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The Next Big Challenge

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  1. The Next Big Challenge HETTANZ June 2012 Lesley Pearce Technology National Coordinator

  2. Learning intentions • Develop an understanding of the importance in teaching literacy in a food and/or textile programme • Develop some literacy strategies

  3. Literacy

  4. Why focus on literacy? • Why focus on this? Surely this is the responsibility of • Surely this is the responsibility of the other curriculum areas, Im a practical hands on subject!! • Why dedicate time to literacy, when demands on developing quality practical skills are at a premium? • What are the benefits to the learners? • What are the benfits to NZ economy? Why focus on this? Surely this is the responsibility of • the other curriculum areas, I’m a practical hands on subject!! • Why dedicate time to literacy, when demands on developing • quality practical skills are at a premium? • What are the benefits to the learners? • Capability, confidence, achievement, self esteem. • the other curriculum areas, I’m a practical hands on subject!! • Why dedicate time to literacy, when demands on developing • quality practical skills are at a premium? • What are the benefits to the learners? • Capability, confidence, achievement, self esteem. • Why focus on this? Surely this is the responsibility of • the other curriculum areas, I’m a practical hands on subject!! • Why dedicate time to literacy, when demands on developing • quality practical skills are at a premium? • What are the benefits to the learners? • Capability, confidence, achievement, self esteem.

  5. e-asTTle national profile A= advanced, meets the expected criteria B = basic at entry level for level P = proficient, 2/3rds on target, mastering criteria

  6. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1I9tuScLUA

  7. PISA 2010 • 470,000 15-years-old students representing 65 nations and territories participated in PISA 2009. • An additional 50,000 students representing 9 nations were tested in 2010

  8. PISA 2009 Reading literacy True or False • The performance of NZ 15 year old students is about average for the OECD countries. T/F • The reading performance of NZ students, on average, has not changed significantly in the last 9 years. T/F • NZ has one of the widest gaps between high performing students and low performing students in reading in the OECD. T/F • NZ has one of the narrowest gaps between male and female achievement in reading in the OECD.  T/F

  9. Maori students perform on average below the OECD average.  T/F • Pasifika students in NZ perform on average below the OECD average T/F • Asian students in NZ perform on average below the OECD average T/F • High levels of immigration in NZ have a negative effect on achievement T/F • There is no correlation between achievement and whether students are socio-economically advantaged or disadvantage T/F • There is a correlation between students whose parents read to them regularly in their first year at primary school and achievement T/F

  10. Reading literacy proficiency levels PISA

  11. What does NZ’s performance look like? • The OECD mean is 493. • NZ mean score is 521. • NZ Pakeha/European mean is 541 • Asian mean is 522 • Maori mean is 478 • Pasifika mean is 448 • In NZ 4,643 students from 163 schools took part.

  12. What did PISA reading literacy test? The reading tasks covered 3 dimensions: • Knowledge (the form of the reading materials) Continuous texts, non-continuous texts, mixed texts and multiple texts • Competencies or aspects (types of reading tasks or process) Access and retrieve, integrate and interpret, reflect and evaluate • Situations or context (the use for which the text is constructed) Personal, educational and occupational and public and scientific

  13. Findings: Continuous vs non-continuous texts • NZ students performed strongly on tasks related to non-continuous texts (lists, diagrams, graphs, tables) – 532 points. • Not as strong on continuous texts (sentences, paragraphs) – 518 points. • Most countries did not have more than a 10 point difference between continuous and non-continuous text scores. • Females out-performed males in both types but the gap was wider with continuous texts.

  14. Findings: Access and retrieve, integrate and interpret • NZ students performed strongly in this area. • 5 countries outperformed NZ. • NZ had a significant gap between males and females in this area (40 points).

  15. Students’ use of literacy strategies Students who use appropriate strategies to understand and remember what they read performed 73 points higher than students who use strategies the least. Strategies include: • underlining important parts in the text • discussing what they read with others

  16. Achieving students • figure out what they need to learn • ensure they understand what they read • figure out concepts they have not fully grasped • try and remember the most important points • look for additional clarifying information when they don’t understand what they have read

  17. Summarising information The gap between students who know most about summarising and those who know the least is 107 points.

  18. NCEA level 1Technology 2011 6 Technology Externals • N/A nationally Technology = 35.35% • N/A nationally English = 25% • N/A Maori 53.64% • N/A Pasifika 63.7% • Excellent Technology = 4.7% • Excellent English = 8.9%

  19. Students can gain literacy credits in Technology by completing either of the following: • Literacy is the written and oral language people use in their everyday life and work. It includes reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Skills in this area are essential for good communication, active participation, critical thinking and problem solving. • The three standards have been written on the basis they will be assessed using naturally occurring evidence drawn from authentic contexts. This lends itself to assessment via portfolio.

  20. Literacy credits are gained through the experiences provided while undertaking NCEA achievement standards. • Literacy credits are gained through the experiences provided while undertaking NCEA literacy unit standards

  21. Activities • Word jumble • Skim the article: The Bright, Hi-Tech Future of Food Preservation • Vocab barrier activity • Jigsaw reading

  22. Word Jumble

  23. Read Article The Bright, Hi-tech Future of Food Preservation by David freedman What clues are you getting from the title and image before reading?

  24. Word and definition barrier activity • The purpose of the activity • The learners practice matching words with definitions by using key words, recalling the definitions and checking their understanding. • The teaching points • Active listening and asking for key phrases to be re-read. • Discussing possibilities and identifying connections. • Giving constructive feedback. • Recalling learnt vocabulary. • Resources • Lists of key words and matching definitions (each on separate lists).

  25. Jigsaw reading • This is an approach to reading that involves the students in speaking and summarising skills. It is very useful when working with short authentic texts such as newspaper articles. • A great way to introduce speaking into a reading activity. It provides a real opportunity for genuine communication. In real life, we may tell people about a news article we have read, so this is a classroom activity that is fairly authentic.

  26. Jigsaw reading • Divide into 4 expert groups • In group all read the same information. • Discuss and agree what the two main ideas are. Write one idea in each box. • Reform groups so each group has a 1, 2, 3 and 4 • Person from group 1 explains to others what the text was about. Followed by the others • Record all ideas down.

  27. Writing

  28. What do we know about the writing we ask of our students? • What types of writing tasks do students in my classes do? • Are they –  short answer  paragraph  long [page] answer or essay ? • What purposes do these writing tasks have? •  formative practice  assessment  student reflection  information recording [notes] presentation of ideas / of learning

  29. For one of these writing tasks that my students are working on now or have done very recently….. ……I know how this piece of writing should be structured… •  what sections it must have = •  what headings [& sub-headings] = •  whether full sentences or if bulleting is allowed = •  how many sentences = •  topic sentences must be used = •  type of supporting details = •  number of supporting details required = •  what paragraph structure = •  what paragraph order = •  what long answer or essay structure = •  are diagrams to be included / permitted = •  is copying allowed or must student use own words =

  30. I know the features of the language which is to be used for this piece of writing … • describe = •  explain = •  persuade = •  discuss = •  recount = •  evaluate = •  analyse = •  narrate = •  instruct =

  31. I know how far along the writing process steps this piece of writing has to progress … • plan •  draft •  edited and reworked •  conventions expected = •  degree of accuracy required = •  form of publication = •  should quotations be included = •  must sources be acknowledged =

  32. I know the skills the student learner needs to demonstrate in order to accomplish this piece of writing ..  planning  selecting material  making material their own  drafting proof-reading  revising / editing  presenting at publication level 

  33. Scoping the teaching and learning for: • AS91353 (2.62) Demonstrate understanding of advanced concepts used in preservation and packaging for product storage 4 credits Internal

  34. Evaluation • What are the key understandings you will take back to the classroom?