improving understanding of post consumer food waste welcome introduction andrew parry wrap n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Improving Understanding of Post-Consumer Food Waste Welcome & Introduction Andrew Parry (WRAP) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Improving Understanding of Post-Consumer Food Waste Welcome & Introduction Andrew Parry (WRAP)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 18
beck-weiss

Improving Understanding of Post-Consumer Food Waste Welcome & Introduction Andrew Parry (WRAP) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

195 Views
Download Presentation
Improving Understanding of Post-Consumer Food Waste Welcome & Introduction Andrew Parry (WRAP)
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Improving Understanding of Post-Consumer Food WasteWelcome & IntroductionAndrew Parry (WRAP)

  2. Objectives • Share research findings & insights • Identify any gaps and how they might be filled • Outline WRAP’s strategy for food waste reduction • Campaign & behavioural change • Share learnings on behavioural change • Discuss how to maximise the chance of successfully achieving behavioural change wrt food (waste) • Identify potential areas of collaboration • Informal, relaxed and open!

  3. WRAP & food waste

  4. WRAP & Food Waste • Waste & Resources Action Programme • “to minimise the production of waste by consumers and maximise the recycling of materials.” • Specifically: • Minimising household waste • Creating markets for recyclate • Increasing recycling infrastructure • Training & increasing collections • Promotion of consumer recycling

  5. WRAP & Food Waste • WRAP target: • Reduction in food waste of 100,000t by 2008 • Delivery of this target is dependant on the success of: • A consumer-facing campaign • The development and roll-out of innovation aimed at reducing household food waste • Support in the delivery of both of the above by key partners & stakeholders (including Courtauld Commitment signatories)

  6. The scale of the challenge

  7. Food Waste Facts • ca. 6.7mt / yr of household food waste • 19% by weight of household bin • Equivalent to a third of food bought • At least 50% could have been eaten • This is equivalent to 15mt of CO2 • With a retail value of £8bn • ca. £250 - £400 each year / household

  8. A Challenging Environment • Cost, availability & choice • More unplanned shopping trips • Lack of time • 19 min to prepare a meal • Lack of knowledge \ interest • Drop in average household size • Moves towards shorter shelf-life

  9. Understanding the issue – the evidence base

  10. Foodwaste The Evidence Base Scale & Nature of the Problem Consumer Attitudes & Behaviours Trends (social, commercial etc)

  11. Strategy for reducing household food waste

  12. WRAP Food Waste Strategy – Minimisation & Diversion

  13. WRAP Strategy – Food Waste Reduction • Engage with key stakeholders • Retailers, suppliers, FSA, LA’s, community groups etc • Identify barriers to food waste reduction • Technical, commercial, regulatory etc • Encourage innovation & business change • Encourage behavioural change • Launch Food Waste Campaign – Autumn 2007

  14. Starting to Raise Awareness • WRAP PR on Food Waste March 2007 • Significant media activity and consumer reaction • Overwhelmingly positive in tone

  15. How will this be delivered?

  16. Campaign Delivery Direct to consumers Campaign Via strategic partners Local Authorities

  17. Programme • 10.00 Welcome and introduction (Andrew Parry, WRAP) • 10.10 Kitchen Diary: The weight and cost of disposed food (Roy Page & Lorrayne Ventour, Exodus Market Research) • 10.30 Who is wasting all this food and what are they thinking? (Jayne Cox & Jon Fletcher, Brook Lyndhurst) • 10.50 Why worry about food waste? Food waste in the context of overall food chain greenhouse gas emissions. (Tara Garnett, Food Climate Research Network, University of Surrey) • 11.10 Tea and Coffee • 11.15 Food waste in the home (Jon Woolven, IGD ) • 11.30 Discussion: What else do we need to know? • 12.10 WRAP’s strategy to reduce food waste • Strategic engagement and the Courtauld Commitment (Mark Barthel, WRAP) • A consumer-facing food waste campaign (Bronwen Jameson, WRAP) • Press and media relations (Julia Falcon, WRAP) • 12.40 Lunch

  18. Programme • 1.30 How we might achieve behavioural change: Lessons from theory and practice (Paul White, The Social Marketing Practice) • 1.50 Evaluating the impact of WRAP’s campaign (Barbara Leach, WRAP) • 2.00 Behavioural change case studies • Small changes – big difference: behavioural change in Hampshire(Zoe Kimber, Hampshire County Council) • 90@90 project(Ruth Bond, National Federation of Women's Institutes) • 2.40 Discussion: How can WRAP and its partners improve the chances of success in terms of changing food waste behaviour? • 3.30 Discussion: Thoughts on potential collaboration • 4.00 Close and tea