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Grade Level Expectations A New Level of Specificity

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  1. Grade Level ExpectationsA New Level of Specificity Introducing Reading GLEs Mary Damascus Coordinator, Staff Development Central Valley School District

  2. 1993—Basic Education Act “… to provide students with the opportunity to become responsible citizens, to contribute to their own economic well-being, and to that of their families and communities, and to enjoy productive and satisfying lives.” - Basic Education Act (Goal)

  3. Basic Education Act Requirements • Establish: • Clear, challenging academic learning standards for all students • An assessment system • An accountability system

  4. Washington State Student Learning Goals • Readwith comprehension, write with skill, and communicate effectively and responsibly in a variety of ways and settings; • Know and apply the core concepts and principles of mathematics; social, physical, and life sciences; civics and history; geography; arts; and health and fitness; • Think analytically, logically, and creatively, and to integrate experience and knowledge to form reasoned judgments and solve problems; and • Understandthe importance of work and how performance, effort, and decisions directly affect future career and educational opportunities.

  5. 9 Characteristics of High Performing Schools • Clear and Shared Focus • High Standards and Expectations for ALL Students • Effective School Leadership • High Levels of Collaboration and Communication • Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Aligned with Standards • Frequent Monitoring of Learning and Teaching • Focused Professional Development • Supportive Learning Environment • High Level of Parent and Community Involvement

  6. A “…guaranteed and viable curriculum is the #1 school-level factor on impact of student achievement.” — Marzano, What Works in Schools Research Finding…

  7. Washington State ESEA Plan • Challenging Academic Content Standards • EALRs—Essential Academic Learning Requirements • GLEs—Grade Level Expectations • Reading, Mathematics, Science • Assessments • Reading and Mathematics Assessments • Grades 3-8 and 10 beginning 2005-06 • Science Assessments • Grades 5, 8, 10 beginning 2007-08

  8. Key Questions for Educators • What do we want students to learn? • How will we know they have learned? • How will we respond to students who have not learned?

  9. Document Structure • Introduction • Core K-10 EALRs/GLEs • Appendix

  10. Introduction—Creating GLEs • Grounding the Work in Research • Cognitive Demand—Bloom’s Taxonomy • Text Complexity Increases Through the Grades • Alignment for Student Achievement

  11. Curriculum District and School Curriculum Documents Based on EALRs/GLEs Instruction Pedagogy and Use of Instructional Resources Assessment Multiple Measures of Learning Introduction—Alignment STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT • The importance of curriculum alignment cannot be overstated. It is critical that the curriculum, instructionand assessmentalign. The Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRs), which now include the Grade Level Expectations (GLEs), form the basis of district and school curriculum. Instruction refers to the teacher’s pedagogy and use of instructional resources. Assessmentincludes all diagnostic, formative, and summative classroom-based assessments, as well as the WASL.

  12. Introduction—Overview of K-10 Reading Instruction • K-10 continuum (pages 4-5) • Proficiency based

  13. Grade Level Expectations (GLEs) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Introduction—EALR Structure with GLES K-10 EALR Statement K-10 Component • Evidence of Learning • Evidence of Learning

  14. Introduction—Reading EALRs • EALR 1: The student understands and uses different skills and strategies to read. • Phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary • EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read. • Comprehension • EALR 3: The student reads different materials for a variety of purposes. • Types of text—literary and informational • EALR 4: The student sets goals and evaluates progress to improve reading. • Assess strengths and weaknesses and develop reading interest

  15. Core K-10 EALRs/GLEs—Four Reading EALRs • EALR 1: Reading word skills and strategies • Pages 8-15 • EALR 2: Reading for understanding • Pages 16-36 • EALR 3: What materials and why • Pages 37-42 • EALR 4: Student goal setting and monitoring progress • Pages 43-47

  16. Appendix • Cognitive Demand—Bloom’s Taxonomy • Glossary • Acknowledgements

  17. Component 1.3: Build vocabulary through wide reading • GLE 1.3.1: • Understand and apply new vocabulary • Evidence of Learning EALR 1: The student understands and uses different strategies to read The EALR with GLE Numbering System Grade Level: X 1.3.1

  18. Practice with Numbering System • 1.3.1 • Pages 12 and 13 (K-7) • 2.3.3 • Pages 28 and 29 (2-10) • 3.2.1 • Pages 38 and 39 (K-4)

  19. Key Document Concepts • K-10 Continuum • Differentiated instruction options • (At, below, or above) • Shaded Areas • Proficiency expected at an earlier or later grade level • Practice for these skills must continue for maintenance of proficiency

  20. Grade Level Expectations Each GLE contains: A statement ofcognitive demandand the essential content or process to be learned Evidence of Learning is a bulleted list of student demonstrations that provides educators with common illustrations of the learning • . . . explain what students should knowand be able to do.

  21. EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read. Component 2.2:Understand and apply knowledge of text components to comprehend text Understanding the Reading GLEs Grade Level Expectation • Retell stories with the correct sequence of events. (Note: Story telling order can differ between cultures. For example, in some cultures the end of the story is told first.) Evidence of Learning

  22. EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read. Component 2.2:Understand and apply knowledge of text components to comprehend text Understanding the Reading GLEs WASL Eligible GLE W Grade Level Expectation • Explain ideas or events in sequential order. (Note: Differences in story telling order exist between cultures. For example, in some cultures the end of the story is told first.) • Recognize and explain literary/narrative text written out of sequence (e.g., flashbacks, tales from other cultures). • Explain steps in a process (e.g., problem solving in mathematics, life cycle of a salmon). Evidence of Learning

  23. EALR 1: Component 1.3: Practicing the GLEs

  24. EALR 1: The student understands and uses different skills and strategies to read. Component 1.3: Build vocabulary through wide reading. Practicing the GLEs • Identify and define content area vocabulary critical to the meaning of the text and use that knowledge to interpret the text. • Identify words that have different meanings in different content areas and determine the correct meaning from the context (e.g., as in science or social studies). • Select, from multiple choices, the meaning of words necessary to understand content area text. • Use new vocabulary in oral and written communication.

  25. Misconception ALERT! • Textbooks do NOT = the Curriculum • Curriculum means the written documents describing what students should learn based on the EALRs/GLEs • Textbooks ARE = Tools for Instruction • Instruction consists of pedagogy and instructional materials

  26. Misconception ALERT! • GLEs are NOT: Brand new direction for education reform • GLEs ARE: A new level of specificity for student learning • GLEs are NOT: Teacher’s checklist for teaching • GLEs ARE: Guides for Washington districts, schools and teachers to plan instruction • GLEs are NOT: Lesson plans • GLEs ARE: Support for lesson planning • GLEs are NOT: Student Learning Objectives • GLEs ARE: Learning standards with evidence of student learning

  27. Key Questions for Educators • What do we want students to learn? • GLEs include essential content with the appropriate cognitive demand K-10 for all Washington students. • How will we know they have learned? • The evidence of learning are linked directly to the content and cognitive demand so we can check for proficiency of the learning in several ways. • How will we respond to students who have not learned? • The K-10 continuum allows educators to adjust above and below the grade level to locate skills and strategies necessary for learning at the correct level of difficulty.

  28. Accessing On-line Grade Level Resources • Aligned GLE support can be accessed via: • OSPI website www.k12.wa.us • Curriculum & Instruction home page • Reading On-line Grade Level Resources • This interactive resource provides the following features: • GLE Reports (grade level, grade spans, K-10 GLEs) • Links to GLE glossary • Aligned instructional support • Integration links to other content areas • Support for classroom-based assessments • Links to WASL strands, learning targets, released items

  29. How is CVSD using this information? • Introducing GLEs to staff • Practicing with small groups (e.g. grade levels, content areas) • Reviewing our school and district assessment data • Use Data to Drive our Alignment Activities • Where is improvement needed? • Topical and Deep Alignment • We’re learning more about how to do this • Recognizing evidence of learning in lessons and using them to direct and discuss teacher practice and student learning