title i part c migrant education program requirements n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Requirements PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Requirements

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 33
Download Presentation

Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Requirements - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

carlos-ruiz
159 Views
Download Presentation

Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Requirements

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program Requirements Session 2 Thursday, August 14, 2014

  2. Session Overview • Overview of Title I, Part C Migrant Education • Parent Engagement • Professional Development • Health Services

  3. Elementary and Secondary Education Act • Established 1966 after Title I, Part A (1965) • Under Reauthorization 2001, No Child Left Behind, six primary purposes: • Support high-quality and comprehensive educational programs that help reduce the impact of educational disruptions. • Ensure students moving among states are not penalized by disparities in curriculum, graduation requirements, and state academic content and achievement standards. • Provided appropriate educational services (including support services) that address their special needs in a coordinated and efficient manner.

  4. Elementary and Secondary Education Act - Continued • Under Reauthorization 2001, No Child Left Behind, six primary purposes - continued • Ensure migrant children receive full and appropriate opportunities to meet the same State academic content and achievement standards that all children are expected to meet. • Design programs to help migratory children overcome educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, various health-related problems, and other factors that inhibit the ability of such children to do well in school and prepare them for a successful transition to postsecondary education or employment; and • Ensure that migrant children benefit from state and local system reforms.

  5. Start with the End in Mind • Consolidated Program Review (CPR) Checklist • “Look-fors” • 14 Review Items, including fiscal review of allowable activities • Supplement NOT Supplant • Coordinated Services • Parent Input • Student Selection

  6. Supplement NOT Supplant "Supplement, not supplant" is the phrase used to describe the requirement that MEP funds may be used only to supplement the level of funds that would, in the absence of MEP funds, be made available from non-Federal sources for the education of children participating in MEP projects. SEAs and local operating agencies may not use MEP funds to supplant (i.e., replace) non-Federal funds.

  7. Coordinated Services Intensified Services – may include Title I, C, Migrant Supplemental Services – Title I, LAP, Title III, Title I, C Migrant All students – basic education, state, local resources

  8. Title I, Part C, Migrant EducationGrant Application 2014-15 Addressing the Identified Needs of Migrant Students: Page 3

  9. Title I, Part C, Migrant EducationGrant Application 2014-15 Addressing the Identified Needs of Migrant Students: Page 2

  10. Title I, Part C, Migrant EducationGrant Application 2014-15 Addressing the Identified Needs of Migrant Students: Page 2

  11. Title I, Part C, Migrant EducationGrant Application 2014-15 Page 5 Intensified Services – may include Title I, C, Migrant Supplemental Services – Title I, LAP, Title III, Title I, C Migrant All students – basic education, state, local resources

  12. Title I, Part C, Migrant EducationGrant Application 2014-15 Page 2

  13. PARENT INVOLVEMENT • Parent Advisory Council – Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Sec. 1304 (c)(3) “in the planning and operation of programs and projects at both the State and local level, there is consultation with parent advisory councils.” • Sec. 1304(c)(3)(A) “in a manner that provide for the same parental involvement as required for program and projects under Section 1118” [Title I, Part A].

  14. Who does what? PAC coordinator – federal programs director or designee (note if coordinator is also records clerk or recruiter, time allotted for coordination must be in addition to time allotted for other duties) What is involved: Scheduling meetings Training PAC officers Establishing or updating bylaws Coordinating meeting notices and/or reminders Establishing meeting agendas Capturing meeting notes/minutes Identifying items that need additional work/follow-up Inviting or scheduling guest speakers Recruiting new members Celebrating PAC efforts

  15. PARENT INVOLVEMENT Parent Advisory Council – assist with the planning, implementation, and evaluation of local programs. Local Outcomes Measured by Scheduled meetings, sign-in sheets, minutes/notes of each meeting. Meeting notice, sign-in sheets, evaluation results report. Meeting agenda, sign-in sheets, input summary. Meeting agenda, sign-in sheets, meeting minutes/notes. Listing of students to present, meeting notice, sign-in sheets, minutes/notes. • The PAC will meet [three] times per year during the months of September, January, and April. • The PAC will assist in the evaluation of assessment data as reported in the MSIS iGrants system at the January meeting. • The PAC will provide input into the planning of local migrant programs and evaluate local efforts during the April meeting. • The PAC will review the implementation of the approved grant application in September. • The PAC will invite students who participated in summer programs and state events to present their experience to the advisory committee in January.

  16. Parent Involvement General Parent Meetings • Informational/Program Updates • Community and local agency presenters • School district/building notices and information • Fostering capacity for migrant parents to participate in other parent activities such as PTSA • Fostering capacity for migrant parents to volunteer in school building, classroom, student field trips, etc. • Fostering capacity for migrant parents to present to other parent groups or school board

  17. Parent Involvement Research • Joyce Epstein – John’s Hopkins University • 6 Types of Parent Involvement • Parenting • Communicating • Volunteering • Learning at Home • Decision Making • Collaborating with the Community

  18. Parent Involvement Research • Joyce Epstein – John’s Hopkins University • 6 Types of Parent Involvement • Parenting – increasing parent’s understanding of their child’s growth and development (health). • Communicating – school-to-home and home-to-school communications about school and classroom programs and children’s progress. • Volunteering – enable families to share their time and talents to support the school, teachers, and students.

  19. Parent Involvement Research • Joyce Epstein – John’s Hopkins University • 6 Types of Parent Involvement • Learning at Home – provide information about the academic work students are doing in the classroom, how to help with homework, and curriculum-related activities. • Decision Making – parents participate in decisions about school programs that affect their own and other children. • Collaborating with the Community – encourages the cooperation of schools, families, and community groups, organizations, agencies, and indviduals.

  20. Question • What of the 6 Types could be supported by Title I, Part C, Migrant Education? • How could these activities be conducted?

  21. Additional Research Beyond the Bake Sale – Henderson, Mapp, Johnson, Davies • Building relationships • Linking to Learning • Addressing Differences – race, class, culture • Supporting Advocacy – becoming partners • Sharing Power – practicing democracy • District support • Searching for resources • Support tools – checklists, surveys, policies, etc.

  22. Professional Development All school personnel have been provided professional development to enhance their ability to understand and appropriately respond to the needs of migrant students. Sec 13014(c)(5); Sec 1304(c)(6)(B). Two types of professional development: • PD for staff paid with Program funds. • PD for staff working with migrant students

  23. Professional DevelopmentStaff Working with Migrant Students Do staff working with migrant students understand the migratory lifestyle? Have you ever said or been asked any or all of the following questions? “Why do families leave during the school year?” “Don’t they know they are hurting their child’s education?” “Couldn’t they leave their kids with someone here if they must go?” “How do they expect their children to make-up for lost work?”

  24. Professional Development • Staff should be able to articulate the mobility patterns of migrant students/families in their district. • Should be familiar with school district policies on extended absence agreements. • Should be able to provide migrant students resources or options for when they are not in school. • Should be familiar with the supplemental services being provided under the Migrant Education Program grant. • Should be able to identify the resources and services a student could access, besides the Migrant Program, when they return to school. • Should know who is a Priority for Service migrant student. • Should be provided resources and information on how they may be able to adapt instruction for ELL migrant students.

  25. Professional Development: Making it Meaningful • Migrant students/ parents panel to share their stories as part of professional development work session. • Book study – “Where Do I Go from Here?” Karen S. Vocke • Book study – “Dream Field” an anthology of Mount Vernon Migrant Youth and their Allies • Movie night – Bajo la Misma Luna with discussion to follow.

  26. livingvoices.org

  27. Question • What are some ways you will address Professional Development in alignment with Title I, Part C?

  28. Health ESEA Purpose (5) … “design programs to help migratory children overcome…various health-related problems…” Sec. 1304(b)(3) “the State will provide for educational continuity through the timely transfer of pertinent school records, including information on health…” State Service Delivery Plan – Reduce or minimize the various health-related problems that inhibit the ability of migrant children to do well in school.

  29. Health Activities: • Report in the Migrant Student Information System (MSIS) system (by district) students who have had a health physical within the last three years (36-months) – private or public. • Identify within the MSIS system those students who have not had a health physical within the last three years (36-months). • Work with Migrant Education Health Program (MEHP), Mike Taylor, to determine which students need a health physical exam provided through the Migrant Education Program. • Coordinate access to state resources such as Apple Health. • Work with MEHP to schedule health exams. • Work with MEHP to report exam results in MSIS. • Work with MEHP to conduct follow-up or other urgent care needs that are not available through other resources.

  30. http://health.msdr.org/

  31. Contacts Title I, Part C, Migrant Education Program OSPI Mea Moore, Director 360-725-6147 www.k12.wa.us/migrantbilingual Migrant Student Data, Recruitment, and Support Sunnyside School District Lee Campos, Director 509-837-2712 www.msdr.org Migrant Education Health Program North Central ESD Mike Taylor, Program Supervisor 509-667-3646 www.health.msdr.org Educational Service District 105, Yakima Cynthia Juarez, Director 509-454-2488 123, Pasco Nicole Castilleja, Coordinator 509-544-5756 171 (North Central), Wenatchee Mary Jane Ross, Academic Achievement Specialist 509-667-3633 189 (Northwest), Anacortes Patricia Bennett, Coordinator 509-299-4043