Strategy for Departmental Innovation Recruiting and retaining top talent - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

strategy for departmental innovation recruiting and retaining top talent n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Strategy for Departmental Innovation Recruiting and retaining top talent PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Strategy for Departmental Innovation Recruiting and retaining top talent

play fullscreen
1 / 32
Strategy for Departmental Innovation Recruiting and retaining top talent
182 Views
Download Presentation
basil
Download Presentation

Strategy for Departmental Innovation Recruiting and retaining top talent

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Strategy for Departmental InnovationRecruiting and retaining top talent R. Kevin Grigsby AAMC Senior Director December 3, 2010

  2. Objectives • • Understand the rationale for investing in the early identification and development of top talent • • Realize the needs and benefits of succession planning as a vehicle for cultural change, individual change, and servant leadership • • Become skilled in giving meaningful feedback to develop top talent and facilitate the successful transition into senior leadership roles

  3. Every hire is an investment . . . • Adequate due diligence before hiring • Don’t make commitments you cannot keep • Diversity your portfolio • Protect your investments!

  4. Search committees • Searching and screening are the primary responsibilities of search committees • Search committees should not be asked to select candidates • Search committees should not be asked to negotiate with candidates • Search committees should actively search • Passive approach is not effective

  5. Search committee chairs • Search committee chair is one of the most important leadership roles in the AMC • Excellent leadership skills • Values based with high integrity • Communication skills are imperative • Organized; understands importance of process • High degree of emotional intelligence

  6. Two major tasks of the executive • Charging the committee • Description of need • Responsibilities of the search committee • Breadth of the search • Timeline • Selecting and negotiating with finalists

  7. Search firms? • Exception rather than the rule • 26% clinical department chairs • 4% basic science chairs • 6% center/institute directors • Pros are many . . . • Reduces typical search by 3 months • Cons are many . . . • Adds expense

  8. Internal search coordination • Creating concierge level service is the goal • Increases efficiency • Makes a much better impression on candidates • Candidates are interviewing you and your campus • Delivers the message that the candidate is appreciated

  9. Internal search coordination • Creating concierge level service is the goal • Increases efficiency • Makes a much better impression on candidates • Candidates are interviewing you and your campus • Delivers the message that the candidate is appreciated

  10. Candidate attributes • Orientation toward the future • Values aligned with those of the organization. • Ability to collaborate and work as a team member. • Some degree of business savvy and/or entrepreneurial spirit. • Good understanding of clinical and translational research.

  11. Avoiding bias in the process • Unconscious bias is well-documented • Bias training should be mandatory for ALL search committee members • Search committee chairs should be accountable for presenting a diverse slate • Demonstrate promising practices in screening and interviewing • Executives must be vigilant • May insist that the committee expand the pool

  12. Evaluating candidates • Screening • CV alone is insufficient • Cover letters should address the call for applications and nominations • Leadership/management summaries are of value • Visits • Interviews

  13. Recruitment practices • Clear understanding of commitments and expectations by both parties • Candidates are interviewing YOU • Repeatedly ask yourself and the search committee members: Is this how I/you would want to be treated as a candidate?

  14. Developing an offer letter • Ask candidate to prepare a plan • Plan should include request for resources • Be prepared to make commitments • Be prepared to set limits

  15. Good offer letters • Use the process to develop a vision and plan for the future with mutual appeal • Allocation of effort across missions is imperative • Use effort rather than time • Typical letter for a department chair: 12 pages

  16. Negotiating for resources • Don’t create a dowry!!! • Don’t bait and switch!!! • Tie each commitment to an expectation • Release resources as milestones are met

  17. Prevent a binge-purge cycle • Dowry is given • Dowry invested poorly and is exhausted • Chair is released • Search process starts over again

  18. Negotiating compensation • Think about having tools in the toolbox . . . • Salary • Incentives • Bonuses • Protected effort • Resources • Administrative support • Access to technical resources

  19. Barriers . . . • Current role encompasses more than CME • Multiple clinical affiliates with no central administrative (power) structure • Being able to express to the physician leaders and learners exactly what is needed for the change and to get them to embrace that change.

  20. Transition to new leadership • Interim leaders may be great resources • Not too close; not too far in terms of support • Build mentor networks • Vice/associate deans are best allies

  21. Search process innovations • Growing use of external search firms • “Buying in bulk” from search firms • Creating internal search firms • Leadership development dean positions • Search committee “cores” • Interim leadership experience offers a “test drive”

  22. Retaining top talent • New generation requires new ways of working • $$ is not as attractive as other perks • Create a culture that reflects values • “Spin” won’t help you • Invest in faculty ongoing faculty development • Invest in leadership development • Organizational integrity is key to keeping the best and the brightest . . .

  23. Take your eyes off the rear view mirror – Look through the windshield! • Incentives and rewards of the past are no longer as enticing • Growth will not necessarily result in success • Shift focus on sustainability • Recruit strategically

  24. Summary • Invest in chair and committee member appointments • Seek future orientation in candidates • Offer concierge level service • Invest in negotiation/planning process • Avoid bait and switch • Avoid binge and purge

  25. Talent management of future-oriented candidates • Requires promoting scholarship at the same time as asking clinicians and scientists to maximize revenue, ensure efficient use of resources, and “right-size” the entire enterprise • Organizational cultures must reward interdependence and support work-life balance

  26. Goal of performance evaluation: review the past and plan for the future To evaluate performance in each mission area To set standards and expectations for each mission area To plan for development in each mission area A conversation is necessary…

  27. Encourage self-assessment Review evaluation from the previous year In what areas have expectations been met or exceeded? In what areas have expectations fallen short? What barriers or challenges might explain potential problem areas? What needs to change to be successful in the upcoming year?

  28. Stake out realistic targets • What is needed to meet expectations? • Clinical expectations • Research expectations • Teaching responsibilities • Scholarly products • Service responsibilities or commitments

  29. Establish clear assessment metrics Clinician…(Productivity)…Clinic Director Researcher…(Funding)…PI/Lab Manager Teacher…(Evaluations)…Course Director Service…(Committees)…Leadership Outreach…(Engagement)…Scholarship

  30. Tactful, honest statements of fact will make the experience less anxiety provoking for everyone involved