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Kinesthetics in the Classroom

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  1. Kinesthetics in the Classroom A Different Approach on Vocabulary Instruction Kaitlin, Nathan, Sam, & Victoria

  2. Game Plan • Introductions • Please stand (Nathan) • Split up into “content groups” • Science + 2 • Math + 1 + Music

  3. Total Physical Response (TPR) • Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences • kinesthetic learners • Secondary students have a lot of energy • kinesthetics provides a constructive channel of energy while learning.

  4. What is TPR? • Information received through kinesthetics increases retention (Block 461) • Kinesthetic motions increase comprehension of abstract concepts & vocabulary through mental representations. (Block 461) • Recent research proposes that the cerebellum is involved in reading; previously it was considered responsible for primarily kinesthetic function. • coincidence? (Armstong 79)

  5. TPR & English Language Learners • Often used in language/vocabulary class. • Language is introduced by the teacher verbally along with a modeled appropriate action. • Small groups of students copy the verbalization and action as the rest of the class observes. • The original work by James Asher (1966) • experimental groups had significantly higher levels of comprehension and retention when utilizing TPR. (Asher 79)

  6. TIME - OUT • In your groups, Please: • Discuss how you could use TPR with ELLs in your subject area • Write your best idea on the board

  7. Guided Role - Play • Assists teachers in implementing challenging texts into the classroom. • Students role-play a scenario from the reading. Aid students ability to identify respective concepts and important vocabulary in the reading (Simon 136) • Brief In-Class Role Plays (BIRPs) - short, real-life situations for students to “act out.” • increases student motivation, problem-solving skills, critical thinking skills, creativity, social skills, and performance on testing. (Sojka 25) • Charades/Role playing for concept acquisition- groups are given several terms and attempt to act out each term while the class guesses the term. (Schulte 15)

  8. TIME - OUT • In your groups, Please: • Discuss how you could use guided role-play in your subject. • Write your best idea on the board

  9. Comprehension Process Motions (CPMs) • Movements that assign visual and physical representations of comprehension processes including finding main ideas, inferring, predicting, and clarifying. • Research has shown that CPM implementation promotes higher levels of comprehension and vocabulary performance on various tests. (Block 468)

  10. TIME - OUT • In your groups, Please: • Discuss how you could use CPMs in your subject. • Write your best idea on the board

  11. Wrap - up • Significantly higher levels of comprehension and retention when utilizing TPR • (Asher 79) • Role play builds prior knowledge of ideas and improves comprehension of complex material • Comprehension Process Motions (CPM) improves comprehension and vocabulary performance • (Block 468)

  12. Wrap - up • How we used kinesthetic teaching aids during our presentation • Candy • Stretching • Moving into groups • Getting up to the board

  13. References Armstrong, T. (2004). Making the Words Roar. Educational Leadership, 61(6), 78-81. http://search.ebscohost.com Asher, J., & National Federation of Modern Language Teachers, A. (1966). The Learning Strategy of the Total Physical Response: A Review. The Modern Language Journal.http://search.ebscohost.com Block, C., Parris, S., & Whiteley, C. (2008). CPMs: A Kinesthetic Comprehension Strategy. Reading Teacher, 61(6), 460-470. http://search.ebscohost.com Schulte, P. (2005). Social Studies in Motion: Learning with the Whole Person. Social Studies and the Young Learner, 17(4), 13-16. http://search.ebscohost.com Simon, L. (2008). “I Wouldn’t Choose It, but I Don’t Regret Reading It”: Scaffolding Students’ Engagement With Complex Texts. |sl~~rl','');|Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, v52 n2 p134-143. http://search.ebscohost.com Sojka, J., & Fish, M. (2008). Brief In-Class Role Plays: An Experiential Teaching Tool Targeted To Generation Y Students. Marketing Education Review, 18(1), 25-31.http://search.ebscohost.com