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Purpose and implications for target audience

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  1. National Vulnerability and Risk Assessments Questions for Consideration (1)Tuesday, 24th June 20148th EIONET Workshop on Climate Change Impacts,Vulnerability and Adaptation Purpose and implications for target audience • What is the purpose and the main target audience for your assessment, and how were these defined? • Spain: the 2008 NAP and mainstreaming of CCA is the main driver. The national assessment includes CC impacts and vulnerability indicators for a wide range of sectors (e.g. water, biodiversity, coasts, soil, human health, tourism, transport), using climate change scenarios from the metoffice. Coordination is done with the regions and through research institutes. It takes about 5 years to complete a full assessment cycle. • UK: the main purpose is to inform the NAP and the parliament. There is a legally agreed 5 year cycle for the national CC risk assessment; the first report was published in 2012, the second is planned for 2017. The assessment is mainly driven by new climate science and key changes in exposure. For 2017 there is a focus on filling gaps and on cross-sectoral risks. The 2017 assessment will also assess as a new issue CC impacts occurring outside UK with an effect on the UK. The long time period between availability of new climate scenarios and use of these in impact/risk assessments is a problem. • IT: the national impact/vulnerability assessment was broad covering many sectors and issues. It was finalised in 2014 and is the basis for the first NAS being prepared/finalised in 2014. • NO: the assessment was also linked to the NAS. An update is underway taking into account the latest IPCC AR5 results and the focus is on significant new scientific knowledge. • ISDR: A 4-5 year cycle for assessments is sensible taking while into account that exposure is likely changing more than the climate in such a period.

  2. National Vulnerability and Risk Assessments Questions for Consideration (2)Tuesday, 24th June 20148th EIONET Workshop on Climate Change Impacts,Vulnerability and Adaptation Scope of the assessment • What aspects are being explicitly included and not included in the scope and why? • Spain: socio-economic systems are also addressed, e.g. coastal (econ development) • UK: the aim is to include more socio-economic data and in particular there is a need for better data at urban level. • ISDR: the biggest issue is to assess urban ‘capital stock’ (infrastructure etc)

  3. National Vulnerability and Risk Assessments Questions for Consideration (3)Tuesday, 24th June 20148th EIONET Workshop on Climate Change Impacts,Vulnerability and Adaptation Methods and approaches used • What are the main methods and approaches that will be used? • UK: the 2012 CC risk assessment (CCRA) was prepared by authors from range of institutes (funded by government) and it included a summary for policymakers. The Adaptation Subcommittee (ASC) will in 2015 prepare a report on adaptation indicators to the government, which will be one inputs to the 2017 CCRA, amongst other inputs. • To what extent are stakeholders/end-users to be engaged (and how)? • IT: the assessment was mainly science driven, based on review of available knowledge. It included one round of consultation, with some feedback from stakeholders. • ES: workshops were held with sectors and increasingly also with the private sector. • UK: the CCRA2012 was launched by the environment minister, followed by a series of stakeholder workshops; the aim is to involve businesses more for the 2017 assessment. • What is the nature of the climate information available for the assessment (degree of detail and the use of a range of scenarios/projections)? • Not discussed

  4. National Vulnerability and Risk Assessments Questions for Consideration (4)Tuesday, 24th June 20148th EIONET Workshop on Climate Change Impacts,Vulnerability and Adaptation Outputs and delivery mechanisms • What do you see as the main output and the scope of the outputs that should be made available (e.g. paper report, web-based, summary)? Various countries: both paper and web are used and important • To what extent is there a need and the possibility for engagement with the target audience in identifying the outputs and their delivery? Not discussed Delivery and scope of the assessment • What is the size of the resources (persons, budget) that can be allocated to the assessment? Not discussed

  5. National Vulnerability and Risk Assessments Questions for Consideration (5)Tuesday, 24th June 20148th EIONET Workshop on Climate Change Impacts,Vulnerability and Adaptation Measuring success • To what extent and purpose is monitoring and analysis on the use and ‘success’ of the assessment part of your assessment process? UK: it is not easy to assess use and success of the assessment Using lessons learnt and experiences • Is there a process in place for learning from the assessment (identifying ‘lessons learnt’) and how will the experiences and lessons learnt be used to inform subsequent assessments? UK: after the 2012 CCRA, three separate evaluations were done (by a contractor, ASC, and the department for environment DEFRA); this was very helpful to scope the second CCRA due in 2017.