Chapter 5 6 analysis
Download
1 / 11

- PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 100 Views
  • Updated On :

Chapter 5 & 6 Analysis. Please take notes. Chapter 5: Ominous Scene. All sense of optimism for the farm or the freedom the men would have on it dissolves now that Lennie’s unwittingly dangerous nature has reasserted itself.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '' - bergen


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Chapter 5 6 analysis l.jpg

Chapter 5 & 6 Analysis

Please take notes


Chapter 5 ominous scene l.jpg
Chapter 5: Ominous Scene

All sense of optimism for the farm or the freedom the men would have on it dissolves now that Lennie’s unwittingly dangerous nature has reasserted itself.

When Curley’s wife appears and insists on talking with Lennie, the reader senses that something tragic is about to ensue.


Curley s wife l.jpg
Curley’s Wife

Most significant development-Curley’s wife

Flirt, temptress, manipulator

Final moments before her death-Steinbeck presents her sympathetically

Her loneliness becomes the focus of the scene

She admits that she too has an idea of paradise that circumstances have denied her

Her dream of being a movie star is similar to the dream of the farm

Both are desperate held views of the way life should be-they have persisted despite their conflict with reality


Loneliness l.jpg
Loneliness

Curley’s wife seems to sense that because Lennie doesn’t understand much, she can say anything to him.

Confesses her unhappy marriage, lonely life, broken dreams

Fails to see the danger in Lennie and attempts to console him for the loss of his puppy by letting him stroke her hair-leads her tragic death


Slide5 l.jpg

Once all the marks of an unhappy life have left her face, she is pretty, simple, sweet, young-brought back to innocence.

It seems that the only way to restore innocence is through death.

Lennie’s flight from the barn shifts to focus to George.


The decision l.jpg
The Decision she is pretty, simple, sweet, young-brought back to innocence.

The painful mission that must be done is clear to him

Slim-voice of reason pointing out that the best option is to kill Lennie.

George understands he had no other choice-either watch his friend be murdered by Curley’s lynch mob or do the deed himself, giving Lennie dignity.


Dream is dead l.jpg
Dream is Dead she is pretty, simple, sweet, young-brought back to innocence.

The Dream of the farm disappears.

Candy clings to this idealized hope, asking if they can still buy it.

His response is the most insightful and realistic in response to the novel-there is no room for dreaming in such a difficult and inhospitable world.


Chapter 6 back to eden l.jpg
Chapter 6: Back to Eden she is pretty, simple, sweet, young-brought back to innocence.

Once again, scene opens in the clearing in the woods, with the riverbed and its surroundings described as beautiful and idyllic. Many details are repeated from the book’s opening passages such as the quality of the sunset, the distant mountains, the water snakes. This time, the natural beauty is marred by the suffering of innocents.


Letting go of the dream l.jpg
Letting Go of The Dream she is pretty, simple, sweet, young-brought back to innocence.

Final Scene between George and Lennie is suffused with sadness, even though Lennie retains his blissful ignorance until the end.

To reassure Lennie, George reassures him with the Dream one last time.

For George, this final description of life with Lennie and the farm is a surrender of his dreams.

The vision of the farm recedes and George realizes that all his work has amounted to nothing.


Slide10 l.jpg

George realizes he is exactly the man he tried to convince himself he was not-just another migrant worker who is not able to afford anything.

Without Lennie, George relinquishes his hope for a different life.

Lennie was the only thing that distinguished his life from the lives of the other men and gave him a special sense of purpose-w/o Lennie these hopes die.

Grim note on which the novel closes is that dreams have no place in a world filled with such injustice and adversity.


Slide11 l.jpg

Only Slim understands the profound loss and knows George needs consoling.

Carlson and Curley watch Slim lead George away and their puzzlement is rooted more in ignorance than heartlessness. Carlson and Curley represent the harsh conditions of a distinctly real world, a world in which the weak will always be vanquished by the strong and in which the rare delicate bond between friends is not appropriately mourned because it is not understood.


ad