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Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems Roger Geertsema DVM, DACLAM, DAVCPM. Vivarium with Individual Ventilated Cages (IVC) for rodents with cage exhaust directly ventilated out of room

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Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems

Roger Geertsema DVM, DACLAM, DAVCPM

background

Vivarium with Individual Ventilated Cages (IVC) for rodents with cage exhaust directly ventilated out of room

  • Tecniplast IVC with positive pressure cages (70% cage exhaust rate)

Background

specific aims

Can room ventilation rates be safely lowered in rodent rooms utilizing direct exhaust individually-ventilated caging (IVC)

    • Air quality within the room that could have an occupational health or animal wellbeing effect
    • Changes in intracage environmental conditions that could impact animal wellbeing or complicate research results

Specific Aims

study design

8 rodent rooms 7 mouse rooms

    • 1 rat room
  • 2 ventilation rates Low: 5 – 6 ACH
    • High: 10 – 12 ACH

Study Design

study design1

Compare Low vs. High room ventilation rates for:

    • Room CO2 (difference between supply - exhaust air)
    • Room Dew Point Temperature (difference between supply - exhaust air)
    • Room Mouse Allergen (Musm1)
    • Room Endotoxin
    • Intracage Ammonia, CO2, Temperature, and Humidity
    • Create a controlled spill of EtOH in room
      • Evaluate the peak level and amount of time to return to baseline at Low vs. High ventilation

Study Design

demand controlled ventilation dcv

Computer controlled Phoenix valves in supply and room exhaust

  • Monitoring of room air quality for temperature, dew point temperature, CO2, dust particles, and Total Volatile Organic Chemicals (TVOC)
  • Sample taken every 15 min. from room exhaust, not the cage exhaust
  • Ability to increase ventilation rate based on monitoring parameters

Demand-Controlled Ventilation (DCV)

summary of results

Low ventilation rate:

    • Slightly increased level of CO2
    • Slightly increased Dew Point Temperature
    • Increased time to clear a VOC spill (demand-controlled ventilation will mitigate this)
  • No difference in:
    • Musm1
    • Endotoxin
    • Intracageammonia, CO2, temperature, and humidity

Summary of Results

conclusions

It is safe to lower the room ventilation rate to 5 – 6 ACH both for human workers and animals with a direct exhaust IVC system that is properly designed and maintained - This may not apply to all IVC systems

    • Although some statistically significant effects were observed, air quality still well within acceptable guidelines(ASHRAE limit for CO2 in room airis 1000 ppm)
  • With a demand-controlled ventilation system, the air is cleared of a spilled VOC faster (assuming the VOC is able to be detected by the system)

Conclusions

acknowledgements

ACLAM Foundation Grant

  • Dr. Lindsell, Matthew Gudorf, Alvin Samala, Scott Smith, & Michael Phelan

Acknowledgements