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The Mindful Supervisor: Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision

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  1. The Mindful Supervisor:Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision A Production of the Great Western Regional Field Coordinators – 2005-2007 Dr. John Eggers – Correctional Program Specialist, NIC

  2. The Mindful Supervisor:Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision Great Western Regional Field Coordinators: • Dave Dusschee – Oregon • Tim Foss – Washington • Carrie Hodap – Arizona • Karen Holland – Wyoming • Steven King – Utah • Amy Le – California • Gregory Morton – Oregon • Aaron Shepard – Idaho • Toni Spencer – California • Wayne Ternes – Montana

  3. The Mindful Supervisor:Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision With course design assistance provided by: • Gary Lasater, Oregon Youth Authority • Patrick Samples, Oregon Department of Corrections • John Tyler, Oregon Department of Corrections

  4. MINDFULNESS – A technique in which a person becomes purposefully aware of his/her thoughts, feelings and decisions in the present moment, non-judgmentally. It serves as a pre-requisite to developing insight and wisdom.

  5. MINDFULNESS – • Overlapping concepts: • Emotional Intelligence • Self Awareness • Authentic Leadership • Metacognition

  6. LEADERSHIP AND SELF AWARENESS • “21st century leadership calls for a new type of leader who understands him/herself well and can call others into a higher state of being, rather than the old style leader who simply knows how to manage [business] processes.” • Connelly and Diaz; Executive Awareness, 2007

  7. LEADERSHIP AND SELF AWARENESS • “A fundamental starting point for leadership development is self awareness . . . Self-knowledge continues to serve our growth and development throughout life . . . who you are and what you believe is possible.” • Avolio and Luthans; The High Impact Leader, 2006

  8. “Releasing ourselves from the need to keep half of ourselves hidden…, to entertain the possibility that there is an integral wholeness to all the seemingly antagonistic and opposing sides of ourselves, a possibility that we may not have to be ‘fixed’ or amended before we can serve ourselves or the company.” • David Whyte; The Heart Aroused, 1996

  9. “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates, 399 BC

  10. “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates, 399 BC

  11. Course Outline: • Qualities and Skill Building for Supervisors Personal Position Statement; Cognitive/Behavioral Model 2. Values Dissonance: Personal Vision & Organizational Context 3. Effective Communication 4. Making Decisions and Creating Solutions 5. Valuing Differences 6. Encouraging Performance 7. Team Building 8. Supervisory Development Plan

  12. The Mindful Supervisor:Cognitive Principles in Staff Supervision Qualities and Skill Building for Supervisors

  13. Performance Objectives: • Discuss at least one professional mentor and model in your life. • Explain the concept of automatic thoughts and feelings. • Examine the three internal dimensions of the Cognitive/Behavioral model. • Review the two external dimensions of the Cognitive/Behavioral model. • Utilize the Supervisory Self-Awareness (SSA) Model

  14. Questions • What is an effective supervisor? • What does being a supervisor mean to you? • What are the skill sets needed by a supervisor? • What emotions contribute to effectiveness?

  15. Mentors and Models • Individually write the names of several people who you have learned from. • List the memorable and effective characteristics and attributes that you adapted from each one.

  16. Mentors and Models Now list the negative attributes and characteristics that each had. • Which would you keep? • Which would you drop? • Which would you add?

  17. 1. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS • What’s missing in the picture of this tree?

  18. 1. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS • The roots!!!

  19. 1. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS • What are our roots like?

  20. * Skill * Stated Knowledge BEHAVIOR THOUGHTS FEELINGS * More likely aware COGNITIVE STRUCTURE (thinking patterns) BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES * Under the surface Source: Mark Carey, The Carey Group

  21. Personal Position Statement • “What’s your frequency?”

  22. QUALITIES AND SKILL BUILDING FOR SUPERVISORS • Cognitive/Behavioral Model

  23. Cognitive/Behavioral Model Consequences Situation Behavior Thoughts Feelings

  24. Cognitive/Behavioral Model Two External Dimensions • Situations, Consequences Three Internal Dimensions • Thoughts, Feelings, Behavior

  25. Risky thoughts and feelings contribute to either ineffective relationship or productivity outcomes. Pro-social thoughts and feelings contribute to effective relationship or productivity outcomes.

  26. Cognitive/Behavioral Model Consequences Situation Behavior Thoughts Feelings

  27. Cognitive/Behavioral Model Consequences Situation Behavior Thoughts Feelings

  28. SUPERVISORY SELF AWARENESS NOTES

  29. Identify several situations • List your real, automatic thoughts, feelings and actions • Stop there

  30. Qualities and Skill Building for Supervisors Review: • Mentors and Roots • Personal Position Statement • Cognitive Behavioral Model • Supervisory Self Awareness Notes

  31. Values Dissonance: Personal Vision and Organizational Context

  32. Performance Objectives: • Utilize the Supervisory Self-Awareness (SSA) Model to analyze congruence between your Personal Position Statement and your agency Mission • Utilize the SSA Model to analyze discrepancies between your Personal Position Statement and an agency policy or practice

  33. Where there is no vision, the people perish.

  34. Individual Activity - Mission Statement • Identify your agency’s mission statement. Don’t interpret it according to your own preferences. • Retrieve your personal position statement. • Using an SSA worksheet, compare the two. • Is there any dissonance ?

  35. Individual Activity -Personal Values vs. Agency Values Conflict • Choose a situation where you are in conflict with the expectations of your agency • Fill out Automatic Thoughts and Feelings, Preferred Outcomes and Mindful Thoughts and Feelings • Don’t fill out the Action section

  36. Personal Values vs. Agency Values Conflict • Did you have automatic thoughts or feelings? Were they risky? • How did you express those automatic thoughts or feelings? • What were your behaviors? • What were the positive and negative consequences of those behaviors?

  37. Personal Vision and Organizational Context • Do your personal beliefs impact your organizational expectations? • Do your personal beliefs impact your expectations as a supervisor?

  38. The Mindful Supervisor 360˚ Supervisor Skills Assessment Instrument

  39. 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK, aka Using Your Mirrors “There is a way to do it better . . . find it.” • Thomas A. Edison, describing his research strategy

  40. Three Reasons We Reject Feedback Given By Others • Unwillingness to Challenge Self-perceptions • Fear of Exposing Weaknesses • Fear of Unbalanced Feedback • Lepsinger, Lucia; The Art and Science of 360 Feedback 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK

  41. 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK • Unwillingness to Challenge Self-perceptions • Comfort zones are comfortable • Why mess with a good thing? • A strong belief in oneself and one’s ability are important factors in management confidence

  42. 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK • Fear of Exposing Weaknesses • And a voluntary 360 is like asking for our weaknesses to be exposed – publicly • Can set up defensiveness and denial • Are you calling me fat?

  43. 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK • Fear of Unbalanced Feedback • People will only see the negatives • The good things I do will be overlooked and ignored • Nobody’s perfect, but I’m not a total idiot

  44. MINDFULNESS – A technique in which a person becomes purposefully aware of his/her thoughts, feelings and decisions in the present moment, non-judgmentally. It serves as a pre-requisite to developing insight and wisdom.

  45. Supervisory Self Awareness Notes

  46. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Change your thinking and you change your world.

  47. Performance Objectives: • Discuss the value of Stephen Covey’s Habit #5. • Identify the three components of verbal communication and the percentage of information found in each. • Explain the relationship of Self Talk to the Communications model and to the Cognitive/Behavioral Model.

  48. Performance Objectives: • Describe the Arc of Distortion. • Utilize the Left-Hand Column Model to analyze thoughts and feelings.

  49. Habit #5 “Seek first to understand and then to be understood.” • Stephen R. Covey, • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, 1990.

  50. Communication Assessment Courageous Communication. Win-win; we constantly learn from and grow with each other. Problems occur; we work to fix them. Repeat as necessary. Pretty much on the same page. Agree to Disagree, then step away. I’d do more if you would. Adversarial; I win, you lose. It’s mostly your fault. Contentious. Sabotage Communication. Enemies, enemies; everywhere you look.