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KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER LIMBS DURING FORWARD AND BACKWARD STAIR DESCENT WITH AND WITHOUT A FRONT LOAD Olinda Habib PowerPoint Presentation
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Biomechanics Laboratory. KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER LIMBS DURING FORWARD AND BACKWARD STAIR DESCENT WITH AND WITHOUT A FRONT LOAD Olinda Habib Perez & D. Gordon E. Robertson School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Results & Discussion

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Biomechanics Laboratory

KINETICANALYSIS OF THE LOWER LIMBS DURING FORWARD AND BACKWARD STAIR DESCENT WITH AND WITHOUT A FRONT LOAD

Olinda Habib Perez & D. Gordon E. Robertson

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Results & Discussion

The following terminology is used to describe three sub-phases of stair descent during stance phase: weight-acceptance (WA), forward-continuance (FCN) and controlled-lowering (CL) [4]. Sub-phases during swing, leg pull-through (LP) and preparation for foot placement (FP), will not be discussed. Figure 2 holds the averaged (5 trials) flexion/extension results for a typical subject during loaded forwards descent. Figure 3 has the same subject’s data for loaded backwards descent.

When comparing LF and LB, both conditions mimicked their unloaded conditions and were similar to those of Beaulieu et al. [3] and Radka et al. [5]. During forward descent conditions, at WA the ankle performed negative work to receive body weight and to transfer of energy from the contralateral limb; this occurred from initial foot-contact until single-leg support. Although not shown, the hip abductors also performed negative work during WA to prevent the body from collapsing inwards while descending the stairs. During CL the knee extensor moment worked negatively to gradually lowered the centre of mass to control the rate of descent. In addition, ankle plantiflexors applied brief bursts of positive work to permit the foot to clear the stair edge. As expected and similar to level walking the hip flexors provided small bursts of power during late stance and early swing to swing the leg forwards. The amount of work done was less than that of level walking since the stride length during stair descent was less than a walking stride [3].

Backwards descent required significantly lower knee extensor moments of force and powers during WA and particularly CL than those of F descent. At the ankle, the plantiflexors provided a small burst of positive power after WA but prior to FCN, which did not occur with forwards descent. Not surprisingly, instead of the hip flexors being active at the end of stance and early swing the hip extensors provided the positive work necessary to cause the lower extremity to swing through to the next stair (two steps down). The most significant difference, however, was the greater than two times reduction in the peak knee extensor power during the CL when collapse of the knee can cause a fall down the stairs. These results provide evidence that backwards stair descent is a favourable alternative to forwards stair descent for people carrying front loads or during pregnancy.

Introduction

Over 80% of falls occur during stair descent [1] and 43% of women experience nonwork related of falls during pregnancy [2]. This research investigated forward and backward stair descent with and without a 10 kg front load to determine how backwards stair descent affects the lower extremity’s kinetics. The front load was used to model the changes during pregnancy that put pregnant women at greater risk of falling down stairs.

Methods

Five healthy female students participated in this study. The subjects performed four different descent conditions: forwards, loaded forwards (LF), backwards and loaded backwards (LB). The load was a 10-litre hydration bag (10 kg) designed to mimic weight changes during pregnancy. The five-step staircase had 20 cm risers and 30 cm treads. Three force plates (Kistler) were used with one on the ground and the others on the 2nd and 3rd steps (Figure 1). Six Vicon MX-13 cameras recorded movement trajectories at 200 Hz. Visual3D computed the net moments of force and their powers.

  • Conclusions
  • Loaded backwards descent demonstratedlower knee extensor moments of force and powers during WA and CL than those of loaded forwards descent.
  • Knee extensor power during the CL throughout loaded backwards descent reduced by more than two times the loaded forwards descent.

Figure 1. Visual representation of loaded backwards (left) and loaded forwards (right) stair descent .

Figure 2. Moments (top) and powers of the ankle (left), knee (mid) and hip (right) joints during loaded forward stair descent. Leading leg (red/green) and trailing leg (black) are shown.

Figure 3. Moments (top) and powers of the ankle (left), knee (mid) and hip (right) joints during loaded backwards stair descent. Leading leg (red/green) and trailing leg (black) are shown.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to François Beaulieu and Tyler Cluff for stair construction and technical support.

References

1. Roys M. The risk associated with various stair parameters. 6th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Control. Montreal, May 2002.

2. Dunning K et al. Amer J Industrial Med44:664-672, 2003.

3. Beaulieu F, Pelland L, Robertson DGE. Gait Posture27:564-571, 2008.

4. McFadyen B, Winter D. J Biomech21:733-744, 1988.

5. Radtka SA et al. Gait Posture24:211-218, 2006.