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Two Societies at War: Mobilization, Resources, and Internal Dissent. The D.C. Emancipation Act. April 16, 1862 a bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia was signed by President Abraham Lincoln. The law provided for: immediate emancipation

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the d c emancipation act
The D.C. Emancipation Act
  • April 16, 1862 a bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia was signed by President Abraham Lincoln.
  • The law provided for:
    • immediate emancipation
    • compensation of up to $300 for each slave to loyal Unionist masters
    • voluntary colonization of former slaves to colonies outside the United States
    • payments of up to $100 to each person choosing emigration.
  • The District of Columbia Emancipation Act is the only example of compensated emancipation in the United States.
the emancipation proclamation
The Emancipation Proclamation
  • President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863
  • It applied only to states that had seceded from the Union.
  • It expressly exempted parts of the Confederacy under Northern control.
  • The freedom it promised depended upon Union military victory.
  • It accepted black men into the Union Army and Navy.
  • Almost 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought for the Union and freedom.
the conscription act of 1863
The Conscription Act of 1863
  • Was the first conscription legislation in American history.
  • Service could be avoided by paying a fee or finding a substitute.
  • Terms of the Act:
    • Military obligation imposed on males aged 20-45
    • Federal agency had jurisdiction over all Union states
    • The US was divided into 185 military districts
    • Men were enlisted for 3 years or until the end of the war, which ever came first
    • commutation fees or substitutes were accepted
    • exemptions were granted
new york city draft riots
New York City Draft Riots
  • On Saturday, July 11, 1863, the first lottery of the conscription law was held.
  • On Monday, July 13, 1863, between 6 and 7 A.M., the five days of mayhem and bloodshed that would be known as the Civil War Draft Riots began.
  • The rioters' targets initially included only military and governmental buildings.
  • By afternoon of the first day, some of the rioters had turned to attacks on black people, and on things symbolic of black political, economic, and social power.
  • Rioters lynched eleven black men over the five days of mayhem. The riots forced hundreds of blacks out of the city
horatio seymour
Horatio Seymour
  • New York governor Horatio Seymour's famous "My Friends" speech was delivered from the steps of New York's City Hall during the draft riots.
  • The riots broke out as a result of the Conscription Act that was highly discriminatory to the lower classes.
  • Although not an enthusiast of President Lincoln's war policies, Seymour actually rushed to the scene of the riots and tried to restore order.
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Multimedia Citations
  • Slide 2: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/dc_emancipation_act/images/emancipation_act_01.jpg
  • Slide 3: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3b50000/3b53000/3b53000/3b53030r.jpg
  • Slide 4: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3b00000/3b03000/3b03600/3b03672r.jpg
  • Slide 5: http://img.search.com/thumb/6/67/Riot63.JPG/300px-Riot63.JPG
  • Slide 6: http://memory.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3b40000/3b42000/3b42400/3b42499r.jpg