Chapter 5 Motivation and Emotion: Driving Consumer Behavior - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Chapter 5 Motivation and Emotion: Driving Consumer Behavior

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Chapter 5 Motivation and Emotion: Driving Consumer Behavior
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Chapter 5 Motivation and Emotion: Driving Consumer Behavior

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  1. Chapter 5Motivation and Emotion:Driving Consumer Behavior BABIN / HARRIS © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  2. Learning Outcomes Define motivation (what initiates human behavior), and classify basic consumer motivations. Understand how companies go about discovering consumers’ motivations. Define emotion and understand how to measure consumer emotions. Define the concept of schema-based affect. LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  3. Motivations LO1 • The inner reasons or driving forces behind human action as consumers are driven to address real needs. • Human motivations are oriented toward two key groups of behavior: • Homeostasis – the body naturally reacts in a way so as to maintain a constant, normal blood stream. • Self-improvement – changing one’s current state to a level that is more ideal. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  4. Classifying basic consumer motivations LO1 Two useful motivation theories are: • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs • A general theory designed to account for most human behavior in general terms. • McGuire’s Psychological Motives • A fairly detailed set of motives used to account for specific aspects of consumer behavior. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  5. Exhibit 5.1: Consumer Motivations According to Maslow’s Hierarchy LO1 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  6. Maslow’s Needs in the Ad Message LO1 Example of an appeal to safety needs

  7. Maslow’s Needs in the Ad Message LO1 Example of an appeal to self-actualization needs

  8. McGuire’s Psychological Motives LO1 • McGuire developed a classification with16 categories • Based on cognitive (thinking) and affective (feeling) motives: • Cognitive-based motives imply that consumers select goals based on totally objective criteria such as size, weight, price, or miles per gallon • Affective motives imply the selection of goals according to personal or subjective criteria

  9. Exhibit 5.2: Utilitarian and Hedonic Motivations Lead to Consumer Behaviors LO1 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  10. Selected Psychological Motives from McGuire: LO1 • Need for Consistency: individual’s desire to have all parts of oneself consistent with each other (attitudes, opinions, self-images, views of others) • Need for Affiliation: need for friendship, acceptance, and belonging; group membership • 3. Need for Independence and Individuality: characteristic of American culture; unique products and services; owning something “Different” © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  11. Represents the degree of personal relevance a consumer finds in pursuing value from a given consumption act. Types: Product Shopping Situational Enduring Emotional Consumer Involvement LO1 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  12. Emotional Involvement Example LO1 Is this high involvement or irrational behavior? © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  13. LO2 Discovering Consumer Motivations Manifest motives are motives that are known and freely admitted. Latent motives are either unknown to the consumer or are such that he/she is reluctant to admit them. Projective techniques are designed to provide information on latent motives. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  14. Motivation Theory and Marketing Strategy LO2 Latent and Manifest Motives in a Purchase Situation © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  15. Motivation Theory and Marketing Strategy LO2 Selected Product Personality Profiles Uncovered by Motivation Research Techniques Baking An expression of femininity and motherhood, baking evokes pleasant nostalgic memories of the odors pervading the house when one’s mother was baking. To man, a woman is subconsciously and symbolically going through the act of giving birth when baking a cake, and the most fertile moment occurs when the baked product is pulled out of the oven. Ice Cream Ice cream is associated with love and affection. It derives particular potency from childhood memories, when it was given to a child for being “good” and withheld as an instrument of punishment. people refer to ice cream as something they “love” to eat. Ice cream is a symbol of abundance; people prefer round packaging with an illustration that runs around the box panel because it suggests unlimited quantity. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  16. Emotion Terminology LO3 • Emotion – a strong, relatively uncontrolled feeling that affects behavior • Mood – a transient (temporary and changing) and general affective state. • Affect – represents the feelings a consumer has about a particular product or activity. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  17. Measuring Emotion LO3 Autonomic measures Self-report measures © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  18. Exhibit 5.6: A Short-Form PANAS Application LO3 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  19. LO4 Define the concept of schema-based affect. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  20. Exhibit 5.8: Illustration of Emotion Aiding Learning LO4 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  21. Nostalgia LO4 Going retro - Nostalgia creates positive feelings. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  22. Schema-Based Affect LO4 Emotions become stored as part of the meaning for a category. © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  23. Exhibit 5.9: A Typical Car Salesperson Schema LO4 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  24. Exhibit 5.10: Examples of Schema-Based Affect LO4 © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.

  25. Emotional Contagion LO4 • Represents the extent to which an emotional display by one person influences the emotional state of a bystander. • Emotional labor – workers have to overtly manage their own emotional displays as part of the requirements of the job. Ex: flight attendants © 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.