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Magisterstudium Wirtschaftsinformatik (Master Program in Information Systems). Gerald Quirchmayr. Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaften und Informatik Institut für Informatik und Wirtschaftsinformatik Liebiggasse 4/3-4, 1010 Wien Tel. +43-1-4277-38431 Fax +43-1-4277-38449

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Magisterstudium Wirtschaftsinformatik (Master Program in Information Systems)


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    1. Magisterstudium Wirtschaftsinformatik (Master Program in Information Systems) Gerald Quirchmayr Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaften und Informatik Institut für Informatik und Wirtschaftsinformatik Liebiggasse 4/3-4, 1010 Wien Tel. +43-1-4277-38431 Fax +43-1-4277-38449 Gerald.Quirchmay@univie.ac.at

    2. Lessons Learned in the First Year • Popularity of courses with students. • Ability to make “last minute“ adjustments is crucial. • Strain on human resources, i.e. the ability to teach a broader set of advanced courses. • Reserve external resources in case courses overflow. • Avoid turning away good students. • Get rid of the poor ones as early as possible. • Research oriented course content. • Don‘t bore advanced students with a traditional lecturing style apporach, get them to actively participate. • Supervision of thesis. • Don‘t overstrain your resources – good supervisors are hard to get and easy to lose.

    3. Free Elective StructuralSciences Business / Economics InformationSystems IT InformationSystems CoreElective CoreElective CoreElective CoreElective Another Look at the Program Structure

    4. How difficult is it to running? • Resourcing. • Stuctural Sciences. • Business / Economics. • Information Systems I and II. • IT. • Free Elective. • Core Electives I to IV. • Thesis. • Appropriate content. • Advantage of having 18 senior staff in the IT area results in attractive offerings. • Substantial numbers of students for courses. • So far no problem. • Program cohernece • Lots of freedom can lead students getting lost.

    5. Strategic Issues • Competition for resources with other programs. • Very succesful IS UG program. • Increasingly succesful CS UG program. • Ph.D. Programs. • In the near future: CS PG programs. • Local, national and international competition? • Effect is not yet known. • Streamlined UG and diverse PG offerings? • Certainly more fun to teach. • Economic viability of high diversity still has to be tested. • Sustainability of electives vs. sustainability of programs. • PG at the expense of UG programs.

    6. Portfolio Management Is this still the right approach for a researech oriented university?

    7. Different Disciplines

    8. Latest Success Stories • From an Institute to a Faculty of Computer Science. • Strucutral sciences. • CS. • IS. • Common understanding,common goals. • Deep in our heart we are all computer scientists with some of us leaning more towards theory and foundations, others leaning more towards applications. • Teaching based on our own research leads to our own strong profile -> excellent electives. • Growing international reputation of teaching in addition to a strong research tradition. • The brand name can in the new environment be used aggrssively to play on the international scene. • Years of international networking in teaching (e.g. Socrates/Erasmus) is now paying off.

    9. Where to from here? • Aim at a stable but not too quick growth to ensure that our staff can cope. • Exclusiveness or quantity? • Internationalisation. • Offerings in English. • Making use of the membership in exclusive clubs (UNICA Network, etc.). • Developing new alliances. • Streamlining of operations. • Technology-based administrative processes with lots of self service modules for staff and students. • Efficently run base modules to free resources for delivering advanced content.

    10. The right setting • New legislation. • Being freed of bureaucratic chains. • EU enlargement. • Being in the centre of Europe again. • Home market is one of the strongest economic areas in the world (Austria, Southern Germany, Switzerland, Northern Italy, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia). • Existing strong alliances with top universities on all levels. • National. • Neighbours. • Europe. • Worldwide. • Strong local alliance and joint delivery of programs. • University of Vienna and TU Vienna.