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Conducting a Risk & Vulnerability Assessment. Ohio Summit on Campus Safety and Security August 2011. Agenda. Introductions Definitions Why an Assessment Methodology. Definitions. Vulnerability : the state of being exposed or susceptible to harm or injury

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Conducting a Risk & Vulnerability Assessment


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Conducting a Risk & Vulnerability Assessment Ohio Summit on Campus Safety and Security August 2011

    2. Agenda • Introductions • Definitions • Why an Assessment • Methodology

    3. Definitions • Vulnerability: the state of being exposed or susceptible to harm or injury • Vulnerability Assessment: ongoing, critical evaluation • identify potential risks and areas of weakness that could have adverse consequences for institutions and their systems

    4. Definitions • Hazards Assessment: focuses on general hazards to determine what hazards you might be prone to. • Risk Analysis: focuses on risk levels and consequences

    5. Why An Assessment? • The Campus Landscape • Legal Obligations • Case Law • Post Incident Reports • Most notably those from institutions, state and Federal gov’t, & professional associations

    6. Campus Safety Landscape • High-risk drinking • Illegal and prescription drug use and abuse • Violence • VAW • Criminal intrusions, including rampage shooters • Natural disasters • Fire and life safety • Mental illness and suicide • Food poisoning, food-borne illness, pandemic • Terrorist threats

    7. Campus Safety Landscape

    8. Legal Obligations • You own/control premises • You operate programs, on and off campus • You have “special relationships” with students • Laws and regulations

    9. Mullins v. Pine Manor College • 1983 case involving an assault on a female student on campus by a non-student assailant • Massachusetts Supreme Court found the college liable for negligent security. "Parents, students and the general community still have a reasonable expectation, fostered in part by the colleges themselves, that reasonable care will be exercised to protect resident students from foreseeable harm."

    10. After-Action Reports • More than 20 state reports following Virginia Tech tragedy • VT Report, State of Florida, California • Report to the President • Several professional association reports • Notably National Association of Attorneys General; IACLEA Blueprint

    11. After-Action Reports • All recommend that institutions conduct a risk or vulnerability, assessment: “…each college and university (should) conduct a critical infrastructure assessment using trained security specialists.” (Florida Gubernatorial Task Force for University Campus Safety)

    12. OrganizationalFramework FEMA’s 4 Phases of Emergency Management 

    13. Methodology

    14. Environmental Scan • Internal assessment • ID critical infrastructure and other facilities • ID perceived threats and vulnerabilities from key constituents (remember Law of Diminishing Returns) • Catalog findings (threats to people, property, natural acts, terrorism)

    15. Environmental Scan • External assessment • Crime on/around campus – reported and unreported • Perception of safety/fear of crime • Crime in local area • AOD issues • VAW

    16. Physical Security Systems • Review campus physical security systems • Perimeter – fence or other boundary, cameras • Building Perimeter - access control, cameras • Interior – intrusion alarms, panic/duress alarms, cameras

    17. Policies, Procedures & Education • Human Resources • Residential Living • Workplace Violence • Training and Awareness • Violence Against Women Prevention Policies • Drugs, Alcohol and Weapons • Access Control • EAP

    18. Response Capacity • Campus public safety entity • All Hazards Emergency Management – Concept of Operations • Evacuation • Emergency Notifications & Timely Warnings • MOU/MOA

    19. Risk=VCP • Vulnerability • Consequence • Probability • Scale of 1 to 3 1 27

    20. Justifying the Assessment • ROI • Avoiding Hyperbole • Advocating for an “All Hazards” approach

    21. Exercise • Quick roundtable of 3 most critical risks • Reach consensus, based on formula • Brainstorm actions

    22. Potential Critical Incidents Bomb (explosive device) Bomb Threat Boycott Breach of Confidentiality Breaking and Entering Bullying Burglary Cave In Chemical Hazard or Spill Child Abduction Civil Disturbance Cyber-Hacking Demonstration • Active Shooter • Accident or Injury • Aircraft Crash • Alcohol Abuse or Misuse • Animal Attack • Animal Escape • Armed Robbery • Arrest • Arrest Warrant • Arson • Assault • Auto Theft • Biological Hazard

    23. The 4 C’s of Success • Collaborate • Communicate • Coordinate • Capitalize

    24. Contact www.Margolis-Healy.com shealy@margolis-healy.com gmargolis@margolis-healy.com 1-866-817-5817