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Universities involvement of undergraduates in surface and groundwater research projects. Isiorho, S. A. (PhD) (Professor of Geosciences) Indiana University – Purdue University Ft. Wayne (IPFW) Fort Wayne, IN 46805 USA [email protected]

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universities involvement of undergraduates in surface and groundwater research projects
Universities involvement of undergraduates in surface and groundwater research projects

Isiorho, S. A. (PhD)

(Professor of Geosciences)

Indiana University – Purdue University Ft. Wayne (IPFW)

Fort Wayne, IN 46805 USA

[email protected]

Presented at the Int. Conference on Infrastructure Development and the Environment (ICIDEN-ABUJA 2006) Sept. 10-15, 2006

Isiorho's paper Presented GSA May 19, 2005

talk outline
Introduction

Teaching levels

Approach

Incentives & Requirement

Student projects

Highlighted Projects

Summary & Conclusions

Talk Outline
teaching levels tls in ascending order samuelowicz bain 1992
. *Impart information…teacher centered

. **Transmit knowledge…develop competence…skills and conceptual abilities

. ***Facilitate understanding … to understand subject matter … apply

. ****Change students’ conceptions … reality … different knowledge … develop conceptual framework …same level , and

. *****Support student learning…student centered…more at graduate level

TLs can be used to gauge faculty effectiveness in engaging undergraduates…most faculties are at the first two levels (Akerson et al, 2005).

Getting faculty to be at or near the upper level would require that faculty review and change their teaching methods, injecting some research based or service learning into the curriculum.

Teaching Levels (TLs) in ascending order Samuelowicz & Bain (1992)
how do we get there
Service learning is common in the social sciences but rare in the sciences, particularly in the geosciences (Liu et al., 2004). The aim is to foster student interest in earth sciences, enhance university/college outreach, students’ ability to learn and encourage student-centered and team work learning (Liu et. al., 2004).

Service learning usually involves students, the community, linking field and laboratory studies...

How do we get there?
approach
Undergraduates…more than grad students

Geosciences courses….

Hydrogeology, Environmental Geology, Wetlands, Environmental Conservation… usually upper level courses

Modify upper level courses to include some research project component

Approach
incentives requirement
*Required in all upper level courses (30-50% course grade)

Flexibility of topic…selected by students …subject to instructor’s approval

Students are required to present their findings to their peers (using Power Point)

“Optional” students presentation in local, regional or national meetings (if project is deemed appropriate).

Travel fund for outside campus presentation

Incentives & Requirement
some students projects
Time Series Analysis

Effect of Bag type & Size on seepage*

Anthropogenic effect on nearby wetland

Use of Wetland for removal of pollutants

Wetland a topic for interdisciplinary discussions

Pesticides pollution within St. Joseph Watershed

Monitoring and implication for water related problem

Effects of quarry operations on landfill hydrogeology

Relationship between Bowman lake and groundwater

Relationship between Lake Chad and underlying aquifers*

Heavy metal analysis of the LN ditch, Allen County, IN

Some Students’ Projects
lake chad project
Resistivity sounding & profiling

Depth to groundwater measurement

Water chemistry

Remote sensing

Interaction with Earthwatch volunteers

Published in Ground Water 1996 Vol. 34 No. 4, p 819-826

Cited in Bulletin of the Geological Society of America Bulletin, Biogeochemistry, and J. of Environmental Management.

Lake Chad Project
effect of bag type and size on seepage
Lab experimentation using different seepage meter sizes and bag types

No significance between bag types

Would recommend using large seepage meters to minimize variations

Published in Ground Water vol. 37(3) p 411-413,1999

Cited by 7 authors in 4 Int. journals…J. Hydrology, Groundwater, Water resources & Limnology & Oceanography

Effect of Bag type and Size on Seepage

http://www.geo.sunysb.edu/lig/Conferences/Abstracts99/O'Rourke/O'Rourke_MS.htm

benefits
Students

Learn methods, use of instruments, develop ideas, design, collect, analyze, report, & get published…

Uni-Maid students…network

Faculty gets rewarded

Support student learning ...the highest TL

Benefits
summary conclusions
Make research project a part of upper level courses… leads to support of student learning

Involving undergraduates in research projects introduces them to scientific methods, real world learning, provides teaching materials for instructors, and getting published too.

Undergraduates can help to solve environmental problems when given the opportunity

It’s a win-win situation for students, instructors, and society

Summary & Conclusions
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