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Introducing W ords. Milford Public School August 15, 2011. Why ? What? How?. ADULT. Just for fun!. A person who has stopped growing at both ends and is now growing in the middle. . WRINKLES. Just for fun!. Something other people have similar to my character lines. DUST.

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introducing w ords

Introducing Words

Milford Public School

August 15, 2011

Why? What? How?

adult

ADULT

Just for fun!

A person who has stopped growing at both ends and is now growing in the middle.

wrinkles

WRINKLES

Just for fun!

Something other people have similar to my character lines.

slide4

DUST

Just for fun!

Mud with the juice squeezed out.

slide5

YAWN

Just for fun!

An honest opinion openly expressed.

handkerchief

HANDKERCHIEF

Just for fun!

Cold storage.

a secret

a SECRET

Just for fun!

Something you tell one person at a time.

tomorrow

TOMORROW

Just for fun!

One of the greatest labor saving devices of today.

why should i teach some words explicitly

Why should I teach some words explicitly?

Explicit –

~ I do it, we do it, you do it

~ Explain, Model, Prompt, Practice

facets of purposeful vocabulary instruction
Facets ofPurposeful Vocabulary Instruction
  • Provide rich and varied language experiences
    • discussion, focused attention on words, being read to, wide and frequent reading
  • Teach word-learning strategies
    • using context, using morphology (word parts), using a dictionary
  • Foster word consciousness
    • awareness, interest in words and their meanings, understanding of communicative power of language
  • Teach individual words

(Graves, The Vocabulary Handbook, 2006, p. 5)

effective vocabulary instruction
Effective Vocabulary Instruction
  • Explicit instruction of specific words is effective.
  • Vocabulary instruction should focus on critical words.
  • Effective vocabulary instruction does not rely on definitions.
  • Teaching word parts enhances understanding.
  • Different types of words require different types of instruction.
  • Active engagement improves learning.
  • Repeated exposure is essential.
how might i introduce different kinds of terms most effectively

How might I introduce different kinds of terms most effectively?

~ 3 essentials

~ ways to engage with words

how might i introduce different kinds of terms most effectively1

How might I introduce different kinds of terms most effectively?

~ 3 essentials

~ ways to engage with words

vocabulary basic instructional routine
Vocabulary Basic Instructional Routine

1. Introduce the word

  • Pronunciation, spelling, syllabication

2. Introduce the meaning

  • Student-friendly explanation
  • Word part analysis
  • Critical attribute identification

3. Illustrate the word with examples and non-examples

4. Check understanding

  • Distinguish between examples & non-examples
  • Generate examples
  • Answer questions

(Archer & Hughes, 2011, p. 75; see video examples by Anita Archer, http://explicitinstruction.org/)

building academic vocabulary a six step process
Building Academic VocabularyA Six-Step Process
  • Learning new words representing known or unknown concepts

Introduce word

Students generalize meaning

Students create nonlinguistic representation

Massed Practice

initial word learning

Engage students in word activities

Discuss words

Engage student “play” with words

Distributive Practice

all previous words

(Marzano, 2004)

how might i introduce different kinds of terms most effectively2

How might I introduce different kinds of terms most effectively?

~ 3 essentials

~ ways to engage with words

experience observe
Experience & Observe
  • Strategy observer
    • What steps/processes did you observe?
  • Participant observer
    • What words, behaviors, evidence of student learning did you notice?
  • Participants
    • What did you learn? What worked for you? How did you feel as a learner using this strategy?
elementary example
Elementary Example
  • April Kelley, ESU 6
  • “reluctant”
  • http://voicethread.com/?#q.b1800817.i9462303
please answer
Please answer:
  • Yes or No: “Staycation” is a neologism.
  • Rate your understanding of the word neologism.
neologism
neologism
  • neo (Gk, new)
  • logos (Gk, word)
  • -ism (noun, distinctive condition, doctrine, system, theory)

Critical Attributes

  • recently coined (first used)
  • not yet accepted as mainstream
neologis m
neologism
  • Yes – No – Why?: “Staycation” is a neologism
  • Rate your understanding of the word neologism.
experience observe1
Experience & Observe
  • Strategy observer
    • What steps/processes did you observe?
  • Participant observer
    • What words, behaviors, evidence of student learning did you notice?
  • Participants
    • What did you learn? What worked for you? How did you feel as a learner using this strategy?
introducing specific words three essentials
Introducing Specific WordsThree Essentials

IMPORTANT!

  • Student Friendly Explanations
    • Characterize word and typical use
    • Explain meaning in everyday language
    • Emphasize critical attributes
    • Explore morphemesand cognates
  • Teacher-Created Contexts
    • Develop instructional contexts that provide strong clues to meaning
    • Provide examples and non-examples
  • Active Engagement with Words
    • Short, lively opportunities for students to interact with words and meanings right away and over time with feedback

(Archer & Hughes, Explicit Instruction, 2011; others!)

1 student friendly explanations
1. Student Friendly Explanations
  • Consider resist
    • Dictionary: “to withstand the force or the effect of”
    • Student-friendly: “when a person struggles or fights not to give in to something”
  • Write a student-friendly explanation for one word you teach.
2 teacher created contexts
2. Teacher-Created Contexts
  • Consider convey
    • Literary Context: “Of the Right Whale, the best outline pictures are in Scoresby; but they are drawn on too small a scale to convey a desirable impression” (Melville, Moby Dick).
    • Teacher Created: The speaker was successful in conveying his message to the audience. They allheardwhat he said, and understood his ideas.
    • Though she can’t talk much, Lily quite clearly conveyed her want for her sippy cup by shouting “bup” and pointing at the cup on the table.
  • Write a few sentences using your word in context to clarify meaning.
3 active engagement with words identify example non examples
3. Active Engagement with WordsIdentify Example & Non-Examples
  • Consider interior(as the central area of a region—the area that is away from the coast, state line, or border)
3 active engagement with words identify example non examples1
3. Active Engagement with WordsIdentify Example & Non-Examples
  • Newport, OR
  • Summer Lake, OR
  • Ontario Municipal Airport, OR
  • Umatilla National Forest, OR
3 active engagement with words identify example non examples2
3. Active Engagement with WordsIdentify Example & Non-Examples

leisurely or in a hurry?

  • Taking a walk in the park
  • Firefighters getting to a fire
  • Runners in a race
  • Sitting and talking to friends
  • A dog lying in the sun

T-P-S: Think of more situations that sound leisurely.

3 active engagement with words identify example non examples3
3. Active Engagement with WordsIdentify Example & Non-Examples

glimpse scrutinize

  • Which can you do more quickly?

inspector spectator

  • What would you probably call every person watching a football game?

largo ritardando

  • Which tells me to slow down gradually?

crater caldera

  • Regarding volcanoes, which is generally larger?
3 active engagement with words generate example non examples
3. Active Engagement with WordsGenerate Example & Non-Examples
  • Activate Student Knowledge
    • Jake thought it would be fun to explore the interiorof Alaska. Why might you want to spend time in the interiorof Nebraska?
  • Sentence Stems
    • After a trip to the coast, we traveled to the interior of the country because _____.
  • Non-Linguistic Representation
    • Draw (or act, demonstrate, etc.) interior. Be ready to explain how this represents the critical attributes of the word.
research on imagery as elaboration
Research on Imagery as Elaboration

Students who used imagery to learn vocabulary, on average, performed…

# of studies

(Pickering, 2007, ASCD presentation)

3 active engagement with words answer questions
3. Active Engagement with WordsAnswer Questions

Connect with Student Knowledge

  • Why might someone want to spend time in the interior of Nebraska?
  • Can you describe a place you know about that is located in the interior of Nebraska?
  • What are the differences between how we use interior when discussing a state, country, or region and when discussing a room or an object?
3 active engagement with words answer questions1
3. Active Engagement with WordsAnswer Questions

Consider Relationship to Previously Taught Words

  • Would you suppress a profound thought?
  • Would blurting out your thought be an example of indecorum?
  • Could a seismogramindicate an impending tsunami?
introducing specific words three essentials1
Introducing Specific WordsThree Essentials

IMPORTANT!

  • Student Friendly Explanations
    • Characterize word and typical use
    • Explain meaning in everyday language
    • Emphasize critical attributes
    • Explore morphemesand cognates
  • Teacher-Created Contexts
    • Develop instructional contexts that provide strong clues to meaning
    • Provide examples and non-examples
  • Active Engagement with Words
    • Short, lively opportunities for students to interact with words and meanings right away and over time with feedback

(Archer & Hughes, Explicit Instruction, 2011; others!)

reception check
Reception Check

Full Bars…Decent Reception…Dropped Call?

reflect apply
Reflect & Apply
  • How does this fit with my previous vocabulary introductions?
    • Do I use the three essentials?
    • What should I remember and apply?
  • Can I supplement my current materials?
    • student-friendly definitions
    • sufficient, clear examples and non-examples (visual, auditory, kinesthetic)
    • sufficient, effective interaction with words right away and over time
two stars and a wish
Two Stars and a Wish

Please share two of the most important or relevant ideas you heard.

Please record something you wish:

  • a question or a comment about something you heard
  • something you need to know to understand better
  • a resource you would like posted
  • something to help make the session more engaging, relevant, accurate