slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
English 1020 Unit 2: Critical Perspectives on Hamlet PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
English 1020 Unit 2: Critical Perspectives on Hamlet

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 64

English 1020 Unit 2: Critical Perspectives on Hamlet - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 97 Views
  • Uploaded on

English 1020 Unit 2: Critical Perspectives on Hamlet.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'English 1020 Unit 2: Critical Perspectives on Hamlet' - ceana


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

English 1020 Unit 2:

Critical Perspectives on Hamlet

Throughout this unit we will study the play Hamlet by William Shakespeare through the lenses of the critical 
perspectives. My goal is for you to sharpen your analytic 
skills while further exploring literature as a "work of narrative 
art about the human condition" that will "broaden, sharpen 
and deepen your insight into life". At the end of this unit you 
will write an original analysis of Hamlet based on an original thesis inspired by two critical perspectives, using critical 
articles on the play as support.

slide2

2/5/13

Big Question:

 How do movie producers manipulate 
different elements to present an 
interpretation of a text in a movie poster?

Do Now:

 Examine the movie poster on the whiteboard carefully. 
Then make a prediction about Hamlet by William Shakespeare and support it with three specific details from 
the poster.

slide3

Analyzing Movie Posters Activity

Since Hamlet is one of the oldest and most revered works of literature in the canon, many movie directors have attempted to 
capture the play on film. Today we'll look at some of the various 
movie posters created over time and use them to both hone our 
analytic skills and prepare to read and interpret Hamlet on our own.

slide4

2/6/13

Objectve:

  Students will understand that 
the key to understanding how to read 
Hamlet involves understanding 
Shakespeare's language.

Do Now:

Examine the movie poster on the whiteboard carefully.

Then make a prediction about Hamlet by William Shakespeare and 
support it with three specific details from the poster.

slide5

Unit Overview

Throughout this unit you will sharpen your analytic skills 
while further exploring literature as a "work of narrative art 
about the human condition" that will "broaden, sharpen and 
deepen your insight into life".

Readings:

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

 Various Critical Articles

Reading Logs:

 As a part of this unit you must complete 3 critical perspectives discussion board posts.

Writing Assignment:

 At the end of this unit you will write a literary analysis paper on Hamlet based on an original thesis inspired by 
two of the critical perspectives, one of which must be the formalist perspective. This paper will rely on both 
your original analysis of the text and corroborating evidence from appropriate primary and secondary sources. 
We'll discuss this further when it's time to start writing. In the meantime, the critical perspectives logs will help 
you explore the play through different lenses to help you find the lens that you want to use for your paper.

slide6

What are some of the aspects of 
Shakespeare's language that you need to 
be aware of?

Syntax

Archaic Words

Iambic Pentameter

Rhetorical Techniques

slide7

Syntax

Syntax is a fancy way of saying word order. Shakespeare often uses 
unusual order in his sentences.

For example:

“Still am I called.”1.5.94 (The “I” and “am” are reversed.)

 “If he not love her.”2.1.178 (Instead of “If he doesn’t love her.”)

slide8

Archaic Words

Many of the words used in Shakespeare’s time are either not regularly 
used today or might have had a different meaning in his time. Use 
your understanding of the other words in a sentence to figure out the 
meaning of an odd word. Later I'll also give you a list of some of the 
really strange words he uses. Finally, don't be afraid to pick up a 
dictionary or search out the meaning of a word online.

slide9

Iambic Pentameter

Shakespeare predominately uses a type of meter called iambic 
pentameter in this play. An iamb is a set of two syllables with the accent 
on the second syllable, and penta refers to five, so iambic pentameter is a 
line with five iambs. See the example below:

- /  - / - / - / - /

Good Hamlet cast thy nighted color off,

And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark

As your reading, keep an eye out for anomalies in this pattern, as this is 
almost always done intentionally to reveal subtext or add emphasis to a 
line.

slide10

Rhetorical Techniques

Intertwined with syntax, rhetoric exerts another powerful influence 
on Elizabethan writing. Rhetoric in its original sense means "the art 
or study of using language effectively and persuasively." While I 
won't be getting into some of the more obscure terms (is there 
anyone who isn't frightened by a mouthful of syllables like 
"paraprosdokian"?), a healthy understanding of poetry's debt to 
rhetoric is in order.

slide12

Homework:

Find a good, thorough summary of each act of Hamlet 
and read the summary of act 1.

slide13

Hamlet Quotes Activity

Each of you will now receive a quote from Hamlet.

Your job is to carefully read over your quote to see what you think it 
means, practice saying it out loud, examine words that might have 
multiple meanings, and annotate it for any literary or rhetorical 
techniques you see.

Then write a short (very short) response analyzing how Shakespeare's use 
of specific word choice, word order, iambic pentameter and other 
techniques work together to reveal the meaning of your quote.

slide14

2/8/13

Objective:

 Students will understand how 
Shakespeare uses a variety of 
techniques in Act 1 Scene 1 to 
establish that "something's rotten 
in the state of Denmark".

Do Now:

 Take a copy of the first two acts of Hamlet and 
write your name on the cover.

slide15

Elizabethan Chain of Being

God

King

Elizabethans believed that the universe 
was ordered in this fashion, so the king 
was the closest representative of God 
on earth. This reinforced the divine 
right of kingship, a concept that stated 
that the king's authority came directly 
from God. Shakespeare knew that his 
audience would be familiar with this 
idea and uses it in many of his tragedy 
and history plays.

Nobles

Common People

Animals

Plants

Inanimate Objects

slide16

Something's Rotten

Iambs are choppy/ not full lines

Diction-

usurp- suggest wrongful takeover

slide17

King Fortinbras

of Norway

Old King Hamlet

of Denmark

Hamlet

Young Fortinbras

slide18

Wrap Up-

 How does Shakespeare use a variety 
of techniques to show that "something's 
rotten in the state of Denmark"?

Write your answer in the margin at the bottom of pg. 194.

Make sure that you use specific techniques and textual evidence to 
support your answer.

slide19

2/11/13

Objective:

 Students will evaluate to 
what extent Hamlet's thoughts 
and behaviors are reasonable 
reactions to recent changes in his 
life.

Do Now:

 You will each receive a handout which will 
include an excerpt from Hamlet in which either Queen 
Gertrude or King Claudius tries to convince Hamlet 
that he needs to get over his father's death. First put 
the lines in your own words and then evaluate the 
appeals used by each character to convince Hamlet to 
change. We'll look at his reactions later in the scene.

slide20

King: But to persevere

In obstinate condolement is a course

Of impious stubbornness. 'Tis unmanly grief;

It shows a will most incorrect to heaven,

A heart unfortified, a mind impatient,

An understanding simple and unschool'd;

For what we know must be, and is as common

As any the most vulgar thing to sense,

Why should we in our peevish opposition

Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven,

A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,

To reason most absurd, whose common theme

Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried,

From the first corse till he that died to-day,

'This must be so.'

1) What appeals does Claudius use to convince Hamlet to stop grieving over his father's death?

2) How does Hamlet respond to the King? Is his response emotional or rational? Explain.

slide21

Queen: Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off,

And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark.

Do not for ever with thy vailed lids

Seek for thy noble father in the dust.

Thou know'st 'tis common. All that lives must die,

Passing through nature to eternity.

1) What appeals does the Queen use to convince Hamlet to stop grieving over his father's death?

2) How does Hamlet respond to the Queen? Is his response emotional or rational? Explain.

slide22

Psychological Perspective

and

Formalist Perspective

*As we read 1.2, take notes and formulate questions 
using both the psychological and formalist perspectives 
for class discussion.

*Be prepared to discuss and/or write a response 
evaluating Hamlet's mindset at the end of class.

slide23

Homework:

 Read Hamlet's soliloquy in 
1.2 carefully and annotate for 
clues as to his mental state in 
this scene. We'll start class 
tomorrow with a discussion of 
your findings.

slide24

2/12/13

Objective:

 Students will evaluate to what extent 
Hamlet's thoughts and behaviors are 
reasonable reactions to recent changes in his 
life.

Do Now:

 Take out your annotated copy of Hamlet's soliloquy in 1.2 and 
practice your skills as scanning lines by marking off the iambic 
pentameter in the first four lines.

slide25

O, that this too too solid flesh would melt

Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!

How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable,

Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Fie on't! ah fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,

That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature

Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

But break, my heart; for I must hold my tongue.

slide26

But two months dead: nay, not so much, not two:

So excellent a king; that was, to this,

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

Must I remember? why, she would hang on him,

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on: and yet, within a month--

Let me not think on't--Frailty, thy name is woman!--

A little month, or ere those shoes were old

With which she follow'd my poor father's body,

Like Niobe, all tears:--why she, even she--

slide27

O, God! a beast, that wants discourse of reason,

Would have mourn'd longer--married with my uncle,

My father's brother, but no more like my father

Than I to Hercules: within a month:

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married. O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

It is not nor it cannot come to good:

But break, my heart; for I must hold my tongue.

slide28

Wrap-Up

 To what extent are Hamlet's thoughts 
and behaviors reasonable reactions to 
recent changes in his life?

Write a response to the question above on the bottom margin of 
pgs. 196 to 197 in your copy of the play. Use specific literary 
techniques and excerpts, including line numbers) from what we 
read yesterday to support your answers.

slide29

2/13/13

Objective:

Students will understand how examining Act1 Scene3 from the Marxist perspective gives us insight into societal norms.

Do Now:

The next scene we're about to read involves two people trying to persuade a young woman to break of a relationship. If you were in a position where you thought a friend of yours needed to break off a relationship, how would you approach the subject with her?

slide30

Wrap-Up-

What insight did you gain into the societal norms that govern the lives of the characters in this play from the interactions between members of Polonius's family?

slide31

2/14/13-2/15/13

Big Question:

 How does the use of language and 
literary techniques in 1.4 and 1.5 help you 
evaluate ghost's identity and intentions?

Do Now:

 Open your play to where we left off yesterday and 
get ready to read!

slide32

Compare and contrast what the 
ghost and Hamlet have to say 
about Claudius:

What Hamlet Says in Act 1 Sc 2:

That it should come to this!

But two months dead! Nay, not so much, not two.

So excellent a king, that was to this

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

Must I remember?

What the Ghost Says in Act 1 Sc 5:

Ay, that incestuous, that adulterate beast,

With witchcraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts-

O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power

So to seduce!- won to his shameful lust

The will of my most seeming-virtuous queen.

O Hamlet, what a falling-off was there,

From me, whose love was of that dignity

That it went hand in hand even with the vow

I made to her in marriage, and to decline

Upon a wretch whose natural gifts were poor

To those of mine!

slide33

Compare and contrast what the 
ghost and Hamlet have to say about 
Queen Gertrude:

Why, she would hang on him

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on; and yet, within a month-

Let me not think on't! Frailty, thy name is woman!-

A little month, or ere those shoes were old

With which she followed my poor father's body

Like Niobe, all tears- why she, even she

(O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason

Would have mourn'd longer) married with my uncle;

My father's brother, but no more like my father

Than I to Hercules. Within a month,

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married. O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

It is not, nor it cannot come to good.

But break my heart, for I must hold my tongue.

But virtue, as it never will be mov'd,

Though lewdness court it in a shape of heaven,

So lust, though to a radiant angel link'd,

Will sate itself in a celestial bed

And prey on garbage.

If thou hast nature in thee, bear it not.

Let not the royal bed of Denmark be

A couch for luxury and damned incest.

But, howsoever thou pursuest this act,

Taint not thy mind, nor let thy soul contrive

Against thy mother aught. Leave her to heaven,

And to those thorns that in her bosom lodge

To prick and sting her. Fare thee well at once.

The glowworm shows the matin to be near

And gins to pale his uneffectual fire.

Adieu, adieu, adieu! Remember me.

slide34

So......is the ghost really Hamlet's father or an evil spirit 
telling Hamlet what he wants to hear?

slide35

2/18/13

Objective:

Coming Soon!

Do Now:

 ??????- This is where I have stopped planning for this year. More will be coming soon!

slide36

Interpreting Through Performance 
Activity

Today you'll be working in groups to interpret part of one of the scenes you 
read for homework and actually perform your interpretation for the class. 
Here are your directions:

Get Started!!! - Performances will begin in 20 minutes!

Step 1- Choose either the Marxist or Psychological 
perspective to guide your interpretation and decide what 
aspects of the scene to focus on and play up during 
performance.

Step 2- Cut lines that your group feels unnecessary. 
You may rewrite the script as a modern day version if 
you so choose. Your goal should be to keep your scene 
under 5 minutes.

Step 3- Choose roles. You need a director and as many 
actors as are necessary to fill the parts in your scene. 
Extra group members may act as special effects or 
assist the director.

Step 4- Block out your scene using anything within my 
room as a resource. The lights can be used for lighting, 
the desks or podium can be setting, etc.

Step 5- Practice, Practice, Practice!

slide37

How does interpreting and acting out a 
scene through one or more critical 
perspectives help you better understand 
different aspects of the play?

slide38

4/10/12

Big Question:

 How does examining 2.2 through the lens 
of deception help you better understand the 
mindset and motivations of the characters in 
the scene?

Do Now:

 One of the themes in Hamlet is deception. Take a few minutes to look back over Act 1 and Act 2 Scene 1 and mark off lines 
where you see evidence of this theme.

slide39

Homework:

Read 2.2 lines 445-550

Sketch a visual representation of the three 
characters in the player's speech: Phyrrus, Priam 
and Hecuba

slide40

2/11/12

How does examining 2.2 through the lens 
of deception help you better understand 
the mindset and motivations of the 
characters in the scene?

Do Now:

In 2.2 Polonius comments in an aside that "Though this be 
madness, yet there is a method in't" while speaking with Hamlet. 
As we read today, you'll be examining the method behind 
Hamlet's madness. Open your play to pg. 215 to get started.

slide41

4/12/12

Big Question:

 How does examining 2.2 through the 
lens of deception help you better understand 
the mindset and motivations of the characters 
in the scene?

As we read 2.2 lines 445-550, pay close attention 
to the descriptions of the characters. Then sketch a 
visual representation of the three characters in the 
player's speech: Pyrrhus, Priam and Hecuba.

slide42

4/12/12

Big Question:

 What insight do we gain into 
Hamlet's mental state from his 
soliloquy at the end of Act 2?

Discussion Starter

What motivated Hamlet to ask the player to give that particular 
speech? What does this reveal about his mindset at this point in the 
play?

slide43

Act 2 Scene 2 Wrap Up

1)What insight do we gain into Hamlet's mental state 
from his soliloquy at the end of Act 2?

2)How does examining 2.2 through the lens of deception 
help you better understand the mindset and motivations 
of the characters in the scene?

slide44

Critical Perspectives Logs

Between now and April 20thyou are responsible for completing 3 critical perspective 
logs. Each log should be a well developed paragraph in which you examine the text from 
one of the critical perspectives. Use the logs to approach the text from different 
perspectives in order to explore what perspective you want to pair with formalism when 
you develop your thesis. You don't have to complete the logs in a particular order, but 
each log should be inspired from a different perspective from the list below.

Marxist

Formalist

Reader Response

Psychological

Historical

Feminist

Log 1 Due 4/13

Log 2 Due 4/18

Log 3 Due 4/20

slide45

Homework:

Read Act 3 Scene 1 in preparation for tomorrow's class. 
As you read, pay close attention to evidence of themes 
and annotate based on critical perspectives (ex: Marxist, 
feminist, psychological).

slide46

4/13/12

Big Question:

 How does analyzing several versions 
of the "To Be or Not to Be" speech help 
you better understand the text?

Do Now:

 Read over the "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy and 
jot down your interpretation of what Hamlet means and 
his current mindset in the space provided on the handout 
and then brieflyanswer the following questions.

slide47

4/16/10

Big Question:

 How does analyzing several versions 
of the "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquy help 
you better understand the text?

Do Now:

 Take out your notes from Friday so that we can finish 
viewing and analyzing video clips of the "To Be or Not to Be" 
soliloquy.

slide48

"To Be or Not to Be" Film Analysis

YOUR ASSIGNMENT:

Today we will watch 5 versions of the "To Be or Not to Be" soliloquoy. Answer the following 
questions for each:

What did you see each actor’s interpretation emphasizing?

How does each actor’s interpretation affect the way you understand the story?

After watching all of the versions, respond to this final question using specific references to 
details from the film:

Which fits your personal understanding of the story better and why?

*All work will be collected at the end of class.

slide49

Analyzing Text Variants

Take out your homework from yesterday and share your responses 
with a partner. Use what you learn from each other to add to your 
response.

slide50

Analyzing Text Variants

Which text variant of the "To Be or Not to Be" speech would you 
choose if you were going to direct a new production of Hamlet? Why?

slide51

Big Question:

 What insight into Hamlet's mental 
state do you gain from viewing 3.1 
through the psychological perspective?

slide52

4/16/10

Big Question:

 To what extent are Hamlet's words 
and actions in Act 3 reasonable?

Do Now:

Sit according to your number, take out your homework and 
discuss responses as a group for the first 2-3 minutes of 
class.

slide53

Jigsaw Activity

Follow the directions on the provided handout to examine 3.3 in 
depth. This short scene gives us insight into the mindset of 
Claudius as well as Hamlet.

slide54

in

4/17/10

Big Question:

 How does Ophelia's madness 
compare to Hamlet's madness?

Do Now:

 Take out the sheet on Ophelia's flowers from last week.

Do Now:

 Open your copy of the play to pg. 239 and write a one 
sentence summary at the beginning of each scene in Act 4.

slide55

Hamlet's Madness

Ophelia's 
Madness

slide56

4/18/10

Big Question:

 To what extent does the ending of the 
play fit with the themes and conflicts 
within the play?

Do Now:

 What themes have we seen so far in the play?

 What conflicts have we seen so far in the play?

slide59

4/18/10

Big Question:

 How old do you think Hamlet is?

Do Now:

 How old did you think Hamlet was based on his thoughts, 
behaviors and attitudes throughout the play? Jot your answer in 
your notes.