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James Milender Del Rio High School San Felipe-Del Rio C.I.S.D. Dr. Sy-Bor Wen, Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering Texas A&M University. Overview of the Summer Research Project. Generation of Core/Shell Nanoparticles with Two Pulsed Lasers

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james milender del rio high school san felipe del rio c i s d

James MilenderDel Rio High SchoolSan Felipe-Del Rio C.I.S.D.

Dr. Sy-Bor Wen, Assistant Professor

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Texas A&M University

overview of the summer research project
Overview of the Summer Research Project
  • Generation of Core/Shell Nanoparticles with Two Pulsed Lasers
  • Germanium target struck first to create plasma plume
  • Germanium plasma condenses into Germanium nanoparticles
  • Copper target is then struck to create a copper plasma plume.
  • Copper condenses around Germanium nanoparticles to create Ge/Cu Core/Shell nanoparticles
initial idea for classroom project
Initial Idea for Classroom Project
  • Lasers!
  • Energy beaming ??

http://www.eads.com/1024/en/madebyeads/protection/solar_energy_by_laser.html

laser energy beaming
Laser Energy Beaming
  • Possible
  • Out of budget
  • Not safe for high school classroom

http://www.electricstuff.co.uk/scarylaser.gif

energy beaming with spotlight
Energy Beaming with Spotlight
  • Also possible!
  • Within Budget!
  • Safe for classroom use!
the project energy beaming
The Project – Energy Beaming

Many countries are currently designing vehicles that used beamed light in the form of lasers as their energy source. Some countries are developing methods to beam energy from orbiting satellites to cities on Earth.

Design a solar powered car that will use beamed light as its power source.

core element of research project bridged into classroom project
Core Element of Research Project Bridged into Classroom Project

Using energy in the form of light to accomplish a task.

taks objective 1
TAKS Objective 1

The student will describe functional relationships in a variety of ways.

(A.1) Foundations for functions. The student understands that a function represents a dependence of one quantity on another and can be described in a variety of ways. The student is expected to

(A) describe independent and dependent quantities in functional relationships;

(B) [gather and record data and] use data sets to determine functional relationships between quantities;

(C) describe functional relationships for given problem situations and write equations or inequalities to answer questions arising from the situations;

(D) represent relationships among quantities using [concrete] models, tables, graphs, diagrams, verbal descriptions, equations, and inequalities; and

(E) interpret and make decisions, predictions, and critical judgments from functional relationships

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 2
TAKS Objective 2

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties and attributes of functions.

(A.2) Foundations for functions. The student uses the properties and attributes of functions. The student is expected to

(B) identify mathematical domains and ranges and determine reasonable domain and range values for given situations, both continuous and discrete;

(C) interpret situations in terms of given graphs [or create situations that fit given graphs];and

(D) [collect and] organize data, [make and] interpret scatterplots (including recognizing positive, negative, or no correlation for data approximating linear situations), and model, predict, and make decisions and critical judgments in problem situations.

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 21
TAKS Objective 2

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties and attributes of functions.

(A.3) Foundations for functions. The student understands how algebra can be used to express generalizations and recognizes and uses the power of symbols to represent situations. The student is expected to

(A) use symbols to represent unknowns and variables; and

(B) look for patterns and represent generalizations algebraically.

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 3
TAKS Objective 3

The student will demonstrate an understanding of linear functions.

(A.5) Linear functions. The student understands that linear functions can be represented in

different ways and translates among their various representations. The student is expected to

(A) determine whether or not given situations can be represented by linear functions; and

(C) use, translate, and make connections among algebraic, tabular, graphical, or verbal

descriptions of linear functions.

(A.6) Linear functions. The student understands the meaning of the slope and intercepts of the

graphs of linear functions and zeros of linear functions and interprets and describes the

effects of changes in parameters of linear functions in real-world and mathematical

situations. The student is expected to

(A) develop the concept of slope as rate of change and determine slopes from graphs, tables,

and algebraic representations;

(B) interpret the meaning of slope and intercepts in situations using data, symbolic

representations, or graphs;

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 4
TAKS Objective 4

The student will formulate and use linear equations and inequalities.

(A.7) Linear functions. The student formulates equations and inequalities based on linear functions, uses a variety of methods to solve them, and analyzes the solutions in terms of the situation. The student is expected to

(A) analyze situations involving linear functions and formulate linear equations or inequalities to solve problems;

(B) investigate methods for solving linear equations and inequalities using [concrete] models, graphs, and the properties of equality, select a method, and solve the equations and inequalities; and

(C) interpret and determine the reasonableness of solutions to linear equations and inequalities.

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 5
TAKS Objective 5

The student will demonstrate an understanding of quadratic and other nonlinear functions.

(A.11) Quadratic and other nonlinear functions. The student understands there are situations modeled by functions that are neither linear nor quadratic and models the situations. The student is expected to

(A) use [patterns to generate] the laws of exponents and apply them in problem-solving situations.

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 10
TAKS Objective 10

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the mathematical processes and tools used in problem solving.

(8.14) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 8 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other disciplines, and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to

(A) identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics;

(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

taks objective 101
TAKS Objective 10

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the mathematical processes and tools used in problem solving.

(8.15) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 8 mathematics through informal and mathematical language, representations, and models. The student is expected to

(A) communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools, appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models.

(8.16) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning to make conjectures and verify conclusions. The student is expected to

(A) make conjectures from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples;

Exit Level TAKS Mathematics Information Booklet, March 2007

algebra ii teks
Algebra II TEKS

Algebra II 11.33

(1) Foundations for functions. The student uses properties and attributes of functions and applies functions to problem situations. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the mathematical domains and ranges of functions and determine reasonable domain and range values for continuous and discrete situations; and

(B) collect and organize data, make and interpret scatterplots, fit the graph of a function to the data, interpret the results, and proceed to model, predict, and make decisions and critical judgments.

Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Title 19, Part II Chapter 111.33

project insertion into curriculm
Project Insertion Into Curriculm

The project will be done at the beginning of the second six weeks of the school year after the review of real number properties; simplifying and solving linear equations and inequalities; relations and functions; graphing linear equations; finding slope; writing equations of lines; parallel and perpendicular lines; direct variation; scatterplots; correlation; and regression curves.

materials for project
Materials for Project
  • Assorted lengths of balsa wood (Spars, 3 inch and 4 inch wide sheets)
  • Small hobby wheels or students make their own out of balsa wood
  • .032 inch wire and aluminum tubing for axles
  • Tape, glue, scissors, Exacto knife, and rubber bands
  • Pre-assembled solar panel with solar rated electric motor
  • TI84Plus calculator with CBLII and Ranger or CBRII
  • Spotlight (100 Watt)
solar car trials and measurements
Solar Car Trials And Measurements

http://education.ti.com/educationportal/sites/US/productHome/us_product.html

project goals products
Project Goals & Products
  • Student groups will use TI84Plus and Ranger technology to measure the car’s position vs. time
  • Student groups will use TI84Plus, CBL, and Light Sensor to measure light intensity at 6 inch intervals along the car’s route
  • Student groups will construct scatter plots with reasonable domain and range , calculate speed over different intervals, and fit a function to their scatter plot.
  • Student groups will make connections between speed and light intensity
pre and post testing
Pre and Post Testing
  • Pre and Post Test will be the same test
  • 20 Questions Covering the Following:
    • Engineering and lasers
    • Scatterplots
    • Slope
    • Correlation
    • Correlation Coefficient
    • Regression Curves
acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
  • Dr. Sy-Bor Wen, Assistant Professor
  • Young Kyong Jo, Ph. D. Student
  • Texas A&M University
  • Dwight Look College of Engineering
  • National Science Foundation
  • E3 Program Coordinators
  • E3 Participants
  • My wife for encouraging me to apply for E3