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Expository and Persuasive Articles. Writing. Expository/Informational Writing. Expository/Informational. No bias Analyze each word for connotation ! Only include facts that can be documented 5-Paragraph Essay Intro, 3 Informational Paragraphs, Conclusion 3-5 Sentences per paragraph.

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expository informational
Expository/Informational
  • No bias
    • Analyze each word for connotation!
    • Only include facts that can be documented
  • 5-Paragraph Essay
    • Intro, 3 Informational Paragraphs, Conclusion
    • 3-5 Sentences per paragraph
what is expository informational writing
What is Expository (Informational) Writing?
  • Type of oral or written discourse that is used to explain, describe, give information or inform
  • Creator. . .can not assume that the reader or listener has prior knowledge or prior understanding of the topic that is being discussed.
  • . . .clarity requires strong organization. . .
    • http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html
types of expository writing
Types of Expository Writing:

Description

The author describes a topic by listing characteristics, features, and examples

Sequence

The author lists items or events in numerical or chronological order.

Comparison

The author explains how two or more things are alike and/or how they are different.

expository types
Expository types:

Cause and Effect

The author lists one or more causes and the resulting effect or effects.

Problem and Solution

The author states a problem and lists one or more solutions for the problem.

A variation of this pattern is the question- and-answer format in which the author poses a question and then answers it.

Examples:

http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html

  • http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html
informational expository
Informational-Expository
  • Why teach exposition?

“. . .expository writing and speech surround us in our everyday lives.”

http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html

slide8

“Let's think about the type of writing that most of us encounter in our daily lives. When you pick up and read a non-fiction book, magazines, or newspaper article the author uses expository writing to inform you, the reader, about the topic.”

http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html

slide9

“. . .At school, students are required to submit school exams and research papers as a means for their teachers to grade their progress.”

http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html

slide10

“. . .Finally, at work, people are required to produce business reports and memorandums to inform their superiors and co-workers about the occurrences that take place at other levels of the company.”

slide11

“. . .In addition, oral exposition is primarily observed in oral academic presentations, business talks, and speeches that are delivered to a group of people.”

http://www.stanford.edu/~arnetha/expowrite/info.html

remaining neutral in your writing
Remaining Neutral in your Writing
  • http://www.uiowa.edu/~writingc/writers/controversies/neutral.shtml(neutrality)
  • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/608/01/ (appropriate language)
bibliography
Bibliography
  • Use proper form
  • Purdue University
    • OWL: Online Writing Lab
    • MLA Formatting and Style Guide
    • KnightCite
      • http://www.calvin.edu/library/knightcite/
in text citations
In-text Citations
  • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/02/

Wordsworth stated that Romantic poetry was marked by a "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (263).

Romantic poetry is characterized by the "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (Wordsworth 263).

Wordsworth extensively explored the role of emotion in the creative process (263).

examples of student writing
Examples of Student Writing
  • http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/
prewriting
Prewriting:

Expository Paper

Date: October 30, 2012

To: World Literature Class

From: Mrs. Dibley

Subject: Today’s agenda

Here is the agenda for today’s class:

Gather materials

Circle titles of source documents

Box Bibliographical information (author, publisher, date, etc.)

Read/skim materials collected

Highlight all details of significance or interest in the articles

Please raise your hand and show me your prewriting progress by the end of the class period. Thanks!

10 minute prewriting
10 Minute Prewriting:

Option A:

write anything about topic you know/have learned (brainstorming)

Option B:

list everything you want to say about the topic (can be used later as an outline) --no worries about grammatical errors at this point --easiest to grasp ideas in threes (5 paragraph essay) --can be slightly longer --intro is often written last

For Tuesday: First draft written and ready for peer editing!

monday november 5
Monday, November 5
  • In-class writing (1st draft due tomorrow!)
  • Use brainstorming activity from Wednesday
  • Use highlighted information
  • Get ideas on paper!
  • Once information is written
    • Check organization—3+ paragraphs
    • Logical order of paragraphs
    • Introduction with thesis (strong unifying sentence tying in information to follow)
    • Conclusion that wraps up, restates, and leaves you with something new to think about
persuasive
Persuasive
  • Bias is encouraged!
    • Carefully choose words to convince others to agree with you
  • 3 Paragraphs
    • 3-5 Sentences per paragraph
persuasive writing1
Persuasive Writing
  • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/696/1 (presentation)
  • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/624/1/ (rhetoric in workplace writing)
  • http://myweb.uiowa.edu/egand/writing_RA.html (how-to/student issues)
celebrity voices
Celebrity Voices:
  • http://abcnews.go.com/ThisWeek/video?id=1906914
  • http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/georgeclooneyunitednations.htm
  • http://notonourwatchproject.org/
don t go here
“Don’t Go Here!”
  • http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/ineffective.html

What NOT to say in peer revision. . .

slide25

I thought your writing was interesting.

  • This writer is using a very popular word in peer review, but "interesting" doesn't really say much. The author in this case would not know what the reader found interesting or why it was interesting. Try to be specific in your comments.
slide26

Your essay is OK, but mine is better.This person is making the review process competitive, and acting as an opponent, rather than a helper.

slide27

I loved your story. By the way, you have beautiful eyes. Are you free for lunch?This critic is more interested in the writer than in the work.

slide28

I hated your poem, and you are a bad person.Here, the reviewer is being very harsh, speaking personally, and not offering any comments that will lead to productive changes.