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Sonnet [ son -it]. By Jessica Bender Dictionary.com. Definition. A poem, properly expressive of a single, complete thought, idea, or sentiment of 14 lines, usually in an iambic pentameter, with rhymes arranges according to one of certain definite schemes. . Origin.

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Sonnet [ son -it]


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    1. Sonnet[son-it] By Jessica Bender Dictionary.com

    2. Definition • A poem, properly expressive of a single, complete thought, idea, or sentiment of 14 lines, usually in an iambic pentameter, with rhymes arranges according to one of certain definite schemes.

    3. Origin • Elizabeth Barrett Browning, John Keats, and William Shakespeare are poets known for their sonnets. • 1557 

    4. Synonyms & Antonyms

    5. Sonnet 18(Shakespeare) • Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate:Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines,By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;But thy eternal summer shall not fadeNor lose possession of that fair thou owest;Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,So long lives this and this gives life to thee.