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Civics and Economics. Concept-Based Planning. Course Pacing. Course Pacing. Unit Planner. Conceptual Lens: Values and Beliefs. Unit 1: Foundations and Development of American Government. Micro Concepts Immigration Colonialism Adaptation Mercantilism Egalitarianism

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civics and economics

Civics and Economics

Concept-Based Planning

slide4

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Values and Beliefs

Unit 1: Foundations and

Developmentof American Government

  • Micro Concepts
  • Immigration
  • Colonialism
  • Adaptation
  • Mercantilism
  • Egalitarianism
  • Social Contract
  • Revolution
  • Democracy
  • Macro Concepts
  • Power
  • Authority
  • Conflict
  • Freedom
  • Justice
  • Standards and Objectives
  • Standard: CE.C&G.1 - Analyze the foundations and development of American government in terms of principles and values
  • Clarifying Objectives: CE.C&G. 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5
slide5

Conceptual Lens: Values and Beliefs

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

Why did Americans

reject monarchy?

  • Guiding Questions
  • What caused the American Revolution?
  • On what principles is the US government based and where did the ideas come from?
  • What is the connection between the Revolution and the major principles the Founding Fathers placed in the UnitedStates Constitution?
  • What was the Articles of Confederation and why was it abandoned?
  • Who were the Federalists and the Antifederalists and what did they want?
  • Describe the US Constitution: how it is organized, what it contains, and how it grants authority.
  • Describe the Bill of Rights: what is in it and what is its purpose?
  • Instructional Sequence
  • The American Revolution: Rejecting Monarchy
  • Trial and Error: From Confederation to Constitution
  • Analyzing the US Constitution
  • Analyzing the Bill of Rights
slide6

Conceptual Lens: Values and Beliefs

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

When people immigrate, their values, beliefs, and institutions often change.

No system of government is entirely new; it is always influenced by ideas andpractices of the past.

People may revolt against a government if they believe it to be detrimental to their well-being OR if they believe its authority to be illegitimate.

A nation’s government reflects its values and beliefs.

A nation’s government reflects the distribution of power within its population.

Economic disadvantage can lead to social conflict.

slide7

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Hierarchy

Unit 2: American

Systems of Government

  • Micro Concepts
  • Federalism
  • Popular Sovereignty
  • Limited Government
  • Civil Liberties
  • Civil Rights
  • Loose and Strict Construction
  • Macro Concepts
  • Government systems
  • Hierarchy/Structure
  • Power
  • Rights
  • Adaptation/Change

Standards and Objectives

Standard: CE.C&G.2 - Analyze government systems within the United States in terms of their structure, function, and relationships.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.C&E.2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7

slide8

Conceptual Lens: Hierarchy

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

What is Federalism?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • Federalism: what it is and why it was adopted
  • National Government: structure and powers
  • State Government: structure and powers
  • Local Government: structure and powers
  • The US Constitution: a “living” document

Guiding Questions

What is the purpose of government in a democracy?

What is federalism and why did the US adopt a federal formof government?

How are federal, state, and local governments organized?

What powers are exercised by each level of government?

How do governments evolve and adapt to change?

slide9

Conceptual Lens: Hierarchy

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

Constitutions exist not only to organize governments but also to limit them.

Governments are structured in ways that enable them to carry out their basic functions.

In the United States, local, state, and federal governments form a web of overlapping authority that serves to disperse, decentralize, and limit power.

The structure of the national government and state governments is parallel, but the authority is hierarchical.

Governments must be allowed a degree of flexibility, or they cannot adapt to change.

slide10

Conceptual Lens: Power and Authority

Unit Planner

Unit 3: The American

Legal System

  • Micro Concepts
  • Due Process
  • Equal Protection
  • Rule of Law
  • Judicial Review
  • Macro Concepts
  • Justice
  • Power/Authority
  • Limited Government
  • Rights
  • Equality

Standards and Objectives

Standard: CE.C&G.3 – Analyze the legal system of the United States in terms of the development, execution, and protection of citizenship rights at all levels of government.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.C&G.3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 5.2

slide11

Conceptual Lens: Power and Authority

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

How well does the American legal system

maintain equilibrium between individual

rights and government authority?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • Purpose and types of laws
  • How laws are made and enforced
  • The judicial system: how it is organized
  • The judicial system: civil and criminal procedure
  • The Bill of Rights and due process
  • Judicial review and major Supreme Court decisions

Guiding Questions

What is the purpose of laws?

How are laws made at the national, state, and local levels?

What are the different kinds of laws?

Who enforces laws?

What is the structure of the American court system?

What procedures govern civil and criminal cases?

What is judicial review?

How has the Supreme Court’s power of judicial reviewshaped American law?

What is “due process” and how is it applied?

slide12

Conceptual Lens: Power and Authority

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

Societies cannot exist without laws.

Laws exist both to control the actions of citizens and to impose limits on government.

Most citizens will respect the law if they view it as fair.

In a democracy, voters influence the laws through their elected representatives.

There are different types of laws (civil, criminal, juvenile, regulatory) with different agencies, courts, and procedures to ensure their enforcement.

slide13

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Inclusion

Unit 4: Citizenship

  • Micro Concepts
  • Duties and Responsibilities
  • Multiculturalism
  • Immigration/Migration
  • Inclusion/Exclusion
  • Discrimination
  • Activism
  • Macro Concepts
  • Citizenship
  • Democracy
  • Movement
  • Identity
  • Power

Standards and Objectives

Standard: CE.C&G.4 – Understand how democracy depends upon the active participation of citizens.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.C&G.4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5

slide14

Conceptual Lens: Inclusion

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

What is an American?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • How citizenship is conferred
  • Current demographics
  • Immigration and national identity
  • Rights of citizens; duties and responsibilities of citizens
  • Equality and Citizenship: a history

Guiding Questions

Who can be a US citizen?

What is the current demographic make-up of the USpopulation?

How has immigration shaped the American national identity?

What values have shaped the American national identity?

What are the rights, duties, and responsibilities of US citizens?

Why does democracy depend on the active participation of citizens?

What is mean by the terms “rule of law” and “equal protectionof the law”?

How can government either impede equality or foster it? When have governments in the United States done both?

slide15

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Inclusion

Enduring Understandings

United States citizenship carries with it important privileges, duties, and responsibilities.

For a democracy to function, citizens must understand and acknowledge their roles.

An “American” national identity can be difficult to define, but some bedrock values and beliefs are enduring.

Immigration has had a profound impact on American national identity.

Citizenship rights have not been equally experienced throughout American history.

The long struggle by marginalized groups for equal citizenship continues to the present.

slide16

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Influence

Unit 5: Conflict Resolution

In a Democracy

  • Micro Concepts
  • Elections
  • Popular Sovereignty
  • Politics
  • Persuasion
  • Macro Concepts
  • Political systems
  • Conflict
  • Leadership
  • Influence
  • Beliefs/Values

Standards and Objectives

Standard: CE.C&G.5 – Analyze how political and legal systems within and outside of the United States provide a means to balance competing interests and resolve conflicts.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.C&G.5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 2.7, 2.8, 3.6

slide17

Conceptual Lens: Influence

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

How are conflicts resolved

in a democracy?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • Political parties: why they formed and what they do
  • Elections
  • Interest groups, public opinion, and government agencies
  • Current public issues

Guiding Questions

What is the two-party system and how/why did it develop?

What distinguishes the two major parties?

What is the role of third parties?

How are elections conducted at the national, state, and locallevels?

How do elected officials help resolve conflicts?

How do citizens implement laws and influence government policy?

How are laws influenced by political parties, interest groups, the media, and public opinion?

What are the major issues that divide Americans and how are they resolved?

slide18

Conceptual Lens: Influence

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

The nature of party is adversarial, but democracy functions through compromise. There is always tension between the two.

People and institutions support political parties/candidates for a variety of reasons.

The two-party system of the United States poses unique advantages and disadvantages compared to other political systems.

US elections are governed by guidelines and procedures that ensure legitimacy.

In a democracy, elected officials should represent the will of the electorate, however it may be difficult to (1) identify public opinion and (2) translate it into coherent public policy.

Political activism is the right of every American and can take many forms.

slide19

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Economic Systems

Unit 6: Macroeconomics

  • Micro Concepts
  • Capitalism
  • Market Forces
  • Competition
  • Regulation
  • Policy
  • Macro Concepts
  • Economic Systems
  • Resources
  • Scarcity
  • Wealth
  • Power/Control

Standards and Objectives

Standards: CE.E.1 – Understand economies,markets, and the role economic factors play in making economic decisions. CE.E.3 – Analyze the role of government and economic institutions in developing and implementing economic stabilization policies in the US.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.E.1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3

slide20

Conceptual Lens: Economic Systems

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

How do economic systems work?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • Scarcity and resources: meeting needs and wants
  • The nature of money and the creation of basic economic systems
  • Modern economic systems and their characteristics
  • How capitalism works
  • The role of government in a market economy

Guiding Questions

How do communities determine how to allocate resources?

What is money?

What is an economy?

What kinds of economic systems exist?

How is a community’s economy related to freedom?

What are the characteristics of a market economy?

What is the role of government in a market economy?

slide21

Conceptual Lens: Economic Systems

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

All societies have resources, needs, wants, and scarcity; all societies have economic systems.

The relative wealth or poverty of a society is mainly the result of its collective decision-making.

In a market economy, the primary incentive is profit and the primary regulator is competition.

The behavior of market economies is mostly dictated by the decisions of individuals and business, however government plays an important role.

slide22

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Choices

Unit 7: Microeconomics

  • Micro Concepts
  • Budgeting
  • Risk
  • Saving and Investment
  • Credit and Debt
  • Consumer
  • Macro Concepts
  • Decision-making
  • Fiscal Responsibility
  • Standard of Living

Standards and Objectives

Standards: CE.PFL.1 – Analyze the concepts and factors that enable individuals to make informed financial decisions for effective resource planning. CE.PFL.2 – Understand how risk management strategies empower and protect consumers.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.PFL.1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6

slide23

Conceptual Lens: Choices

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

What is the role of the individual

in a free market

economy?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • Income and personal budgeting
  • Debt management
  • Saving and investing
  • Consumerism and government regulation

Guiding Questions

What factors influence personal wealth?

What is credit? How is it both beneficial andproblematic?

How do individuals manage personal wealthresponsibly?

How do financial institutions (banks, credit unions,savings &loans, investment companies) help individuals accumulate and build wealth?

How does the stock market work?

What is consumerism and how does the governmentprotect consumers?

slide24

Conceptual Lens: Choices

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

In a market economy, individuals make decisions that affect their economic well-being.

All economic decisions are trade-offs.

Personal wealth is a combination of personal traits, opportunities, and intangible variables.

Personal wealth tends to rise when managed responsibly.

All individuals are consumers.

One role of government is to protect consumers from fraudulent or predatory business practices.

slide25

Unit Planner

Conceptual Lens: Interdependence

Unit 8: Global Trade

  • Micro Concepts
  • Comparative Advantage
  • Scarcity
  • Specialization
  • Protectionism
  • Macro Concepts
  • Trade
  • Interdependence
  • Globalization

Standards and Objectives

Standard: CE.E.2 - Understand factors of economic interdependence and their impact on nations.

Clarifying Objectives: CE.E.2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4

slide26

Conceptual Lens: Interdependence

Unit Planner

Critical Question:

Why do nations trade?

  • Instructional Sequence
  • Global Wealth and Poverty
  • Interdependence and Trade
  • Globalization
  • Foreign Policy and Trade

Guiding Questions

Why are some nations rich and others poor?

What is trade?

How does trade affect participants?

What is globalization and how is it affecting living standards around the world?

How can government policies both hinder and foster trade?

slide27

Conceptual Lens: Interdependence

Unit Planner

Enduring Understandings

Nations trade to offset scarcity.

Nations trade for comparative advantage.

Trade can encourage specialization and efficiency. Trade can also result in exploitation.

The prosperity and stability of advanced economies (such as the United States) are linked to the prosperity and stability of other nations.

A nation’s foreign policy is influenced by trade.

Public opinion is divided about the benefits of globalization.