IT DOES GET IN Targeting Maori students needs across the curriculum Mark Dashper Team Solutions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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    1. IT DOES GET IN !!! Targeting Maori students needs across the curriculum Mark Dashper (Team Solutions)

    3. Research underpinning practice Te Kotahitanga Developing a culturally responsive pedagogy of relations in mainstream school classrooms PD intervention Effective Teaching Profiles Anti-deficit thinking Teacher - student interactions Addressing student achievement Working towards sustainability Russell Bishop Foundation Professor and Assistant Dean for Maori Education in the School of Education at University of Waikato. Also an experienced secondary school teacher. Work on collaborative story-ing as Kaupapa Maori research led to writing the book, Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga, and publishing nationally and internationally on this topic. Currently the project director for a large Ministry of Education funded research and professional development project to improve educational achievement of Maori students in mainstream classrooms. Email: r.bishop@waikato.ac.nzRussell Bishop Foundation Professor and Assistant Dean for Maori Education in the School of Education at University of Waikato. Also an experienced secondary school teacher. Work on collaborative story-ing as Kaupapa Maori research led to writing the book, Collaborative Research Stories: Whakawhanaungatanga, and publishing nationally and internationally on this topic. Currently the project director for a large Ministry of Education funded research and professional development project to improve educational achievement of Maori students in mainstream classrooms. Email: r.bishop@waikato.ac.nz

    4. Research underpinning practice Te Mana Korero Te Mana 1 focus: What does successful teaching of Maori students look like? A strong belief in high expectations Maori students do and can achieve. You make the difference and these are some of the ways (using evidence-based pedagogy). Some of the key features of successful professional development are emphasising the importance of teachers and other schools staff: * engaging students meaningfully in the learning process and sharing the responsibility for setting learning goals; * forming positive and mutually respectful relationships with students; * undertaking focused and sustained professional development within a collaborative and reflective learning community; * making teaching and learning decisions based on data from a wide range of sources; * using student's prior knowledge and local community expertise within the delivery of the curriculum and the learning process; * developing close relationships with whanau to support learning; and * using ICT innovatively to promote learning. Underpinning the key features of successful professional development around quality teaching are important Maori concepts or principals. Attending to these principles is essential if Maori students are to feel truly valued and therefore meaningfully engaged in classroom learning activities. Some of these principles are: * Manaakingitanga the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else; * Mana motuhake the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students; * Whakawhanaungatanga the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning; and * Ako the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher. Some of the key features of successful professional development are emphasising the importance of teachers and other schools staff: * engaging students meaningfully in the learning process and sharing the responsibility for setting learning goals; * forming positive and mutually respectful relationships with students; * undertaking focused and sustained professional development within a collaborative and reflective learning community; * making teaching and learning decisions based on data from a wide range of sources; * using student's prior knowledge and local community expertise within the delivery of the curriculum and the learning process; * developing close relationships with whanau to support learning; and * using ICT innovatively to promote learning. Underpinning the key features of successful professional development around quality teaching are important Maori concepts or principals. Attending to these principles is essential if Maori students are to feel truly valued and therefore meaningfully engaged in classroom learning activities. Some of these principles are: * Manaakingitanga the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else; * Mana motuhake the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students; * Whakawhanaungatanga the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning; and * Ako the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher.

    5. Research underpinning practice Te Mana Korero Te Mana 2 focus: Teachers understand they are on a life long journey of PL; Teachers challenge deficit beliefs and assumptions so that the knowledge and experiences of Maori students and their whanau are acknowledged and built on; Teachers are exposed to different view points in the collection and analysis of Maori student data and this acts as a catalyst for action; Teachers are supported to improve the quality of their interactions with Maori students and their whanau that will support the learning of Maori students; Teachers engage in PD that strengthens their pedagogical knowledge, attitudes, and practice; and Teachers believe that quality teaching of Maori students will benefit all students. Some of the key features of successful professional development are emphasising the importance of teachers and other schools staff: * engaging students meaningfully in the learning process and sharing the responsibility for setting learning goals; * forming positive and mutually respectful relationships with students; * undertaking focused and sustained professional development within a collaborative and reflective learning community; * making teaching and learning decisions based on data from a wide range of sources; * using student's prior knowledge and local community expertise within the delivery of the curriculum and the learning process; * developing close relationships with whanau to support learning; and * using ICT innovatively to promote learning. Underpinning the key features of successful professional development around quality teaching are important Maori concepts or principals. Attending to these principles is essential if Maori students are to feel truly valued and therefore meaningfully engaged in classroom learning activities. Some of these principles are: * Manaakingitanga the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else; * Mana motuhake the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students; * Whakawhanaungatanga the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning; and * Ako the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher. Some of the key features of successful professional development are emphasising the importance of teachers and other schools staff: * engaging students meaningfully in the learning process and sharing the responsibility for setting learning goals; * forming positive and mutually respectful relationships with students; * undertaking focused and sustained professional development within a collaborative and reflective learning community; * making teaching and learning decisions based on data from a wide range of sources; * using student's prior knowledge and local community expertise within the delivery of the curriculum and the learning process; * developing close relationships with whanau to support learning; and * using ICT innovatively to promote learning. Underpinning the key features of successful professional development around quality teaching are important Maori concepts or principals. Attending to these principles is essential if Maori students are to feel truly valued and therefore meaningfully engaged in classroom learning activities. Some of these principles are: * Manaakingitanga the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else; * Mana motuhake the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students; * Whakawhanaungatanga the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning; and * Ako the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher.

    6. Research underpinning practice Te Mana Korero Te Mana 3 focus: Relationships for learning Te Mana 3 clip (Tolaga Bay Area School) Some of the key features of successful professional development are emphasising the importance of teachers and other schools staff: * engaging students meaningfully in the learning process and sharing the responsibility for setting learning goals; * forming positive and mutually respectful relationships with students; * undertaking focused and sustained professional development within a collaborative and reflective learning community; * making teaching and learning decisions based on data from a wide range of sources; * using student's prior knowledge and local community expertise within the delivery of the curriculum and the learning process; * developing close relationships with whanau to support learning; and * using ICT innovatively to promote learning. Underpinning the key features of successful professional development around quality teaching are important Maori concepts or principals. Attending to these principles is essential if Maori students are to feel truly valued and therefore meaningfully engaged in classroom learning activities. Some of these principles are: * Manaakingitanga the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else; * Mana motuhake the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students; * Whakawhanaungatanga the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning; and * Ako the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher. Some of the key features of successful professional development are emphasising the importance of teachers and other schools staff: * engaging students meaningfully in the learning process and sharing the responsibility for setting learning goals; * forming positive and mutually respectful relationships with students; * undertaking focused and sustained professional development within a collaborative and reflective learning community; * making teaching and learning decisions based on data from a wide range of sources; * using student's prior knowledge and local community expertise within the delivery of the curriculum and the learning process; * developing close relationships with whanau to support learning; and * using ICT innovatively to promote learning. Underpinning the key features of successful professional development around quality teaching are important Maori concepts or principals. Attending to these principles is essential if Maori students are to feel truly valued and therefore meaningfully engaged in classroom learning activities. Some of these principles are: * Manaakingitanga the care for students as culturally located human beings above all else; * Mana motuhake the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students; * Whakawhanaungatanga the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning; and * Ako the promotion of effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher.

    7. Research underpinning practice Best Evidence Synthesis Effective links are created between school and other cultural contexts in which students are socialised, to facilitate learning. Pedgogical practices enable classes and other learning groupings to work as caring, inclusive, and cohesive learning communities. Quality teaching is responsive to student learning processes. Curriculum goals, resources including ICT usage, task design, teaching and school practices are effectively aligned.

    8. Research underpinning practice Praising Maori Children In a culturally responsive, supportive environment, praise can have a powerful effect on Maori students learning and behaviour. Understanding and working with whakama for praise. An opportunity for a raru hui - collective forum to talk through issues and to decide on a consequence. Sharing of teachers personal experiences as a student. Invite kuia, kaumatua, and positive Maori role models to the school.

    9. Research underpinning practice Personal VS Impersonal Making connections with Maori learners Who are you? Where are you from? Are you really interested in me? Can I trust you? Do you really care? Should I follow you?

    10. Research underpinning practice Traditional Western approach to teaching What? Why? How? Who? (if indeed it is considered at all) [Give out handout: Maori Key Competencies and discuss as a group depending on time ][Give out handout: Maori Key Competencies and discuss as a group depending on time ]

    11. Importance of Cultural Contexts Teachers ensure that student experiences of instruction have known relationships to other cultural contexts in which the students have been/are socialised. (Alton-Lee. A, 2003, p. 32) Associative link-making to students prior experiences and knowledge is fundamental to the learning process and one of the recurrent and strongest findings in research on teaching. (Alton-Lee. A, 2003, p.38)

    12. Role of Paki Waitara The central role of the cultural dimensions of classroom practice that Alton-Lee identifies, is reinforced by the paki waitara method of delivery used in the course, which engages student participation through links with their own experiences, cultural practices, and cultural identity. Nash, (1993) refers to this as cultural capital the term contemporary sociology uses for the storehouse of experiences, knowledge, and attitudes a child can capitalise on when going to school. (McNaughton, 2002, p.21) McNaughton, S. (2002). Meeting of Minds. Wellington: Learning Media

    13. E-Learning E-learning is about the use of ICTs that support sound teaching and learning pedagogy, providing planned, purposeful and managed electronic experiences for the learner. (definition from Team Solutions e-learning Reference Group) E-learning is learning that is enabled or supported by the use of digital tools and content, which are typically accessed via the internet, or via multimedia formats such as CD-ROM. (Ministry of Educations Tertiary E-Learning Strategy 2004, p.1)

    14. What are Learning Objects? Learning objects (also known as digital objects, knowledge objects, educational objects, instructional objects, intelligent objects, reusable learning objects and data objects) are made up of small, independent chunks of digital information that can be reused in their original form or adapted to meet the needs of unique learners. Some of the benefits of using learning objects include: ? personalized learning ? increased selection of learning material ? reduced development time ? reuse of resources (University of Auckland, Faculty of Education) A learning object: ? is one or more files or 'chunks' of material, which might consist of graphics, text, audio, animation, calculator or interactive notebook, and is designed to be used as a stand-alone learning experience ? is reusable - a single learning object may be used in multiple contexts for multiple purposes such as across curriculum areas, year levels, different locales and cultures ? can be used as a component of a topic or unit of work alongside other digital and non-digital resources and tools ? is accessible from the World Wide Web and is referenced, located and accessed by its metadata descriptors ? can be identified, stored, and tracked using a Content or Learning Management System. (The Le@rning Federation)A learning object: ? is one or more files or 'chunks' of material, which might consist of graphics, text, audio, animation, calculator or interactive notebook, and is designed to be used as a stand-alone learning experience ? is reusable - a single learning object may be used in multiple contexts for multiple purposes such as across curriculum areas, year levels, different locales and cultures ? can be used as a component of a topic or unit of work alongside other digital and non-digital resources and tools ? is accessible from the World Wide Web and is referenced, located and accessed by its metadata descriptors ? can be identified, stored, and tracked using a Content or Learning Management System. (The Le@rning Federation)

    15. Integrated learning strategies that help promote engagement: Practical hands-on components involving making things, and incorporating values and the key competencies The presentation is structured around Matauranga Maori, Maori values, protocol, ritual, spiritualism, and symbolism Delivery involves the Maori narrative tradition of paki waitara embedded into the delivery.

    16. Integrated learning strategies that help promote engagement: Learning focus often leads from the Arts across all curriculum areas Maori teaching and learning pedagogies are embedded Constant and genuine use of praise Humour is naturally absorbed into everything ICT integrated into all teaching and learning.

    17. [Give out worksheet: CPaBL Maori Pedagogies to fill in as we go along or in groups if time allows] Manaakitanga: the caring ethic Rangatiratanga: self empowerment Whakawhanaungatanga: establishing relationships Kotahitanga: working towards a common goal Ako: to learn and teach - reciprocal learning Taonga Tuku Iho: the cultural directions[Give out worksheet: CPaBL Maori Pedagogies to fill in as we go along or in groups if time allows] Manaakitanga: the caring ethic Rangatiratanga: self empowerment Whakawhanaungatanga: establishing relationships Kotahitanga: working towards a common goal Ako: to learn and teach - reciprocal learning Taonga Tuku Iho: the cultural directions

    18. Manaakitanga should be integrated into all our programme delivery. We base this on the findings of Russell Bishop and Te Kotahitanga programme, and Te Mana Korero I and II (Teachers making a difference for Maori students) video programme.Manaakitanga should be integrated into all our programme delivery. We base this on the findings of Russell Bishop and Te Kotahitanga programme, and Te Mana Korero I and II (Teachers making a difference for Maori students) video programme.

    19. Rangatiratanga: self empowermentRangatiratanga: self empowerment

    20. Whakawhanaungatanga: establishing relationshipsWhakawhanaungatanga: establishing relationships

    21. Kotahitanga: working towards a common goalKotahitanga: working towards a common goal

    22. Ako: to learn and teach - reciprocal learningAko: to learn and teach - reciprocal learning

    23. Taonga Tuku Iho: the cultural directionsTaonga Tuku Iho: the cultural directions

    24. Mana Motuhake= developing identity and independance Wananga= traditional schools of learning Hui= ceremonial gatherings Tuakana/teina= older and younger sibling type teaching and learning relationship Paki Waitara = narrative pedagogies of communication of traditional knowledge Whanau= collectives of people working to a common end (Joan Metge defn) Kaupapa = collective vision or philosophy (Russell Bishop defn)Mana Motuhake= developing identity and independance Wananga= traditional schools of learning Hui= ceremonial gatherings Tuakana/teina= older and younger sibling type teaching and learning relationship Paki Waitara = narrative pedagogies of communication of traditional knowledge Whanau= collectives of people working to a common end (Joan Metge defn) Kaupapa = collective vision or philosophy (Russell Bishop defn)

    25. Mana Motuhake= developing identity and independance Mana Motuhake= developing identity and independance

    26. Wananga= traditional schools of learning Delivery by a specialist/skilled teacher to ensure qualitative differentiation rather than more of the same Hui= ceremonial gatherings Wananga= traditional schools of learning Delivery by a specialist/skilled teacher to ensure qualitative differentiation rather than more of the same Hui= ceremonial gatherings

    27. Tuakana/teina= older and younger sibling type teaching and learning relationship Tuakana/teina= older and younger sibling type teaching and learning relationship

    28. Paki Waitara = narrative pedagogies of communication of traditional knowledge Fits with the international paradigm shift from personality to identity. Also fits into the constructivist experience emphasising narrative reflection and dialogue to make meaning of history and story. Paki Waitara = narrative pedagogies of communication of traditional knowledge Fits with the international paradigm shift from personality to identity. Also fits into the constructivist experience emphasising narrative reflection and dialogue to make meaning of history and story.

    29. Whanau= collectives of people working to a common end (Joan Metge defn) Many schools now offer Whanau structures, and may even group students from the same families into a common school whanau. Sports use the whanau structure in schools as the traditional house organisation.Whanau= collectives of people working to a common end (Joan Metge defn) Many schools now offer Whanau structures, and may even group students from the same families into a common school whanau. Sports use the whanau structure in schools as the traditional house organisation.

    30. Kaupapa = collective vision or philosophy (Russell Bishop / Te Kotahitanga defn) Kaupapa is an integrated curriculum using broad based, conceptual themes, involving the integration of multiple disciplines, and allowing learning across wide issues as opposed to narrow topics. Strategic goals develop long term objectives that describe broadly what is to be achieved. Operational goals are short term goals that support the strategic objectives. Theyre the steps to be taken.Kaupapa = collective vision or philosophy (Russell Bishop / Te Kotahitanga defn) Kaupapa is an integrated curriculum using broad based, conceptual themes, involving the integration of multiple disciplines, and allowing learning across wide issues as opposed to narrow topics. Strategic goals develop long term objectives that describe broadly what is to be achieved. Operational goals are short term goals that support the strategic objectives. Theyre the steps to be taken.

    31. Traditional vs Discursive input of new knowledge achieving control evaluation and assessment of set knowledge practising, listening, reproducing all students do the same task co-participate in conversation doing, stating, theorising wide range of assessment practices and purposes employed wide range of learning activities tasks vary among students In Culture Counts (1999) Bishop and Glynn talk about the students being initiators of a discursive interaction, where diverse knowledges are accepted and legitimated. They say: In such a (discursive) classroom, this form of power-sharing relationship will be developed through the process of construction of pedagogical interactions. In Culture Counts (1999) Bishop and Glynn talk about the students being initiators of a discursive interaction, where diverse knowledges are accepted and legitimated. They say: In such a (discursive) classroom, this form of power-sharing relationship will be developed through the process of construction of pedagogical interactions.

    32. The way forward . . . [Give out sheet: CPaBL Maori Approaches to fill in at school in CPaBL team, and follow up] Show Kereana Tawhiwhirangi to finish as the last word. See Te Mana: Additional Comments: The Way Forward (both sections)[Give out sheet: CPaBL Maori Approaches to fill in at school in CPaBL team, and follow up] Show Kereana Tawhiwhirangi to finish as the last word. See Te Mana: Additional Comments: The Way Forward (both sections)