edinboro university course essential computing csci104 fall 2009 lecture 5
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Edinboro University Course: Essential Computing CSCI104 Fall 2009 Lecture 5

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Edinboro University Course: Essential Computing CSCI104 Fall 2009 Lecture 5 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 121 Views
  • Uploaded on

Edinboro University Course: Essential Computing CSCI104 Fall 2009 Lecture 5 . Instructor: Stan Schuyler Contact: [email protected] voice: Ext. 1160. Lecture 5 - Outline. Start Windows Explorer Establish the “Views” Find Your CS104 Folder

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Edinboro University Course: Essential Computing CSCI104 Fall 2009 Lecture 5' - bathsheba


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
edinboro university course essential computing csci104 fall 2009 lecture 5

Edinboro UniversityCourse:Essential ComputingCSCI104Fall 2009Lecture 5

Instructor: Stan Schuyler

Contact:

[email protected]

voice: Ext. 1160

lecture 5 outline
Lecture 5 - Outline
  • Start Windows Explorer
    • Establish the “Views”
    • Find Your CS104 Folder
  • Continuing with PC Architecture Lesson from Last Week
    • Review Software Architecture
    • Internals
    • Networking Components
  • Onward into Word
    • Making Changes
    • Complete Figures 3, 4 and 5, review paste special, resizing
    • Quick Styles and Style Modification
    • Lists and numbering versus Heading levels
    • Do Multi-level Heading Numbering Again
for those who were absent
For those who were Absent
  • For those being left behind because they were …! 
  • Locate your CS104 folder
  • Make a new Folder “Class4” (the one you were not here for!), and double click to get in it.
  • Go the Address Bar and enter the class website
    • http://users.edinboro.edu/sschuyler
    • Download to your Class3 folder:
      • lastname_Cls4Catchup.doc and
      • lastname_Cls4Catchup.ppt
      • Change “lastname” to your “lastname”
    • Now go up one folder level to your CS104 folder
  • Follow my Directions in class
getting the notes to start today
Getting the Notes to Start Today
  • In your CS104 Section
  • Folder and File Copying
    • Locate your Class4 folder
    • Left click it ONCE to select it
    • Click “Copy” on the Ribbon (or CTRL + “c” keys)
    • Click “Paste on the Ribbon (or CTRL + “v” keys)
    • Produces a “Copy of Class4” folder
  • Change the Name “Copy of Class4”
    • Left click it ONCE and wait a one second
    • Then left click it again to select the Folder name text
    • Change the Folder Name to “Class5”
  • Double click the Class5 folder to open it
renaming the files in your class4 folder
Renaming the Files in your Class4 Folder
  • File Name change
    • Left click once your lastname_Cls4Notes.doc
    • Wait a second and left click again to highlight the name
    • Change the name to lastname_Cls5Notes.doc
  • Repeat for:
    • lastname_Cls4Notes.ppt to lastname_Cls5Notes.ppt
    • Open lastname_Cls5Notes.doc
where we left off on pc architecture
Where we left off on PC Architecture
  • State of lastname_Cls5Notes.ppt
  • State of lastname_Cls5Notes.doc
software and applications
Software

App #1

App #2

App #k

Software and Applications
  • I suggest you think of these as layers of a cake:
  • Software (programs) run on computing platforms (Mainframe, Server, PC, or microcomputer, etc.)
  • An Operating System (OS) is software that runs directly on computing hardware and enables Applications to use the functions of the hardware platform.
  • An Application is software that runs on an Operating System and enables a user to accomplish a task

OS

Hardware

software layers and components
Word

IE

Explorer

Excel

PowerPoint

Software Layers and Components

Windows XP 2003 Operating System (OS)

Hardware

Other OSs include: Vista, MAC OS, Unix, Linux

inside the pc the atomic units
Inside the PC – The “Atomic Units”
  • All computers are based on the binary number system
    • “binary” means 2 values
    • “off” or “on”: zero or one
  • A bit or binary digit is
    • the smallest unit of memory
    • has one of two values: 0 or 1
  • A byte is
    • the smallest addressable unit of memory
    • Contains 8 bits
    • Can hold values from 0 to 256 (or 28)
    • Values can be interpreted as numbers or as characters
    • Can be assembled to form larger units of memory

On

Off

inside the pc
Inside the PC
  • Characters are stored as numeric values called “codes”
    • The codes were standardized by the American Nat’l Std.s Institute (ANSI)
    • The standard codes were called the “American Standard Code for Information Interchange” or ASCII
  • ASCII provides for 256 (or 28) characters (the number of values a byte can hold)
    • 01000001 – A
    • 01000010 – B
    • etc.
    • Includes codes for: upper vs. lower case letter, digits, punctuation, and special characters
computer memory
Computer Memory
  • Measured in bytes
    • 1 Kilobyte = 210 characters (~1,000 bytes, actually 1024)
    • 1 Megabyte = 220 characters (~1,000,000 bytes)
    • 1 Gigabyte = 230 characters (~1,000,000,000 bytes)
    • 1 Terabyte = 240 characters (~1,000,000,000,000 bytes)
  • Two Types:
    • ROM – Read Only Memory (retains values without power)
    • RAM – Random Access Memory (loses values without power)
    • FLASH – slower RAM that retains values without power (Jump Drives)
  • The Original PC had 16KB of RAM memory
  • Today’s PCs Need 512 MB or 1 GB of RAM
    • Keep multiple programs & data files in memory
    • Graphic-intensive programs demand a lot of memory
    • Transient (erased when power turned off or fails)
      • Consider a UPS (uninterrupted power supply)
other input devices the digital camera
Other Input Devices - The Digital Camera
  • Image Memory is sized in terms of “Picture Elements”
  • A Picture Element is called a “pixel”
    • A pixel is a dot (point of light) in an image
    • A pixel is the smallest unit of image that can be addressed (turned on or off)
    • A pixel may have 1 or more bits associated with it
    • Pixels with 1 bit are “black or white”
    • Pixels with 2 or more bits may be “gray scale” or “color”
  • An image is stored on a photosensitive computer chip, which converts the image to a series of pixel values.
    • 3.5 megapixels is entry-level
    • 6 megapixels is a useful level
  • There is no film; images are stored in memory; the more memory the more pictures
    • 1 GB is suggested
heading styles and simple usage
Heading Styles and Simple Usage

Use Heading Styles to automatically produce a TOC: “TOC” means  Table of Contents

    • Heading
    • means the sub heading level in an outline sense
    • Corresponds to the default indention level
    • Can be associated with a multi-level numbering scheme (which we do next class)
  • Select text line to become a Chapter or Subsection Heading
    • Click the Heading <#> desired in the Ribbon “Styles Box”
    • Use the “increase” or “decrease” indent icon in the Ribbon “Paragraph Box” to change the
a simple automatic toc
A Simple Automatic TOC
  • Put the cursor where you want the TOC
  • On the Ribbon “Reference” Tab select:
  • Table of contents Pull down (no options)
    • Select design of contents
    • TOC appears

OR

  • Table of Contents Pull Down – with control of options
    • Instead of selecting design of content, go to bottom of pane
    • Select “Insert Table of Contents”
    • TOC Dialog box appears
    • Select “Options” button
    • Set TOC level for the “styles” you want to see in the TOC
    • “OK”, then “OK” again
continuing the pc architecture paper
Continuing the PC Architecture Paper
  • Inserting
  • Making Changes
  • Modify Figure 2
  • Review diagram copying
  • Review Paste special
  • Size Adjusting
  • Printing today
introduction to networks
Introduction to Networks
  • 1950’s: Computers were isolated
    • Data transported between them used physical media
    • paper tape, punched cards, magnetic tape and couriers
  • Early 1960’s: Direct Local Networking (pre-LAN)
    • Engineers started connecting local computers via special cables and interfaces
  • Mid 1960’s: Wide Area Networking (WAN)
    • started using leased telephone lines
    • special equipment to connect them across large distances.
  • Late 1960’s: Metropolitan Area Networking (MAN)
    • using public telephone lines and low speed modems to connect to computers.
  • The connection devices and lines taken together are called Networks
introduction to networks17
Introduction to Networks
  • 1969: Department of Defense
    • Network should operate in the face of damaged links.
    • The Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) started the project
    • “ARPA net” was developed as a “Network of Networks”
    • Became known as the “Internet” in the late 1980’s
from lan to wan
From LAN to WAN

(a) Home Network

(b) Local Area Network

the internet and world wide web
The Internet

Network of networks

Supports addressing

Manages connections

Transports Data in packets

The World Wide Web

Began in 1991 at the European Particle Physics Laboratory (CERN) in Switzerland

A subset of all computers connected to the Internet which have and allow access to hypertext or hypermedia documents

Unlimited “information”

Unlimited “disinformation”

These documents contain references (links) to other documents which may be on a different computer anywhere in the world

The Internet and World Wide Web
a message travels the internet
A message travels the Internet

All that matters is the beginning and ending address

review heading styles and usage
Review Heading Styles and Usage

To automatically produce a numbered TOC:

    • Multi-level Heading numbering
  • Setting a Multi-level Numbering System for Heading Styles
    • Select the very first text line that is a “Heading 1” style
    • On the Ribbon “Paragraph Box” locate the “Multi-level List” pull down icon
    • Select the numbering style that looks like the left figure:

1  this,NOT 1.

1.1 1.1

1.1.1 1.1.1

… …

1.1.1.1.1.1 1.1.1.1.1.1

generating the automatic toc
Generating the Automatic TOC
  • Put the cursor where you want the TOC
  • On the Ribbon “Reference” Tab select:
  • Table of Contents Pull Down – with control of options
    • Instead of selecting design of content, go to bottom of pane
    • Select “Insert Table of Contents”
    • TOC Dialog box appears
    • Select “Options” button
    • Set TOC level for the “styles” you want to see in the TOC
    • “OK”, then “OK” again
slide24
Next
  • NEXT ASSIGNMENT:
    • Look it up in your Syllabus-Schedule
ad