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Columns

Columns. Digital Journalism DASA. Columns. In a news story, the reporter is simply a provider of facts and quotes from news sources. In a column, the writer’s opinion, along with supportive facts, forms the story.

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Columns

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  1. Columns Digital Journalism DASA

  2. Columns • In a news story, the reporter is simply a provider of facts and quotes from news sources. In a column, the writer’s opinion, along with supportive facts, forms the story. • Some examples of column topics are: news school policies, things that need improvement and daily life in the school.

  3. Types of Columns • Personal or Interpretive Columns. The personal or interpretive column in high school papers observes and interprets life at school from the prospective of an insightful writer. • Humorous columns. Sometimes you can raise awareness through the use of humor. • Personal or Interpretive Columns. Personal experiences and their interpretations. • Lifestyle Columns. Topics range from music to fashion, fads to television programs.

  4. What makes a column interesting? • A column should be written to attract a broad cross-section of readers. • It must have unique ideas that are appealing, entertaining, and insightful. • A good column “speaks” to readers. • Do not use big words and long sentences.

  5. How to write a column • Have a strong lead to grab the reader’s attention. • The middle or heart of the column contains all the supporting material for the point you are making. This information can include statistics, quotes from news sources, or simply well-reasoned arguments. You need a feel for all sides of an issue, then you know what points to argue against. • End. It should leave the reader thinking about the topic.

  6. Class Work • Using your textbooks read and summarize the different types of columns. Pages 213-218.

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