Career Advising to Enhance Student Success Ken Hughey, Professor Judy Hughey, Associate Professor Kansas State Univers - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Career Advising to Enhance Student Success Ken Hughey, Professor Judy Hughey, Associate Professor Kansas State Univers

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    1. Career Advising to Enhance Student Success Ken Hughey, Professor Judy Hughey, Associate Professor Kansas State University NACADA Conference, Orlando October 4, 2010 113

    2. Outcomes for the Session Career advising defined Career advising processes Making career advising integral to academic advising Resources to enhance career advising and contribute to students academic and career planning, development, and decision-making Vignettes

    3. Career Advising . . . Questions? Challenges? Issues?

    4. Gordon (2006) stated . . . All students need career advising, even those who enter college already decided on a major (p. 5).

    5. Career Advising Defined Career advising is a dynamic, interactive process that helps students understand how their personal interests, abilities, and values might predict success in the academic and career fields they are considering and how to form their academic and career goals accordingly (Gordon, 2006, p. 12). It is a process aimed at helping students effectively use information about themselves (e.g., interests, abilities, values, strengths) and the options available (e.g., majors, occupations, internships). Through the process, students integrate his information to set goals, make academic and career decisions, and develop plans to make meaning of their goals and decisions. (Hughey & Hughey, 2009, p. 6)

    6. Career Advising Can . . . Help students learn the skills needed for career decision making. Add value to students academic and career development and help to more effectively prepare them for the future. (Hughey & Hughey, 2009, p. 6)

    7. OBanion on Academic Advising OBanion (1972) stated, The purpose of academic advising is to help the student choose a program of study which will serve him in the development of his potential (p. 62). The process of academic advising includes the following dimensions: 1-exploration of life goals, 2-exploration of vocational goals, 3-program choice, 4-course choice, and 5-scheduling courses (OBanion, 1972, p. 62).

    8. Rationale for Career Advising Complexity of choices and factors involved in making decisions Changing economy, workplace, and competencies needed High school students aspirations and preparation for college work Many students need help with career and academic planning Students who are undecided Students who change majors Retention Numbers and diversity of students in higher education The need for career advising is clear; the challenge is to implement programs and services to enhance students academic and career planning and development (Hughey & Hughey, 2009, p. 13)

    9. Career Advising Competencies Mahoney (2009) stated, Today advising requires an extensive skill set and a wide array of informational resources. . . . This is especially true of career advising that requires a robust and diverse set of competencies (p. 48). Categories of competencies 1-Conceptual 2-Informational 3-Relational 4-Personal

    10. Understanding the Context The Changing Workplace & Economy As the increasingly competitive global workplace receives more college graduates, those receiving academic and career advising can better utilize their strengths and find greater opportunity to succeed and find satisfaction. As a result, the need to integrate academic and career advising has become indispensible. (Feller & OBruba, 2009, p. 44) Career Coaching Clients to Success: 10 Lifelong Career Rules

    11. Making Career Advising Integral to Academic Advising The goals of making career advising integral to academic advising are to support students development, prepare them for the future, empower them to manage career options in a changing world, and become contributing members of society (McCalla-Wriggins, Hughey, Damminger, & Nelson, 2009, p. 297).

    12. The 3-I Process 1Inquire 2Inform 3Integrate (Gordon, 2006)

    13. Inquire The INQUIRE phase of the decision-making process involves identifying students academic and career concerns, clarifying their needs, and making appropriate responses that help them move to the information-collecting phase. (Gordon, 2006, p. 47)

    14. Inform The acquisition and effective use of educational and career information is an integral part of academic advising. Students need information about their personal attributes, educational information, and occupational information. (Gordon, 2006, p. 63)

    15. Integrate In the INTEGRATE phase, advisors and students determine what additional assistance is needed to help students organize and make meaningful connections between the information sources they have collected. (Gordon, 2006, p. 79)

    16. Career Advising Questions 1--What do you want to do? 2--What is stopping you from doing it? 3--What are you doing about it? (Figler & Bolles, 2007, p. 106)

    17. Career Advising Questions How can I help you 1. discover what motivates you . . . what gets the best out of you? 2. become curious and innovative (entrepreneurial thoughts/ideas)? 3. get the people skills needed to work in teams/cooperate/inspire? 4. get the oral skills you need to persuade/change anothers attitude or opinion? 5. embrace technology (productivity)?

    18. Career Advising Questions (cont.) gain higher math and science competencies without saying uncle? practice business writing (regardless of field, the more responsibility gained the more persuading others in writing using documentation is valued)? see education is a means to develop competencies not an end in itself (lifelong learning)? read, travel, and experiment with new environments to see beyond present boundaries? see that polished effort looks a lot like ability? (Feller & OBruba, 2009, p. 41)

    19. Theories to Inform Career and Academic Advising Hollands Theory of Types and Person-Environment Interactions Supers Life-Span, Life-Space Career Theory Cognitive Information Processing Social Learning Theory of Career Decision Making & Planned Happenstance Chickerings Theory of Identity Development Strengths-based Advising Developmental Advising

    20. Knowledge Resources Self-Directed Searchwww.self-directed-search.com Career Interests Gamehttp://career.missouri.edu/students/majors-careers/skills-interests/career-interest-game/ Career Zonehttp://www.nycareerzone.org/graphic/index.jsp World-of-Work Mapwww.act.org/wwm/counselor.html Strengthsquesthttp://www.strengthsquest.com

    21. Knowledge Resources Occupational Outlook Handbookhttp://www.bls.gv/OCO/ O*NEThttp://www.onetcenter.org/ GradSchools.comhttp://www.gradschools.com What can I do with a major in . . .? http://www.k-state.edu/acic/majorin/ What can I do with a major in . . .? http://www.uncwil.edu/stuaff/career/Majors/index.htm Match Major Sheets http://www.career.fsu.edu/occupations/matchmajor/index.html Riley Guidehttp://www.rileyguide.com/ What Color Is Your Parachutehttp://www.jobhuntersbible.com/

    22. Career Decision-Making Resources Choosing a Major or Occupation http://career.fsu.edu/education/majors/choosing-a-major-guide.html The Career Guide http://www.career.fsu.edu/advising/guides.html

    23. Career Decision-Making Resources

    24. Career Decision-Making Resources Major Decisions (Penn State) http://www.psu.edu/dus/md/mdweb.htm Major Exploration (University of Arizona) http://www.universitycollege.arizona.edu/major_expl/ Career One-Stop http://www.careeronestop.org/ Career Videos (Career One-Stop) http://www.careerinfonet.org/videos/COS_videos_by_cluster.asp?id=27&nodeid=28

    25. Career Decision-Making Resources DISCOVER http://www.act.org/discover/ Career Development and Planning: A Comprehensive Approach (3rd ed.) Reardon, Sampson, Peterson, & Lenz

    26. Career Centers Florida State University http://www.career.fsu.edu/index.html University of Missouri http://career.missouri.edu/ Kansas State University, Academic and Career Information Center http://www.k-state.edu/acic/ Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis http://uc.iupui.edu/students/career/index.asp

    27. Exemplary Practices Integrated Academic & Career Advising Centers Brigham Young Universityhttp://ccc.byu.edu James Madison Universityhttp://www.jmu.edu/cap Kutztown Universityhttp://www.kutztown.edu/academics/advisement Northern Arizona Universityhttp://www.nau.edu/gateway State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) http://www.oswego.edu/compass Thiel Collegehttp://www.thiel.edu/cla

    28. Vignette of Caitlyn Caitlyn entered the university as a nursing major. She has always wanted to be a nurse and volunteered in a hospital all through high school. However, she received notice a month ago that her application to the nursing program was rejected. She thinks this was because her low chemistry grades brought down her GPA. She has been depressed since receiving the letter and has difficulty accepting her situation. She has considered dropping out of college. She is totally lost in considering her next steps. (Gordon, 2006, p. 131)

    29. Vignette of Peppermint Patty Peppermint Patty came to college to obtain a business degree and then a good, high paying job in business after graduation. At the end of her second year of college, she visits her advisor in a very agitated state. She has just learned that she has not been accepted into the School of Business. While her GPA is fairly good, her grades in math and accounting fell significantly below the accepted grades of the Business School. She is determined to work in the business world after graduation so asks for advice on what she should do to achieve this goal. She is considering quitting school or transferring to another school in the hope of getting into a different Business School. She asks if she has any other options. What is the first step you would take with Peppermint? (University of Wisconsin System, 2010, Academic Affairs Academic and Career Advising Task Force)

    30. Career Advising Professional Resources

    31. By providing career advising interventions that draw on theory, are developmentally and contextually appropriate, make use of evidence-based techniques, and promote the acquisition or development of academic and workplace success skills, attitudes, and behaviors, advisors are promoting the long-term academic and career success of their students. (Gore & Metz, 2008, p. 113)

    32. Contributing to Students Development and Success Through career advising as an integral part of academic advising, advisors contribute to students development as people and professionals. (Hughey & Hughey, 2009, p. 15) Feller and OBruba (2009), . . . argued that the economy, the workplace, and the attributes of success have changed to such a degree that innovation and creativity within higher education and specifically advising must change to respond to meet new needs (p. 43).

    33. Bibliography Brown, S.D., & Lent, R.W. (Eds.). (2005). Career development and counseling: Putting theory and research to work. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Carr, D.L., & Epstein, S.A. (2009). Information resources to enhance career advising. In K.F. Hughey, D. Burton Nelson, J.K. Damminger, B. McCalla-Wriggins, & Associates, Handbook of career advising (pp. 146-181). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Clifton, D.O., Anderson, E., & Schreiner, L.A. (2006). StrengthsQuest: Discover and develop your strengths in academics, career, and beyond (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: The Gallup Organization. Feller, R., & OBruba, B. (2009). The evolving workplace: Integrating academic and career advising. In K.F. Hughey, D. Burton Nelson, J.K. Damminger, B. McCalla-Wriggins, & Associates, Handbook of career advising (pp. 19-47). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Figler, H., & Bolles, R. N. (2007). The career counselors handbook (2nd ed.). Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press. Gordon, V.N. (2005). What is your career advising IQ? Academic Advising Today, 28(4). Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/AAT/NW28_4.htm Gordon, V.N. (2006). Career advising: An academic advisors guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Gordon, V.N. (2007). The undecided college student: An academic and career advising challenge. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas. Gordon, V.N., & Sears, S.J. (2010). Selecting a college major: Exploration and decision making (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Gore, P.A., Jr., & Metz, A.J. (2008). Advising for career and life planning. In V.N. Gordon, W R. Habley, T.J. Grites, & Associates, Academic advising: A comprehensive handbook (2nd ed., pp. 103-117). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

    34. Gysbers, N.C., Heppner, M.J., & Johnston, J.A. (2009). Career counseling: Contexts, processes, and techniques (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association. Hughey, K.F., Burton Nelson, D., Damminger, J.K., McCalla Wriggins, B., & Associates. (2009). The handbook of career advising. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Hughey, K.F., & Hughey, J.K. (2009). Foundations of career advising. In K.F. Hughey, D. Burton Nelson, J.K. Damminger, B. McCalla-Wriggins, & Associates, Handbook of career advising (pp. 1-18). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Krumbotlz, J.D. (2009). The happenstance learning theory. Journal of Career Assessment, 17, 135-154. Krumboltz, J.D., & Levin, A.S. (2004). Luck is no accident: Making the most of happenstance in your life and career. Atascadero, CA: Impact Publishers. McCalla-Wriggins, B., Hughey, K.F., Damminger, J.K., & Burton Nelson, D. (2009). Career advising: Challenges, opportunities, and recommendations for the future. In K.F. Hughey, D. Burton Nelson, J.K. Damminger, B. McCalla-Wriggins, & Associates, Handbook of career advising (pp. 293-305). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Mitchell, K.E., Levin, A.S., Krumboltz, J.D. (1999). Planned happenstance: Constructing unexpected career opportunities. Journal of Counseling & Development, 77, 115-124.

    35. Niles, S.G., & Harris-Bowlsbey, J. (2009). Career development interventions in the 21st century (3nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall. Niles, S.G., & Hutchison, B. (2009). Theories of career development to inform advising. In K.F. Hughey, D. Burton Nelson, J.K. Damminger, B. McCalla Wriggins, & Assocites, The handbook of career advising (pp. 68-96). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. OBanion, T. (1972). An academic advising model. Junior College Journal, 42(6), 62-69. Parsons, F. (1909). Choosing a vocation. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Reardon, R., & Bullock, E. (2004). Hollands Theory and implications for academic advising and career counseling. NACADA Journal, 24(1&2), 111-122. Reardon, R.C., Lenz, J.G., Sampson, J.P., Jr., & Peterson, G.W. (2009). Career development and planning: A comprehensive approach (3rd ed.). Florence, KY: Cengage Publishing. Sampson, J.P., Jr., Reardon, R.C., Peterson, G.W., & Lenz, J.G. (2004). Career counseling & services: A cognitive information processing approach. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. Schreiner, L., & Anderson, E. (2005). Strengths-based advising: A new lens for higher education. NACADA Journal, 25(2), 20-29. Steele, G. (2003). A research-based approach to working with undecided students: A case study illustration. NACADA Journal, 23(1&2), 10-20. Steele, G.E., & McDonald, M.L. (2008). Moving through college. In V.N. Gordon, W.R. Habley, T.J. Grites, & Associates, Academic advising: A comprehensive handbook (2nd ed., pp. 157-177). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

    36. Contact Information Ken Hughey, PhD Judy Hughey, EdD Professor & Chair Associate Professor 785-532-6445 785-532-5527 khughey@ksu.edu jhughey@ksu.edu Special Education, Counseling, & Student Affairs Kansas State University Manhattan, KS