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for a Healthy School

for a Healthy School

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for a Healthy School

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  1. Starring … The 's for a Healthy School Updated 9-2007

  2. Bev Benes, PhD, RD Nebraska Department of Educationhttp://www.nde.state.ne.us/NS Jessye Goertz, MS, RD University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extensionhttp://lancaster.unl.edu/food Alice Henneman, MS, RD Download this PowerPoint at http://www.nde.state.ne.us/ns/slide_shows.htm or http://www.lancaster.unl.edu/food/resources.shtml In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Extension is a division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln cooperating with the counties and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

  3. Download this PowerPoint at:http://lancaster.unl.edu/food/healthy-schools.shtml Resources listed at the end of this PowerPoint may change and/or be updated.

  4. Preview … Scene 4 Food for thought Scene 1 The problem Scene 5Web resources Scene 2It takes a village Scene 3 MyPyramid THE END

  5. It’s show time!

  6. Scene 1The problem Scene 4 Food for thought Scene 5Web resources Scene 2It takes a village Scene 3 MyPyramid THE END

  7. What are American children eating today? Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  8. What are American children eating today? More than 60% of children and adolescents eat too much fat and saturated fat and not enough fruits and vegetables. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  9. What are American children eating today? Only39%of children eat enough fiber (found in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes). An apple a day really can help keep the doctor away! Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  10. What are American children eating today? 85% of adolescent females do not consume enough calcium. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  11. Milk intake decreased 1/3 among adolescent girls. Soft drink intake almost tripled among adolescentboys,from7 to 19 oz • Soft drinkintake almostdoubledamong adolescentgirls, from6 to 11 oz During the past 25 years… At the same time, average daily soft drink consumption … Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  12. Average sugar in one 12-ounce non-diet soft drink (10 teaspoons).Calories: 150 Nutrients in 1 cup milk More nutrients for your $ with dairy!

  13. What are American children eating today? 18 – 20% of calories consumed by children and adolescents come from added sugars. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  14. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Health consequences of poor eating habits include …

  15. What are the effects of poor eating habits? • Overweight children have higher rates of: • Type 2 diabetes • High blood lipid levels • High blood pressure • Bone and joint problems Overweight children are more likely to experience discrimination and lowself-esteem. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  16. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Overweight children and teens are more likely to become overweight and obese adults with increased risk of: • Heart disease • High blood pressure • Stroke • Diabetes • Some types of cancer • Gallbladder disease Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  17. Health care costs The CDC reports in one two-year period, U.S. taxpayers spent $127 million on hospital costs associated with caring for overweight children and adolescents. Preventing obesity and chronic diseases through good nutrition and physical activity. http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/pe_factsheets/pe_pa.htm

  18. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Type 2 diabetes, normally seen among adults, is increasingly found in children. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  19. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Atherosclerosis, the most common cause of heart disease, begins during childhood and is related to blood cholesterol levels which can be affected by what children eat. Ya gotta have heart! Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  20. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Young people who do not get enough calcium are at a greater risk for later development of osteoporosis. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  21. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Too many young people are adopting unsafe or harmful weight loss practices, such as • induced vomiting • use of laxatives • smoking Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  22. Poor eating habits can lead to malnutrition... Photo: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/notes/summerfall03notes/obesityaffects.htm Obesity Eating Disorders

  23. Eating disorders in youth • As many as 7 to 8% of females in the United States suffer from anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa. • These two eating disorders can cause many severe complications and have among the highest mortality rates for any psychiatric disorder. You CAN be too thin. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  24. Source: http://www.4woman.gov/faq/easyread/anorexia-etr.htm

  25. What are the effects of poor eating habits? Poor eating habits can contribute to dental caries, which remains a major cause of school absences. Source: Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/makingithappen.html

  26. So what? “For the first time in this country’s history, health experts question if this generation of children will be first to lead shorter lives.”~ The Obesity Epidemic http://www.nsba.org/site/docs/32700/32675.pdf retrieved 3-6-06

  27. Why focus on schools? “The schools will be where the first victories against obesity will occur.” ~ Kelly Brownell, PhD., director, Yale Center for Eating and Weight Disorders & author of Food Fight in The Obesity Epidemic Students spend 2,000hours per year in school Learn more reasons http://www.nsba.org/site/docs/32700/32675.pdf retrieved 3-6-06

  28. Obesity hurts schools financially “Schools have the unique opportunity – even the responsibility – to teach and model healthful eating and physical activity, both in theory and in practice. Improving children’s health likely improves school performance, and it may even help a school’s bottom line. Therefore, schools have a vested interest in improving the nutrition and increasing the physical activity of their students.” Photo: http://lhncbc.nlm.nih.gov/apdb/phsHistory/resources/sg_satcher.html Dr. Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General and founding chair of Action for Healthy Kids. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  29. More school costs… • Schools with high percentages of students who did not routinely engage in physical activity or eat well had smaller gains in test scores than did other schools. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  30. More school costs… • Students who skip breakfast perform worse on tests and have poor concentration. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  31. More school costs… • Youth not getting adequate nutrients have • lower test scores • increased absenteeism • difficulty concentrating • lower energy levels. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  32. X A+ More school costs… • Physical activity programs are linked to • stronger academic achievement • increased concentration • improved math, reading, and writing test scores. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  33. More school costs… X • Students participating in daily physical education exhibit • better attendance • a more positive attitude to school • superior academic performance. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  34. More school costs... • Extra staff time and attention devoted to students with low academic performance or behavior problems caused by poor nutrition and physical inactivity. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  35. More school costs... • Costs associated with time and staff needed to administer medications needed by students with associated physical and emotional problems. http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Sept. 23, 2004 news release

  36. Another reason for focusing on schools: It’s the law!

  37. Public Law 108-265enacted 6/30/04 Section 204 – Local Wellness Policies “Not later than the first day of the school year beginning after June 30, 2006, each local educational agency … shall establish a local school wellness policy.” The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004

  38. School Wellness PolicyBasic Components: 1.Policies targeting: • Nutrition education • Physical activity • Other school-based activities to promote wellness More components

  39. School Wellness PolicyBasic Components: • Guidelines for reimbursable meals • Nutrition guidelines for all foods at school • Plan for measuring implementation 5. Community involvement

  40. School Wellness PolicyProvisions: Required involvement at the local level • Parents • Students • School Meals Program Representatives • School Board Members • School Administrators and Teachers • Community Members

  41. School Wellness PolicyImplementation: “The physical activity and eating behaviors that affect weight are influenced by many sectors of society, including families, communities, organizations, health care providers, faith-based institutions, businesses, government agencies, the media, and schools. The involvement of all of these sectors will be needed to reverse the epidemic.” -State Education Standard 12-04

  42. If for no other reason … “Be nice to your kids. They’ll choose your nursing home.” ~ Seen on a bumper sticker

  43. Scene 4 Food for thought Scene 1 The problem Scene 5Web resources Scene 2 It takes a village Scene 3 MyPyramid THE END

  44. It takes a village

  45. It takes a village: Students • Eat smart and move more to look, feel and do your best. • Get informed and involved. • Set goals for yourself. • Serve as a role model to younger students. • Eat the school breakfast, school lunch and healthy snacks. Source: Eat Smart: North Carolina’s Recommended Standards for all Foods Available in School

  46. It takes a village: Families • Eat smart and move more – children are watching you. • Support school meal programs – eat breakfast and lunch at school. • Learn how Child Nutrition Programs are financed and discuss it with others. • Advocate for healthy school meals and nutrition education. • Provide healthy snacks or fun physical activity for parties and events. Source: Eat Smart: North Carolina’s Recommended Standards for all Foods Available in School

  47. Non-food celebrations: Some ideas… • Walk with principal. • Non-food treats may be desirable in relation to food allergies and food safety. • Examples: pencils, stickers, bookmarks, wash-off tattoos • Celebrate birthdays with a non-food treat (or limit celebrations to once a month with food treats). • Do something fun, i.e. decorate a jack-o-lantern (with magic markers).

  48. Food celebrations: Some ideas… Establish guidelines for foods provided to students for school parties and snacks. • Consistent message with cafeteria • Incorporate nutrition education about these foods in classroom lessons • Offer choices between “acceptable” foods

  49. It takes a village: Teachers • Teach and role model good nutrition and physical activity. • Coordinate nutrition education with cafeteria staff. • Teach life skills – not just the facts. • Eat with students – support school meal programs. • Use non-food rewards. Source: Eat Smart: North Carolina’s Recommended Standards for all Foods Available in School

  50. Disadvantages of using food as a reward/incentive • Undermines nutrition being taught in the school environment. • Encourages over consumption of foods high in added sugar and fat. • Teaches kids to eat when they’re not hungry to reward themselves. • MORE disadvantages… Source: Michigan State University Extension