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  1. Place your midterm stories on the desk at the front

  2. On a piece of notebook paper, list everything that you can think of that you want out of life.

  3. http://todaysmeet.com/hewellbl41017 -Visit the above URL on your smartphone/other device. -Type either your full name OR your full student number and click “join.” -Only those students who use this site have permission to have their electronics out in class.

  4. Graffiti talk: Write some of the things that you want/need on the white-board. (Alternative: You can write your ideas on the todaysmeet site, too.)

  5. Go to your journal topic. Put a star beside all of the things that you believe you deserve* or are entitled to. (*things that you deserve right now as opposed to things you may deserve in the future)

  6. On your paper, underline all of the things that you would be willing to commit a nonviolent crime to obtain. Circle all of the things that you would be willing to commit a violent crime to obtain.

  7. Poverty KWL Chart K: What you know about poverty W: What you want to know about poverty. L: Leave blank. We’ll fill in what we learned about poverty later.

  8. Homework: Find an article that talks about a subject related to poverty. Make sure that it’s an article that you can read and explain to the rest of class.

  9. Email me the link to your article before you arrive to class on Monday.thewell@rockdale.k12.ga.us

  10. Unacceptable: Wikipedia articles; Dictionary.com articles or similar;Yahoo! Answers articles/Ask.com articles or similar.

  11. Acceptable: Articles from reputable news sources (US News, CNN, New York Times, Reuters, BBC, etc); Articles from scholarly journals;

  12. Homecoming Campaigns

  13. The Toulmin Model for Arguments Oct 21, 2013 Agenda: -EQ: What are the parts of an argument and how do they fit together? -Notes on claims, grounds, and warrants -Demonstration of Toulmin Model -Begin Argument Posters (groups of 3)

  14. Claim: Your point Not always directly stated (but it should be!)

  15. Grounds (Data): Your proof. Can come in the form of logic, citing sources, statistics, etc.

  16. Warrant: The logic that links your grounds to your claim. Not always directly stated (implicit warrant). When it is, it makes your argument stronger (explicit warrant).

  17. An argument with a student

  18. Student: Open the door! Hewell: No. Student: Come on, man! Hewell: Go get a pass. Student: But my stuff’s in there! I just went to the bathroom! Hewell: So? Student: I’m not late!

  19. Hewell: Yes, you are. Go get a pass. Student: No, I’m not! I got there on time! See? My stuff’s right there! Another student: That is his stuff. Student: See? Hewell: You’re not in the room now. Student: But my stuff is! Hewell: Pass. Student: That ain’t fair!

  20. Claim: Your point Grounds/Data: Proof/evidence/support for claim. Warrant: The logic that links the grounds to the claim.

  21. Claim: Mr. Hewell is behaving unfairly.

  22. Claim: Mr. Hewell is behaving unfairly. Grounds: Because he is making the student get a pass.

  23. Warrants: -Students who are on time do not have to get a pass. -The student was on time -By making a student who is on time get a pass, Mr. Hewell is behaving unfairly.

  24. NEW Claim: The student was on time.

  25. NEW Claim: The student was on time. Grounds: Because his stuff is in the room.

  26. Warrants: -The student is expected to arrive at the classroom before the bell rings to be on time. -The student’s stuff proves that he arrived before the bell rang. -The student does not have to be physically present in the classroom to be considered “on time.”

  27. NEW NEW Claim: The student does not have to be physically present in the classroom to be considered on time.

  28. NEW NEW Claim: The student does not have to be physically present in the classroom to be considered on time. Grounds: [RCPS/Salem High School guidelines defining tardiness.]

  29. Interesting Note: The RCPS Guidelines are fairly vague on the subject of tardies. Vagueness of this sort almost always means that the teacher can decide what does and does not define tardiness.

  30. Interesting Note Continued: In this case, the student probably won’t win this fight. He would be better off arguing that an official definition for tardiness be established. This is why so many people argue about bills in Congress!

  31. Warrants: -RCPS or [source] is a reliable resource for defining tardiness -The building (in general) universally adheres to this definition of tardiness.

  32. Your Task: 1. On the piece of white paper, write the script to an argument.Min 15 Lines of Dialogue. Do Not Write out the Claims, Grounds, or Warrants of your arguments

  33. Your Task: 2. List out the claims, grounds, and warrants of the argument on a piece of paper.

  34. The Toulmin Model (Continued) October 23, 2013 Agenda for the day: -EQ: What are the parts of an argument and how do they fit together? -Review/Practice Toulmin Model -Finish argument posters -Poster Walk -Present analysis of poster arguments

  35. Get out your notes from last class on the Toulmin Model

  36. Write the following on your paper: No more phones  Kids can take pictures of students with out the students permission. They would post the pictures on social networks and bully them around. They would get distracted and not pay attention in class. The students would text each other answers to tests. If don't allow cellphones many school issues would be solved.[http://www.debate.org/opinions/should-students-be-allowed-to-use-cell-phones-in-school]

  37. Identify the claim, grounds, and warrants of the statement. Identify which warrants are weak and which ones are strong.

  38. Last class’s assignment: Write an argument between two students. Min Length: 15 Lines (1stpd*) You will be given time to finish your arguments.

  39. You need your own individual paper for this one: Go to your assigned poster. Identify the claims, grounds, and warrants present in each poster.