AGED - 3103 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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AGED - 3103

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  1. AGED - 3103 Using Community Resources to Support Instruction

  2. Age Education Technical Experience Teaching Experience 22 to 24 B.S. or M.A. SAE, Work Experience, College Courses AGED 3103, Twelve weeks of student teaching Profile of a First Year Ag Teacher

  3. The “Wise Owl” Syndrome • Named after the Advisors part in Opening Ceremonies. • May effect as many as 80% of First Year Teachers. (S.W.A.G.) • Can lead to attempts of “Super Human” feats. • May cause teachers to feel they must become the “Fountain of All Knowledge”.

  4. Preventing the “Wise Owl” Syndrome • Remember that your job as a teacher is to be the “Organizer of the Learning Process”. • Remember that you are “human” and that learning along with your students can be a rewarding experience for both of you. • Use every opportunity to engage your community in assisting you in delivering quality experiences for your students.

  5. Informal types of community resources • Guest speakers • Field trips • Tours • Have resource people teach you • Have resource people teach your classes • Make sure that informal types are part of a “formal” lesson plan.

  6. Formal types of community resources • Advisory Committees • Booster Clubs • FFA Alumni • Young Farmers

  7. Advisory Committees Members are appointed Members are chosen based on some criteria Members provide advice Committee provides a link between the community and the ag ed program Booster Clubs Members join Membership is open to all Members provide support The club brings the resources of the community to the ag ed program Advisory Committees vs Booster Clubs

  8. Advisory Committee Representation • Based upon the community • Types of farming • Types of agribusiness • Former students • Former parents of students • School counselors • School administrators (ex-officio)

  9. Number of members • Five to nine (odd numbers work best) • Include male and female representatives • Take into account ethnicity, age, religion, location of committee members in the community (the make-up of the committee should mirror your community)

  10. Selection of members • Recommended by ag ed instructor • Selected by advisory committee • Appointed by superintendent • Serve at the pleasure of the board of education

  11. Organizing an advisory committee • Constitution and By-laws • Officers • Terms of membership • Meeting times, dates, etc. • Purpose of the committee • Identify the role of the ag ed instructor and administration

  12. Areas the committee can help • Classroom and Laboratory • Curriculum • Lab equipment • Facilities • Budget • Safety • Resource people

  13. Areas a committee can help (cont.) • S.A.E. • Determine policy • Suggest training stations • Assist with record keeping

  14. Areas a committee can help (cont.) • FFA • Adult chaperones • Judge awards and applications • Review chapter P.O.A. • Conduct programs with the chapter

  15. Areas a committee can help (cont.) • Community and Program Development • Assist in deciding “what” should be taught • Assist in program evaluation • Assist with Public Relations • Provide continuity when instructors change

  16. Areas a committee can help (cont.) • Adult and Young Farmer • Determine program of study • Help secure financing • Recruit students

  17. Avoid the “Wise Owl” Syndrome

  18. Use Community Resources to Support Instruction