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Talent Development Secondary Business Plan (FY2015-FY2018). March 2014. 6_89. Contents. The high school dropout crisis & introduction to TDS TDS’s strategic priorities and initiatives Implications for the organization and funding model Implementation milestones and risks. 3_85.

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contents

6_89

Contents
  • The high school dropout crisis & introduction to TDS
  • TDS’s strategic priorities and initiatives
  • Implications for the organization and funding model
  • Implementation milestones and risks
high school success is critical to college and career readiness but too many youth fail to graduate

3_85

High school success is critical to college and career readiness, but too many youth fail to graduate
  • Youth need postsecondary education to access employment opportunities that lead to productive, stable adult lives
    • College is increasingly critical as the proportion of jobs requiring at least some college has increased from 28% to 59% from 1973 to 2007
    • Individuals without college experience will typically earn less than the $34K required to pay for basic household expenses for a two-parent, two-child household
  • High school graduation is a critical step towards college and career readiness; dropping out leads to risky behaviors and poor outcomes for youth
    • Over their lifetimes, individuals who fail to complete high school will earn nearly $1M less than college graduates
    • Dropouts are more likely to be involved with the justice system and teen pregnancy
    • The Centers for Disease Control has identified dropping out of school as the major social determinant of health and a significant public health issue
  • While the US high school graduation rate has improved, 20% of students still failed to graduate in 2012, and significant disparities exist—for example:
    • In 2009, students from the lowest 20% of all family incomes were five times more likely to drop out of high school than students from the highest 20% of family incomes
    • 25% of African American students attend high schools with graduation rates of <60%

Source: “Help Wanted: Protections of Job and Education Requirements Through 2018” Center on Education and the Workforce; “Pathways to Prosperity,” Harvard Graduate School of Education, February 2011; “The Basic Economic Security Tables for the United States,” A Project of Wider Opportunities For Women’s Family Economic Security Program, 2010; Carnevale, Anthony ; Rose, Stephen; Cheah, Ban. “The College Payoff: Education, Occupations, Lifetime Earnings,” Center on Education and the Workforce (August 2011); Freudenberg N. and Ruglis J. “Reframing school dropout as a public health issue.” Preventing Chronic Disease (2007); Sum, Andrew; Khatiwada, Ishwar; and McLaughlin, Joseph, "The consequences of dropping out of high school: joblessness and jailing for high school dropouts and the high cost for taxpayers" (2009). Center for Labor Market Studies Publications; National Center for Education Statistics.

fortunately we know which schools and which students need help and we know how to help them succeed

8_85 18_85

Fortunately, we know which schools and which students need help, and we know how to help them succeed

The problem is understood…

…and an evidence-based solution is emerging

  • MDRC’s 2005 study of 20 9th grade cohorts in Philadelphia found that TDS produced substantial gains in:
    • Increase in attendance (5.1%)
    • More course credits earned (algebra 24.5%, basic curriculum 8.2%)
    • Higher promotion rates (8% to 10th grade; 6.5% to 11th grade)
  • Currently, TDS is nearing the completion of its i3 study, the results of which are expected to provide further evidence of the model’s effectiveness
  • Extending the i3 study until all cohorts have graduated HS is critical to proving TDS’s widespread impact
  • We know which high schools generate the most dropouts
    • Of the ~13,700 US high schools, ~1,400 produce nearly half of the ~800K students who dropout each year
  • Within those schools, we can identify students—as early as sixth grade—who have very high odds of not succeeding without effective interventions
    • Early warning indicators (Attendance, Behavior, Course performance in math and ELA) provide nearly real-time data to predict student success

Source: James J. Kemple, Corinne Herlihy, and Thomas J. Smith, Making Progress Toward Graduation: Evidence from the Talent Development High School Model(MDRC, 2005).

slide5

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18 years ago, TDS began its journey to develop evidence-based practices to address the dropout crisis

Phase I

1995

Phase II

2005

Phase III

2007

slide6

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The resulting TDS model has four ‘pillars’ that provides schools with the supports they need to succeed

TDS’s intervention is specifically designed as a synthesis of the best evidence on whole school reform strategies, targeting the nation’s lowest performing schools

tds and diplomas now have been widely recognized as a premiere school improvement program

5_85 8_84

TDS and Diplomas Now have been widely recognized as a premiere school improvement program

Select Awards

Select Press coverage

  • One of 49 winners selected from ~1,700applicants of the Investing in Innovation award, the flagship innovation grant program from the US Department of Education
  • 2014 finalist in CLASSY award for Quality of Education and Completion, which recognize champions of social progress
  • Aki Kurose Middle School (Seattle) Diplomas Now team won a Special Recognition Award in the inaugural Road Map Project Awards Program, a community effort aimed at improving education to drive dramatic improvement in student achievement from cradle to college and career in South King County and South Seattle
  • “Results of the program, piloted here last year, were so impressive that the program has spread to four more cities: Chicago, Los Angeles, New Orleans and San Antonio. The expansion is being funded with a three-year, $5 million grant from the PepsiCo Foundation.”
  • – USA Today, 5/20/10
  • “Chicago Talent Development Charter High School is not like most places. Centered in one of Chicago's toughest neighborhoods, it's a new approach to an old problem…already it's made a difference. At Chicago Talent, average daily attendance is at 90 percent−that's eight points above [other] Chicago public schools. And so far, 92 percent of 9th graders are on track to graduate−28 points above the district average.”
  • – CBS Evening News, 11/30/10
slide8

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Diplomas Now is a critical partnership that is the most robust iteration yet of TDS’s school improvement model

Whole School Reform

  • Pillar 1: Teacher teaming and professional development
  • Pillar 2: Research-based curriculum and coaching
  • Pillar 3: Early Warning Indicator system
  • Pillar 4: School climate

Targeted Support & Whole School Prevention

  • Addressing need for greater scale (more adults)
  • Small group and one-on-one mentoring
  • Monitoring/coaching attendance and behavior
  • After school/extended learning, instructional support
  • Addressing need for greater intensity (for 5-10% of students who don’t respond to other supports)
  • Case management, referrals to partners
  • Small group and individualized counseling

Integrated Student Supports

Note: TDS is pursuing an MOU to formalize Diplomas Now partnership.

slide9

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TDS is now positioned to increase its impact and influence due to its unique assets

Impact

Influence

  • As the first and only randomized control trial of whole school reform plus enhanced student supports guided by an early warning system, the i3 study and its extension will give unparalleled evidence of effectiveness
  • A strong university-based research and development engine keeps TDS current and enables it to drive the evidence base
  • Deep, integrated partnerships with City Year and Communities in Schools (who have their own national infrastructures), help establish and maintain strong local relations
  • TDS’s national footprint and experienced field staff means TDS has the infrastructure to scale rapidly
  • TD’s relationship with the The Everyone Graduates Center and alliances with key organizations helps it create the field :
    • Alliance for Excellence in Education,
    • America’s Promise Alliance
    • Results for America
    • United Way
  • JHU School of Education’s growing online education presence will enable TDS to provide schools and districts with access to certifications and human capital development pipelines
slide10

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Today, TDS is poised to change the education system’s approach to helping disadvantaged youth succeed

Deepen Impact

Improve Economics

Extend Influence

contents1

6_89

Contents
  • The high school dropout crisis & introduction to TDS
  • TDS’s strategic priorities and initiatives
  • Implications for the organization and funding model
  • Implementation milestones and risks
work with bridgespan
Work with Bridgespan

State and federal policies

Work Group:

What can we do already, what training do we need to do, are there new positions we need?

Internal finances

Potential funding streams

Customer Interviews

four strategic priorities will help tds achieve these goals

4_85

Four strategic priorities will help TDS achieve these goals
  • Establish local operating teams in priority communities, strengthening TDS’s local relationships and influence
  • Codify an expanded portfolio of supports that achieve impact in schools, and allow TDS to sustain a long-term presence in priority communities
  • Invest in improving professional development supports and organizational capacityto support TDS’s new strategy
  • Build policy influence capacity and engage in field-building activities inpriority statesto scale whole school reform in those states and across the nation

1

2

3

4

tds design week questions to help us meet strategic priorities
TDS Design Week Questions to Help Us Meet Strategic Priorities

Dedicated week for 30 members of TDS leadership and staff to work through key questions

Freedom to Re-think TDS processes based on insights from the Field

Identify key areas or needs for work plans

Design prototypes for moving the work forward

slide15

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Establishing local teams will deepen impact, increase local revenue, and sustain TDS’s local influence
  • Local teams will increase impact:
  • Instructional Facilitators (IFs) will be able to spend more time in each school, instead of traveling, to accelerate school-level impact and long-term capacity-building
    • Based locally, IFs can increase time spent in-person with teachers/coaches (from 20 to up to 40 days per year)
  • Principals value School Transformation Facilitators (STFs) and IFs with deep local knowledge because it leads to more effective coaching and instruction for teachers
    • “I want local people—flying in does not work—you have to understand our culture.”
  • Local teams will be set up in key cities that have demand for TDS/DN at scale post-i3
  • Local teams will give TDS the flexibility to respond to increased demand in priority cities as a result of the i3 study
    • Local teams will increase economic sustainability:
  • Moving to local teams will lower cost per student (from $280 to <$200) over time as teams serve more schools per team and STF costs are shifted to schools
  • Local teams enable the long-term relationships necessary for increasing financial support fromschools, districts, and local corporations and philanthropy
  • The local team approach will give TDS greater operational stability, and flexibility to scale up
    • More local champions will help mitigate the challenges created by turnover in school and district leadership
    • Local teams will increase influence:
  • Effective policy engagement requires long-term relationships with districts, state, and local policymakers
    • Local teams will help TDS create stronger, more persistent relationships in communities as they participate more fully in local forums, coalitions, and events.

Source: Bridgespan interviews with policy experts and school and district leaders.

slide16

1

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Initiatives: TDS will establish teams in priority communities, changing key roles and responsibilities

I

  • Select specific communities within priority states where TDS will place local operating teams
  • Createthe local team structure, roles and responsibilities,including:
    • Elevating and expanding the Field Manager role to a local Executive Director role
      • Create a set FM on-boarding process
      • Create a process and template for professional growth plans to support
      • Develop role of FM around policy impact
      • Identify clear ways for FM communication with management team
    • Creating new Deputy Director and School and Student Support Services (S4) Program Lead rolesto support Executive Directors
    • Defining roles for key decisions related to local communities
    • Setting local revenue goals for local teams, Regional Directors and the national office
  • Developtransition plans for (a) converting TDS’s current sites in priority states to local teams, and b) current TDS sites that are not in priority states; and entry plans for new priority communities
    • Phase in the local team model, including new roles, staff assignments, and hiring as needed

II

III

Note: Implementation of the local operating teams will require TDS to be able to hire part-time IFs as needed.

slide17

1

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Initiatives: TDS will establish teams in priority communities, changing key roles and responsibilities

IV

  • Create national field team of Instructional Facilitators (IFs) to (a) serve strategically important schools outside of priority communities, (b) provide surge capacity for local teams
    • Develop mid-level support for finance, resource development, communication, and family engagement
  • Codify the TDS message on the “dig in, push out” strategy to achieve impact, for both internal and external audiences, including:
    • Using results of the i3 study to elevate the TDS and Diplomas Now
    • Establishing appropriate messaging for school districts and Diplomas Now partners (where applicable) in priority communities for TDS’s long-term presence and work with individual schools

V

Note: Implementation of the local operating teams will require TDS to be able to hire part-time IFs as needed.

over 3 4 years tds will establish local teams in priority states tds is currently in all but one tn

1

3_84 159_84 158_84 22_84 180_85 24_84

Over 3-4 years, TDS will establish local teams in priority states; TDS is currently in all but one (TN)

Current TDS presence

Actively pursue: 7

Monitor for opportunity: 9

Maintain current presence* (if applicable): 10

AK

Maintain current presence* (if applicable),

but did not meet original filter for need: 25

WA*

ME

ND

MT

OR*

MN

NH

VT

NY

MA

ID

WI

CT

SD

MI

RI

WY

HI

PA

NJ

IA

NV

DE

NE

OH

  • Ranking criteria used:
  • High need
  • City Year presence
  • State has EWI
  • Innovation zones
  • National political influence
  • Governor appoints CSSO/SEB
  • Single party control of gov’t
  • State/mayoral control
  • State expenditure per pupil
  • Long-term funding change
  • Short-term funding change

IL

UT

MD

WV

CA

IN

VA

CO

KS

DC

KY

MO

NC

OK

TN

SC

AZ

AR

NM

GA

AL

MS

TX

LA*

FL

Note: *OR and WA have low graduation rates and high need based on measures other than promoting power. LA did not meet the original need filter for one district, but two neighboring districts (EBR and Recovery) have high combined need and may present future opportunities. Does not include Guam.

slide19

1

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The TDS model transforms schools via interactions with a team of experts who each play a distinct role

Position

Role description

local teams will ideally serve 4 to 6 full model schools

1

48_84 60_84

Local teams will ideally serve 4 to 6 full model schools*

COO’s

Division Managers (3)

Regional Directors (3-4)

Local team serving 6 full model schools

Local team serving 4 full model schools

Executive Director

Executive Director

Math IF (1)

S4 Program Lead (1)

S4 IF (1)

Deputy Director

Math IF (1.5)

STFs*

(6)

ELA IF (1)

STFs*

(4)

ELA IF (1.5)

Note: Four to six full model schools is the target size of each local community but private funders may fully fund a local team for any number of schools. If necessary, local teams can substitute a set of standalone supports to fill the slot of a full model school and utilize capacity

slide21

1

60_84 70_84 26_85 88_85

Clarifying reporting lines for IFs will markedly improve local team flexibility while preserving quality control

Current model:

New model:

Division Managers (3)

Division Managers (3)

Local presence

Local team

Executive Director

Field Manager

STFs

STFs

IFs

IFs

  • Field Manager had little latitude to increase or decrease team size based on local demand;
  • Executive Director has full authority to manage utilization of their team
  • Division Managers maintains critical quality controlrole over quality and direction of in-school work
developing the s upport structure

1

Developing the support structure

New staff on-boarding process

Professional growth plans

Training opportunities

Transition plans for new local sites

Operations plans from intake to sustainability

National Support for finance, development, training, program design, and research

Local Team

slide23

2

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An expanded portfolio of school supports will strengthen local relationships and economic sustainability
  • An expanded portfolio will increase impact:
  • TDS can reach a greater number of schools within a district with a larger portfolio of supports
    • Customers find the TDS full model/Diplomas Now very attractive; however there is also customer demand for EWIand Freshman Seminar/Mastering the Middle Grades curriculum as standalone supports:
      • “EWI is the most valuable for us—both the mechanism and the conversation—we’ve recommended it be implemented at all [our] schools, regardless of TDS being there.’”
      • “We lose a lot of students in 9th grade, Freshman Seminar would help that transition.”
    • TDS can create these standalone school supports with relatively low investment as they are already components of the full model
    • An expanded portfolio will increase economic sustainability:
  • Standalone school supports based on pillars of the TDS full model can help a local team deepen and sustain relationships with its district(s)and create a low-cost point of entry for new schools/districts who cannot yet afford the full model
    • Serving more schools allows TDS to extend its district relationships
    • Principals’ discretionary budget maximum is $50K-$100K on average, which can pay for standalone supports
  • In the local operating team environment, economic sustainability and team stability requires high utilization of team members; supporting standalone supports gives local teams greater utilization flexibility

Note: See appendix for guidelines for when providing a standalone support is appropriate, capacity utilization assumptions and pricing guidelines.

Source: Bridgespan customer interviews; TDS financials and Bridgespan analysis.

initiatives tds will strengthen and expand its portfolio of school supports

2

11_85

Initiatives: TDS will strengthen and expand its portfolio of school supports
  • Further develop EWI, Freshman Seminar/Mastering the Middle Grades, as standalone school supports in TDS’s portfolio
    • Develop an EWS request questionnaire and on-site diagnostic tool
    • Create a one pager for EWS support with EWS support options
    • Create a school survey for EWS practices
    • Develop a toolbox of ideas for EWS support
  • Continue R&D work for Math/ELA curriculum to prepare for schools’ evolving Common Core needs; explore development of special education, social-emotional learning, and English Language Learner supports
  • Continue annual review and refinement process of the existing TDS full model to improve and incorporate new evidence as necessary
  • Codify guidelines and fidelity screens for implementation of TDS’s portfolio to ensure positive results and avoid cannibalization

I

II

III

IV

Note: See appendix for additional detail on decision roles, criteria and guidelines.

initiatives tds will strengthen and expand its portfolio of school supports1

2

11_85

Initiatives: TDS will strengthen and expand its portfolio of school supports

V

  • Improve consistency and effectiveness of TDS’s marketing and communications (e.g., define key messages for different audiences, create collateral, train staff)
    • Create an internal communications plan
    • Develop communications/training points
    • Create model messages for different audiences
    • Create guidelines for local communications plan
    • Look for places to capitalize on JHU brand

Note: See appendix for additional detail on decision roles, criteria and guidelines.

a strategic portfolio of school supports

2

10_85

A strategic portfolio of school supports
  • An strategic portfolio will increase impact:
  • TDS can reach a greater number of schools within a district with a larger portfolio of supports
    • An strategic portfolio will increase economic sustainability:
  • Standalone school supports can help a local team deepen and sustain relationships with its district(s)and create a point of entry for new schools/districts
range of supports for ews only
Range of supports for EWS only

Light Touch

  • Process
  • Intake & Diagnostic
  • Contract
  • Planning
  • Implementation
  • Technical Assistance (TA) Days
  • Data tool
  • Level of Need
  • Size and number of Initiatives

Medium Touch

  • Technical Assistance (TA) Days
  • Data tool
  • School Transformation Facilitator (STF)

Heavy Touch

  • Technical Assistance (TA) Days
  • School Transformation Facilitator
  • Field Manager
customer feedback shows the greatest preference for ewi among the standalone school supports tested

2

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Customer feedback shows the greatest preference for EWI among the standalone school supports tested
  • “Diplomas Now is valuable because at its center are the students and their outcomes—it addresses the school, community and home environments.”
  • “If you can find a way to build EWI and tiered interventions inside the existing schedule framework, you can solve a huge problem across the country.”
  • “The TDS full model is so promising (even though it’s expensive) because it helps people see the interconnected nature of curriculum, schedule, tracking data, and after school supports.”
  • “[Support] for the non-cognitive skills, like Freshman Seminar, [is really important]…most schools struggle with creating those kinds of modules.”
  • “My biggest concern about the Math/ELA curriculumis that schools are focused on curriculum that supports the Common Core.”
  • “I’m not interested in the Math/ELA curriculum because our district is already advanced in that area.”

n = 20

This chart shows customers’ overall relative preference between, and range within, each of the supports by showing the minimum, maximum and average percent deviations for each support, across all respondents.

Percent deviation is the percentage by which an individual respondent’s score for an individual support is higher or lower than that respondent’s average score for all supports.

Source: Bridgespan interviews with funders, school principals and district leaders. The “Small Learning Communities and Teacher Teams” product was tested only in an initial subset of interviews and so is not included here.

tds s new portfolio will include three standalone supports in addition to its full model

2

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TDS’s new portfolio will include three standalone supports, in addition to its full model

Full DN/TDS Model

EWI

Freshman Seminar/Mastering the Middle Grades

Math/ELA Curriculum

Note: TDS will also develop an “EWI diagnostic” as a relationship-building tool with districts. It may also develop an “EWI light” for customers outside of priority communities. School support descriptions to be further refined during TDS design week. *In full model and EWI schools, the schools may or may not be the direct employers of STFs, which will affect TDS’s price. Price ranges may vary widely and depend on composition of the local team. Contribution to national costs per school assumes that TDS operates in 72 full model schools by FY2018 and recovers 50% of national infrastructure costs through school fees; TDS’s fiscal year begins on July 1. Prices do not include the separate costs of Diplomas Now partners. See appendix for pricing guidelines.

slide30

2

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TDS’s portfolio enables support to be both comprehensive and limited need schools throughout their relationship

New Entry

Core implementation

Sustained relationship

slide31

3

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Investmentin professional development and organization capacity are critical to the success of local teams
  • Investment in professional development and organization capacity will increase impact:
  • Local EDs are the linchpin position of the new strategy; TDS national must develop new skills in its Field Managers to take on this new role and achieve strong programmatic results
    • Local leaders are the face of TDS to principals, districts, and partners, and have the greatest influence on high quality implementation in schools
  • Improved professional development and training will result in higher impact in schools
    • TDS’s impact is a direct result of the skills and expertise of the STFs and IFs that interact with principals, coaches, and teachers in a school; customer satisfaction is highly correlated with STF/IF talent in the school
    • Professional development andinternal communication were identified as areas in need of improvement by the organizational diagnostic survey and staff interviews
    • Investment in professional development and organization capacity will increase economic sustainability:
  • The new ED will be the face of TDS to schools/districts and local philanthropies; informing, negotiating, and fundraising all depend on the ED (supported by Regional Directors)
  • Utilization is a key factor of the economic sustainability of a local team; EDs will need support in developing local budgeting, forecasting, and financial management skills to monitor and manage local utilization
  • Investment in professional development and organization capacity will extend influence:
  • The new EDs will play a lead role in local policy discussions, as well as participate in state-level policy activities—another shift from the responsibilities of the Field Manager role

Source: Bridgespan interviews with TDS staff; Bridgespan organization diagnostic.

initiatives tds will invest in professional development and improved organizational practices

3

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Initiatives: TDS will invest in professional development and improved organizational practices
  • Create a distinct Design, Development & Training Team to focus on facilitation and content training, development of school supports, quality control and standards setting; add resources to run professional development
    • Develop multi-year sequences for internal and external training
  • Increase skill set of existing staff:
    • Support Field Managers’ transition to ED role by providing professional development supports, including high quality on-the-job coaching, general management (e.g., finance, managing/coaching others) and external relations skill sets (e.g., resource development)
    • Improve STFs leadership skills in leading school and team efforts
    • Increase external relations skills of Regional Directors to strengthen their contributions to fundraising, community and customer relations, and policy goals
    • Expand IF repertoire across multiple skill sets, including STF leadership skills, S4 Program Lead position and cross-training Math and ELA Instructional Facilitators to deliver EWI and FS/MMG
      • Create a year-long professional growth plan that includes quarterly professional growth plans
      • Develop content and plans for cross-training for 2014-2015
      • Develop national resource bank for internal support and pipeline
  • Make new hires:
    • Finance Manager to help implement enhanced financial controls and processes
    • Development Director to secure resources proactively and Forecasting Analyst to support local team finance and utilization information needs
    • Additional RDs to support EDs
      • Develop a new staff on-boarding process
      • Examine the use of the casual model

I

II

III

  • Note: Leadership development research shows that adults learn best with a combination of on-the-job experience supported by coaching and training in an ~70/20/10 ratio.
initiatives tds will invest in professional development and improved organizational practices1

3

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Initiatives: TDS will invest in professional development and improved organizational practices
  • Develop and implement an ongoing internal communications plan to ensure a clear common vision of TDS’s goals and sharing of information within the organization*
  • Codify decision roles for the ~5-7 most important decisions (e.g., hiring local teams)
  • Create management dashboard of key indicators (e.g., community-level team utilization and financial performance) for monthly review by the executive team
  • Improve operational practices from school interest, to planning, implementation and sustainability
    • Create a database of schools from interest to sustainability
    • Create a timeline from intake to contract with intake interest form
    • Develop a needs assessment/school diagnostic
    • Create planning guiding documents, templates, calendars, and samples for different TDS planning options (3, 6, 12 months)
    • Identify decision points and person for moving to develop a contract

IV

V

VI

VII

  • Note: Leadership development research shows that adults learn best with a combination of on-the-job experience supported by coaching and training in an ~70/20/10 ratio. See appendix for additional detail on decision roles.
tds organizational structure july 1 2014 january 1 2015

3

TDS organizational structure:July 1, 2014 – January 1, 2015

Co -

Directors

New position

Existing Position

JHU Research and EGC

CEO

Diplomas Now Director & Dep. Director

Materials Director & Team

Finance Manager

COO Site Development

Develop’t Director

COO School Supports

Policy Director

Comm. Director Team

Fore-casting Analyst

Regional Director

Regional Director

Regional Director

Launch Manager

Division Manager

(3)*

Training Director

Local Field

Operations (interim)

STFs

Local Team (FM, STFs)

Local Team (FM, STFs)

Local Team (FM, STFs)

S4 IFs**

Math IFs**

Local Team (FM, STFs)

ELA IFs**

“Pre-Local” FMs

“Pre-Local” FMs

“Pre-Local” FMs

“Pre-Local” STFs

“Pre-Local” STFs

“Pre-Local” STFs

Note: **IFs will continue to report to Division Managers until the local team FMs become EDs and have the necessary supports in place (e.g., Deputy Directors or S4 Program Leads), which will happen on a case-by-case basis.

for tds s plan to succeed several groups will require support to develop new and expanded skills

3

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For TDS’s plan to succeed, several groups will require support to develop new and expanded skills
slide37

4

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Of the five potential levers for building and influencing the field, TDS will focus on three new activities

Current

Future

TDS

EGC*

Potential partner(s)

TDS focus:

Being a voice at the table for policy debates

Policy voice

APA

Providing curriculum and training to schools, districts, and/or future principals and district/state administrators to implement the model

Building capacity of current and future leaders

JHU School of Education

Setting the “guidelines and goal posts” that should define the field of evidence-based whole school reform

Will seek strategically

Setting standards/ guidelines for practice

United Way

APA

AEE

AA/RFA

CE*

Convening other stakeholders, building common identity around whole school reform, organizing grassroots and/or grasstops campaigns

Building awareness and alignment in the field

Advancing the frontier of knowledge on whole school reform, building models, and conducting original research that helps policymakers focus on solutions

Disseminating knowledge to the field

Note: *EGC (Everyone Graduates Center), APA (America’s Promise Alliance), AEE (Alliance for Excellent Education), AA/RFA (America Achieves/Results for America), Civic Enterprises (CE)

contents2

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Contents
  • The high school dropout crisis & introduction to TDS
  • TDS’s strategic priorities and initiatives
  • Implications for the organization and funding model
  • Implementation milestones and risks
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TDS will build up to 72 full model schools in active implementation by FY2018, and shift to priority communities

I3 results released

I3 results released

112

94

72**

70

64

56

50

Active full model implementation schools

48

i3

i3

i3

Note: *Number of students served is based on US average of ~1,000 students per high school, number of DN schools based on current proportion of 80% of schools in DN implementation; both include active implementation and sustained schools. **72 active full model implementation schools is the minimum base for TDS’s operational efficiency, and can be built on without increasing national infrastructure; adding 30 more active full model schools would generate additional internal operating capital. **See appendix for details on sustained model schools.

over the next four years tds will move from national grants to a larger percentage of local revenue
Over the next four years, TDS will move from national grants to a larger percentage of local revenue

Cost of extending i3 study

Note: Revenue does not include strategically limited supports such as district-level training, EWI light, etc.

Source: JHU Finance department, Bridgespan analysis.

organizational capacity building includes funding for new investments and transition costs

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Organizational capacity building includes funding for new investments and transition costs

New investments

  • Development of new Freshman Seminar/Mastering the Middle Grades curricula to include brain science and behavioral economics
  • Marketing consultant and collateral development to enhance external messaging and increase brand awareness
  • Development of new two year teacher/administrator professional development module to be delivered as part of TDS’s agenda for building the field’s capacity for whole school reform
  • First 24 months of external trainers and staff travel associated with new skill development (e.g., external relations for RDs and EDs, management and professional coach for EDs and executive team; program management for EDs, Deputy Directors, and S4 Program Leads; cross-training in EWS and FS/MMG for Math/ELA IFs)

Transition costs

  • Relocation costs associated with moving to local teams
  • First 18 months of local offices and first six months of new hires/transitioning positions (e.g., Training Director, EDs, Deputy Directors, IFs, RDs)
  • Staff time for marketing training
  • Senior resource to codify EWI as standalone support and criteria for responding to future opportunities
  • First 18 months of Policy Director, Finance Manager, Development Director, and Forecasting Analyst; associated search and relocation costs
  • First 18 months of delivery of teacher/administrator professional development and district-wide capacity trainings
  • First 24 months of staff time associated with new skill development (e.g., external relations for RDs and EDs; management for EDs and executive team; program management for EDs, Deputy Directors and S4 Program Leads; cross-training in EWS and FS/MMG for Math/ELA IFs)
  • Senior staff time to implement strategic plan for 24 months
tds will contribute its own resources to executing the four strategic initiatives as well

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TDS will contribute its own resources to executing the four strategic initiatives as well
  • New field offices after 18 months
  • New local team hires/staff transitions (including Training Director, Deputy Directors, IFs, and RDs) after first six months
  • DD&T team allocation for redesigning Math and ELA curricula in line with Common Core, developing modules for ELL and Special Education students
  • JHU assistance in digitizing select materials
  • Policy team allocation to work with CSOS and the Everyone Graduates Center to set and disseminate guidelines and standards for the field of whole school reform
  • Policy Director, Finance Manager, Development Director and Forecasting Analyst salaries after initial 18 months as new hires
  • Delivering teacher/administrator professional development after initial 18 months
  • Delivering district-wide trainings after initial 18 months
  • External trainers, staff time, and staff travel associated with new skill development after 24 months (e.g., external relations for RDs and EDs; management for EDs and executive team; program management for EDs and Deputy Directors; cross-training in EWI and FS/MMG for new Math/ELA IFs)
contents3

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Contents
  • The high school dropout crisis & introduction to TDS
  • TDS’s strategic priorities and initiatives
  • Implications for the organization and funding model
  • Implementation milestones and risks
implementation timeline establishing local teams
Implementation timeline: Establishing local teams

Ongoing

Ongoing, as EDs and communities are ready

Note: TDS will develop a more detailed implementation timeline and may adjust the timing/sequencing of individual activities as needed.

implementation timeline expanding tds s portfolio of school supports
Implementation timeline: Expanding TDS’s portfolio of school supports

Ongoing, as needed

Note: TDS will develop a more detailed implementation timeline and may adjust the timing/sequencing of individual activities as needed. Ongoing curriculum R&D will primarily focus on refining Math/ELA to support the Common Core, and exploring potential supports related to special education, English Language Learners and social-emotional learning.

implementation timeline invest in professional development and organizational capacity
Implementation timeline: Invest in professional development and organizational capacity

Ongoing

Ongoing, as ready

Ongoing

Note: TDS will develop a more detailed implementation timeline and may adjust the timing/sequencing of individual activities as needed.

implementation timeline build policy capacity and engage in field building activities
Implementation timeline: Build policy capacity and engage in field-building activities

Note: TDS will develop a more detailed implementation timeline and may adjust the timing/sequencing of individual activities as needed.