • Bark: Thin, scaly, and grayish throughout its life