slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Where Caesar’s Latin does not belong: a comparative grammar based approach to Romance etymology

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Where Caesar’s Latin does not belong: a comparative grammar based approach to Romance etymology - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 147 Views
  • Uploaded on

Where Caesar’s Latin does not belong: a comparative grammar based approach to Romance etymology. Eva Buchi ATILF (CNRS & Nancy-Université) ICHLL5 (St Anne’s College, Oxford, 16-18 June 2010). Proto-Romance. Portuguese. Sardinian. Romanian. Comparative grammar =

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Where Caesar’s Latin does not belong: a comparative grammar based approach to Romance etymology' - boyd


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Where Caesar’s Latin does not belong: a comparative grammar based approach to Romance etymology

Eva Buchi

ATILF (CNRS &

Nancy-Université)

ICHLL5 (St Anne’s College, Oxford, 16-18 June 2010)

Proto-Romance

Portuguese

Sardinian

Romanian

this talk advocates a paradigm shift in romance inherited etymology

Comparative grammar =

leading paradigm (bottom-up)

Except Romance languages: Latin (top-down)

(cabăllus, dĕcĕm, hĕrba ↔ *abbĭbĕrare)

Chambon 2007;

to appear

Recommends recreating Romance etymology on the basis of comparative grammar

This talk advocates a paradigm shiftin Romance inherited etymology
slide3

reconstructed

Cognates: Old Frisian, Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German

Etymon: Common German (Proto-German)

Etymology of engl. (to) fall?

The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology (1966):

semantic equivalents in romance etymology

Wilhelm Meyer-Lübke (1861–1936)

Semantic equivalents in Romance etymology?

Italian cadere, French choir, Spanish caer ‘to fall’

Romanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (REW3 1935)

in romance etymology the comparative method is bypassed by mentions of latin etyma
In Romance etymology, the comparative method is bypassed by mentions of Latin etyma

not attested

REW3:

Headword → classical Latin

Subentry → ‘fiddled with’ classical Latin

The headword does not account for Italian cadere

nor for any of its cognates!

5

comparative grammar
Comparative grammar?

Chambon 2007;

to appear

My claim: applying the comparative method to this etymological family deepens our understanding of its origin

Demonstration limited to the stressed syllable

6

slide7

Proto-Romance */'kad-e-/

*/'kad-e-re/

*/ka'd-e-re/

extensive

type

younger

stratum

recessive

type

older

stratum

2 inflectional types, 1 verb

this stratigraphy is confirmed by historical data

100 B.C.

This stratigraphy is confirmed by historical data

• */'kad-e-re/

A.D.

•*/ka'd-e-re/

300 B.C.

200 B.C.

Raupach in Lexikon der Romanistischen Linguistik

let s draw in latin philology
Let’s draw in Latin philology!

Lat. cadere (since Ennius [3rd/2nd century B.C.])

Lat. cadēre (late antiquity [4th century A.D.])

Hypothesis: */'kad-e-re/ and */ka'd-e-re/ = variants within the Latin diasystem (acrolect/basilect)

Earlier periods: spoken Latin contained both variants

Later on: it contained only */ka'd-e-re/

9

so was chambon right in his pleading
So was Chambon right in his pleading?

Yes, the comparative method yields more interesting results than the ‘look it up in the Latin dictionary’ approach

1. Romance etymology:

1 lexeme, 2 inflectional types, 2 diastratic varieties of Proto-Romance, internal stratification

Philip Durkin, The Oxford Guide to Etymology (2009: 10-11):

‘Even though our surviving records for classical Latin are mostly literary and reflect a highly homogeneous literary language, there is indeed some variation in our surviving Latin evidence, and the later evidence of the Romance languages suggests the existence of a good deal of further variation in Latin which is not reflected in the surviving documentary evidence.’

but there is more
But there is more…

2. Latin etymology:

deeper understanding of known data by placing them in the context of the diasystem of global Latin

3. Indo-European etymology:

Proto-Romance data compare, more easily than Latin data do, to Proto-x data

Proto-Indo-European

Proto-Germanic

Proto-Slavic

Proto-Romance

Latin

comparative grammar is a valuable method to be applied in romance inherited etymology
Comparative grammar is a valuable method to be applied in Romance inherited etymology

You may be tempted to challenge this generalization

DÉRom (Dictionnaire Étymologique Roman)

Edited by Wolfgang Schweickard and Eva Buchi

Compiled by a team of 34 linguists based in 7 countries (Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Romania, Spain)

First stage (2008–2010) funded by the ANR (Agence Nationale de la Recherche) and the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft)

goal of the d rom project reconstructing the core lexicon of proto romance about 500 etyma
Goal of the DÉRom project: reconstructing the core lexicon of Proto-Romance (about 500 etyma)

Free Web site: http://www.atilf.fr/DERom

13

slide15
In conclusion, I hope you agree that applying Chambon’s methodological plea to Italian cadere and its cognates bore fruit

→ */'kad-e-/ example provided the opportunity for presenting the DÉRom project

→ occasion for self-explanation

Anatoly Liberman (2009: 96):

‘In conformity with their genre, etymological dictionaries emphasize the results rather than the process of the investigation.’

one might think that there are no major discoveries left to be made in romance etymology
One might think that there are no major discoveries left to be made in Romance etymology

Georgia Green & Jerry Morgan, Practical guide to syntactic analysis (1996: 17):

‘Beginning students are sometimes discouraged by the belief that ‘all the easy stuff’s already been done. What’s left is really hard.’ But when that ‘easy stuff’ is examined closely, it often turns out that it is only half-done, and that the conclusions do not follow from the premises (which often are not made explicit), or that the assumptions they are based on are no longer considered tenable. A surprising amout of the ‘easy stuff’ needs to be re-done.’

Because of its Latin-orientedness, Romance inherited etymology is only half-done

therefore romance etymology needs a change of paradigm
Therefore Romance etymology needs a change of paradigm

Using from now on the technique of comparative reconstruction, Romance etymology shall be better integrated in general etymology

As to the course correction within Romance etymology, it will have to be carried out with tact…