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COACHING PowerPoint Presentation

COACHING

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COACHING

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  1. COACHING Wayne Hickman, Ed.D.; Christina Jordan, M.Ed.; & Rebecca Piermattei, M.S. School Climate Specialists Sheppard Pratt Health System

  2. My Job Today: To review various coaching styles • Influencer • Practical & Effective Coaching • Effective Coaching • Ineffective Coaching

  3. Copers vs. Influencers “People tend to be better copers than influencers. In fact, we’re wonderful at inventing ways to cope.” • Patterson, Grenny, et. al.

  4. Changing Minds People will attempt to change their behavior if: 1. they believe it will be worth it, and 2. they can do what is required.

  5. VERBAL PERSUASION • Most common tool to change others expectations • When it comes to resistant problems, it rarely works • The Great Persuader • Personal experience • Create a vicarious experiences • Become a good story teller • Tell the whole story • Provide hope

  6. VERBAL PERSUASION • Most common tool to change others expectations • When it comes to resistant problems, it rarely works • The Great Persuader • Personal experience • Create a vicarious experiences • Become a good story teller • Tell the whole story • Provide hope

  7. SIX SOURCES OF INFLUENCE

  8. PERSONAL MOTIVATION

  9. PERSONAL MOTIVATION Make the Undesirable Desirable • How can you get people to do things they currently find loathsome, boring, insulting, or painful? • The most basic source of motivation – intrinsic satisfaction.

  10. PERSONAL MOTIVATION • Create New Experiences • Get people to try it. • Make it a game. • Create New Motive • Connect to a person’s sense of self (pride). • Engage in moral thinking (what is best for you). • Don’t minimize or justify inappropriate behavior by transforming humans into statistics.

  11. PERSONAL MOTIVATION • Win Hearts by Honoring Choice • Surrender control, connect to the power of a committed heart. • Link into people’s view of who they want to be. • Allow individuals to discover on their own the links between their current behavior and what they really want.

  12. PERSONAL MOTIVATION Key Strategy: • Consciously connect to values • Allow self-discovery • Create personal experience • Create vicarious experiences • Tell a story • End with an invitation

  13. PERSONAL ABILITY

  14. PERSONAL ABILITY Surpass Your Limits • We often underestimate the need to learn and actually practice the behavior. • Perfect practice makes perfect. • Deliberate practice requires complete attention. • Give clear and frequent feedback against a known standard.

  15. PERSONAL ABILITY Surpass Your Limits • Break mastery into mini goals. • Set specific goals. • Goals to improve behaviors or processes rather than outcomes. • Provide short-term, specific, easy and low-stakes goals that specify the exact steps a person should take.

  16. PERSONAL ABILITY Key Strategy: • Demand deliberate practice • Practice • Break the skill into small parts • Get feedback from a coach • Prepare for setbacks

  17. SOCIAL MOTIVATION

  18. SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure The Power • Ensure that people feel praised. • Emotionally supported. • Encouraged by those around them. • Discourage or socially sanction unhealthy behaviors.

  19. SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure The Power of the Right One • Spend lots of time with formal leaders to ensure they are using their social influence. Enlist Opinion Leaders • Are early adopters of innovation. • Open to new ideas. • Socially connected and respected.

  20. SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure Become an Opinion Leader • Viewed as knowledgeable about the issues. • Viewed as trustworthy and have other people’s best interest in mind. • Generous with their time.

  21. SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure The Power of Everyone – Public Discoveries • Make the un-discussable discussable – code of silence sustains unhealthy behavior. • Must have open dialogue about proposed changes before it can be safely embraced by everyone.

  22. SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure Create a Village • Create space where formal and informal leaders relentlessly encourage appropriate, positive behaviors and skillfully confront negative behaviors.

  23. SOCIAL MOTIVATION Key Strategies: • Pave the way • Enlist the power of those who motivate • Seek the support of those who enable

  24. SOCIAL ABILITY

  25. SOCIAL ABILITY Find Strength in Numbers Enlist the Power of Social Capital • The profound enabling power of an essential network of relationships. • People at all intellectual levels – often perform better than one individual. • When facing change, turbulent or novel times – multiple heads can be better than one.

  26. SOCIAL ABILITY Key Strategies: • Pave the way • Enlist the power of those who motivate • Seek the support of those who enable

  27. STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION

  28. STRUCTUAL MOTIVATION Design Rewards & Demand Accountability Extrinsic Rewards • First 3 steps • Vital behaviors connect to intrinsic satisfaction. • Line up social support. • Rewards are the last resort.

  29. STRUCTUAL MOTIVATION Design Rewards & Demand Accountability Use Incentives Wisely • Ensure extrinsic rewards linked to vital behaviors are: • Immediate. • Gratifying. • Clearly correlated. • Small heartfelt tokens of appreciation. • Less is more.

  30. STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION Design Rewards & Demand Accountability • Reward small improvements in behavior along the way. • Reward vital behaviors alone – not outcomes. • If you reward the actual steps people follow, results take care of themselves.

  31. STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION Key Strategies: • Link rewards in moderation • Link rewards to vital behaviors • Use rewards that reward

  32. STRUCTURAL ABILITY

  33. STRUCTURAL ABILITY Change the Environment Consider: • The world of buildings, space, sound, sight. • Turn laser like attention off people and take a closer look at their physical world. • Frequency and quality of human interaction is largely a function of physical distance. • Propinquity – is physical proximity.

  34. STRUCTURAL ABILITY Change the Environment • Savvy leaders rely on use of physical space as means of enhancing interaction – don’t just tell people to collaborate, they move employees next to one another. • Making use of things to enable behavior works best when you can alter the physical world in a way that eliminates human choice.

  35. STRUCTURAL ABILITY Change the Environment Mind the Data Stream • Importance of an accurate data stream. • Strategies focus on vital behaviors by serving up visible, timely, and accurate information that supports their goals.

  36. STRUCTURAL ABILITY Key Strategies: • Use the power of space • Use the power of data and cues • Use the power of tools

  37. SIX SOURCES OF INFLUENCE“LOSING WEIGHT”

  38. PRACTICAL & EFFECTIVE COACHING • Administration • Communication • Data • Evidence-Based Programs • Stakeholders • Implementation • Team & Team Meeting • Other qualities & considerations

  39. ADMINISTRATION • Support • Not just buy-in • Supporting team decisions (trust) • Visible • Involved

  40. COMMUNICATION • Open • Clear expectations • Clear limitations • Any possible funding issues • Frequent • Always available even for quick text • Honest • Don’t personalize feedback and any frustration

  41. COMMUNICATION • Knowledgeable • Implementation of PBIS • Fidelity instruments • Visible Support • Liaison • Between grant, district, administration

  42. DATA • Importance of data • Assist in organizing/presenting data • For team • For staff • To monitor progress of efforts • Sources of data • Office referrals  Attendance • Out-of-school suspensions  Tardies • Positive Referrals  Academics

  43. EVIDENCE-BASED PROGRAMS • Let school(s) work within their own timeline • Okay to start small and work the kinks out • Utilize data to make decisions • Celebrate even the smallest successes • Work with what’s already in place

  44. STAKEHOLDERS • Encourage that team is representative of school staff • Know who has the power in the school and work through them • Encourage school to gather student/staff feedback • For sustainability, business/community support is imperative • Expect changes in team composition over time • Assist in educating new team members about team, purpose, etc.

  45. IMPLEMENTATION • If at multiple schools, each school may be in a different place of implementation • Let school(s) work within their own timeline • Be aware that team members may have their own agenda and perspective about school needs

  46. TEAM & TEAM MEETING • Group dynamics • Assist administration in devising an effective team • Recruiting team members • External coach? • Get to know team members • Individual personalities as well as how those personalities interact with and as the group • See team as expert of school’s culture, needs, desires • Broker – resource and information; build up team

  47. TEAM & TEAM MEETING • Willingness to help • Communicated • Honor culture of school • Come in with open mind • Present options • Allow the school to move it forward at their pace

  48. TEAM & TEAM MEETING • Team roles • Note taker • Minutes (Documentation) • Help set agenda standards • Action Plan Lessons • Data for each goal Budget/Incentives

  49. OTHER QUALITIES & CONSIDERATIONS • Motivated • Approach job positively • Demonstrate willingness to work with team • Prioritize work • Guide, facilitate NOT direct, dictate

  50. OTHER QUALITIES & CONSIDERATIONS • Support may look different from school-to-school • Expect successes & challenges • Pushback from schools is not personal • Be flexible