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The Power of Art: David ORQ

The Power of Art: David ORQ

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The Power of Art: David ORQ

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  1. The Power of Art: David ORQ • After you watch the video, answer the following two ORQ’s: • Analyze how the works of David exampled patriotic thought of Neoclassical Era France by: • Naming two of David’s Revolutionary works and describing them thoroughly. • Connect specific examples how each of those works showed patriotic thought of the Revolution. • Analyze how Napoleon used the works of David by: • Naming two works that Napoleon commissioned and describing them thoroughly. • Connect specific examples how Napoleon used each of those works.

  2. Humanities Schedule • Today – Enlightenment reading and make-up tests • Wednesday – ER – Neoclassical Notes • Thursday – The Power of Art: David ORQ • Friday – Neoclassical samples • Monday – Amadeus • Tuesday – Amadeus • Wednesday – Finish Amadeus – AmadeusReflection • Thursday – Test cards and binder checks • Friday – Club day – review samples • Monday & Tuesday – no school • Wednesday – Neoclassical test

  3. Neoclassical Arts

  4. Neo-classic Era Basics • Neo=new • “Age of Reason” – intellectual movement – ideas of Greece and Rome were inspiration • Marked by rationality, ethics, aesthetics, and knowledge • Get away from superstition (magic), irrationality, and tyranny of dark ages • Enlightenment – framework for American and French revolution

  5. Continued • Birth of capitalism, socialism, liberalism, and fascism • Arts important way of spreading knowledge and serving the state’s needs • State created arts academies – served the state’s needs and ideas • Created qualifications and diplomas – propaganda • Public museums and art galleries created – propaganda

  6. Visual arts

  7. Thomas Jefferson • Promoted Neo-Palladian style architect (Andrea Palladio – principles of classic Roman architecture) • Most of what Neoclassical architects knew about Roman architecture came from excavations of ruins (Pompeii)

  8. Monticello

  9. Capitol Building

  10. Neoclassicism in visual art Get away from Baroque Purity of Roman art/idealism of Greek art Neoclassical influences less evident in sculpture – most influence came from Greek art Sharp colors Clean lines (no Sfumato) Chiaroscuro (less though) Use of perspective Look of artificial light, almost like the theatre

  11. Jacques-Louis David • French • Inspired by Greeks and Romans • Many works were based on ancient history/mythology • Official artist of the French revolution/Napoleon’s court • Painted many portraits of revolutionary leaders • Served time in jail for participation in “The Terror” • Later exiled (Louis XVIII)

  12. The Classical Music Period (1720-1830)

  13. Classical Music • Polyphony replaced by homophonic music (melody supported by system of harmony) • Movement centered in/around Vienna • Begins in 1750’s and 60’s • Reached maturity in 70’s and 80’s – around the time of the American & French revolutions

  14. Mozart • First symphony (musical work made up of 4 movements separated by silence) at age 8 • Amadeus means “loved by God” • Austrian Emperor Joseph II accused his music of “too many notes” • Spread his reputation in Vienna by publishing, playing the piano and having an opera performed in 1782

  15. Mozart • Composed 15 piano concertos (composition for an orchestra and soloist) by 1786 • Served as composer and soloist in his works • Unable to finish his Requiem • Final compositions were the Clarinet Concertos • Possible causes of death – Flu, Mercury poisoning (medicine), Kidney illness, Rheumatic fever • Buried in a Vienna suburb with little ceremony and in an unmarked grave (even the second one he was buried in)

  16. Haydn • Trained as a choirboy • Became freelance musician and accompanist • Played violin and keyboard • Wrote sacred music, music for theatre comedies, and chamber music • Seen as the “father of the symphony and string quartet” – did not originate them • At his funeral in 1809 Mozart’s Requiem was performed

  17. Beethoven • Exact date of birth unknown (likely 12/16/1770) • Father gave instruction in piano, violin, and viola – later known for his piano virtuosity • First public concert was on March 26, 1778 at age 7 (same day as his death 49 years later) • 1802 – found out his impaired hearing was incurable and would worsen

  18. Beethoven • Became very productive despite hearing impairment • Aristocracy of Vienna supported him generously and were tolerant of his rude & insensitive manners, careless appearance, and towering rages • From end of 1790’s, he was no longer dependent on patronage for income • Sometimes took several years to refine an idea before satisfied

  19. Beethoven • Ideas usually written in sketchbooks which he constantly carried • Death in 1827 – said that 10,000 people were at his funeral • Became public figure before death – unlike any musicians before • Bridged classical of Mozart and Haydn with Romantic period that followed

  20. Moliere and Swift Satire – The Neoclassical Drama

  21. Satire • Making fun of current events or social structures through irony, sarcasm and wit • Makes fun of moral and social views

  22. Moliere • French actor and playwright • Master of Satire • Dance and drama were very important to the French aristocracy/helped him promote his art • Established his own acting troupe in the court of Louis XIV (1660) • Used physical humor inspired by Commedia dell’arte

  23. Moliere Continued • Used 5 act development as seen in Greek and Renaissance (Shakespeare) • Superstition – he collapsed during a presentation of The Imaginary Invalid and died later in his home – was wearing yellow on stage – seen as bad luck by some actors to wear yellow costumes on stage

  24. Summary • Write a 5-6 sentence summary for Neo-Classical Art