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Rubric Assessment of Student Responses to an Information Literacy Tutorial. Megan Oakleaf Librarian for Instruction & Undergraduate Research Steve McCann NCSU Libraries Fellow. Share our experiences. In changing the way we assess our program In adapting ACRL outcomes to our project

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rubric assessment of student responses to an information literacy tutorial

Rubric Assessment of Student Responses to an Information Literacy Tutorial

Megan Oakleaf

Librarian for Instruction & Undergraduate Research

Steve McCann

NCSU Libraries Fellow

presentation objectives
Share our experiences.

In changing the way we assess our program

In adapting ACRL outcomes to our project

In selecting a learning artifact to assess

In piloting our assessment plan

Facilitate your experience with this

type of assessment.

Provide “take away” ideas.

Presentation Objectives
information literacy
Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to "recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information."

Association of College and Research Libraries http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards /informationliteracycompetency.htm

Information Literacy
the decision to change
Goal: To assess student learning of information literacy skills using outcomes-based assessment.

Need 2 things…

An Artifact to Assess

Outcomes to Measure

The Decision to Change
what artifact will we assess
Interactions with students that could yield assessment artifacts…

50-minute one-shot workshops

Library Online Basic Orientation (LOBO)

What artifact will we assess?
disadvantages of using workshops for assessment
Perceived lack of time for open-ended responses, only m.choice and T/F are options.

Taught by numerous librarians who lack assessment knowledge.

Inconsistent audiences & content.

Incomplete spectrum of outcomes addressed.

Disadvantages of Using Workshops for Assessment
advantages of using lobo for assessment
Forms basis for IL instruction at NCSU.

Reaches virtually all incoming freshmen.

Recently redesigned, includes open-ended questions.

Captures student responses in a searchable database.

Potential for rich data.

Advantages of Using LOBO for Assessment
what outcomes will we assess
Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

5 Standards

22 Performance Indicators

87 Outcomes

What outcomes will we assess?
what outcomes will we assess1
Objectives for Information Literacy Instruction: A Model Statement for Academic Librarians

Standards = 5

Perform. Indicators = 14

Outcomes = 35

“Bullets” = 133

What outcomes will we assess?
first steps
Set up DB to access student answers.

Match outcomes to questions.

How will we know the outcome’s been met?

Beginning, Developing, Exemplary

Pilot test a section of LOBO.

First Steps
the pilot test
Problem: Students use web sources for academic purposes without evaluating their quality.

Are they duped by low-quality sites?

Can we teach them to be more

critical consumers of information?

The Pilot Test
evaluating web sites
What criteria are you looking for?

What clues can you find?

What specific example can you give from the web site at hand?

Is the web site a good one for

you to use?

Evaluating Web Sites
lobo data jan april 04
1,830 total accounts new accounts

46% of total questions answered

Evaluated 50 accounts

Lobo Data—Jan-April, ‘04
objective 5 evaluating resources
#3 “Evaluate Web Sites” questions:

Locate a website

Evaluate website’s authority

Evaluate recency/currency

Identify Bias/Point of View

Objective 5: Evaluating Resources
q1 locate a website
4 points possible: Average score 2.7Q1: Locate a Website

Question Text: “Type the title and URL (web address) of the web site you will evaluate here:”

q2 evaluate a website s authority
8 points possible: Average score 5.0Q2: Evaluate a Website’s Authority

Question Text: “Answer the questions above for the web site you're evaluating. Overall, does what you know about the URL of the web site indicate that it's a good resource? ”

“Answer the questions above for the web site you're evaluating. Overall, does what you know about the authorship of the web site indicate that it's a good resource? ”

q3 evaluate a website s currency
8 points possible: Average score 5.6Q3: Evaluate a Website’s Currency

Question Text: “Answer the questions above for the web site you're evaluating. Overall, does what you know about the currency of the web site indicate that it's a good resource? ”

q4 identify a website s bias
8 points possible: Average score 4.1Q4: Identify a Website’s Bias

Question Text: “Answer the questions above for the web site you're evaluating. Overall, does what you know about the bias of the web site indicate that it's a good resource? Overall, is this web site a good resource to use for your assignment?”

pilot test findings
Students proven successful with mechanical tasks like checking currency and identifying URLs.

Students are shown as “developing” with judgment tasks such as authority and bias.

Bias is a potential target area.

Pilot Test Findings
how are we using our assessment results
Changes to LOBO

Add and Reorganize Content

Improve Question Format

Enlarge Response Space

Make Rubrics Available?

Train Course Instructors

How are we using our assessment results?
slide36

Changes to LOBO

Changes Coming Soon!

Add Viewlet to Model Application of Content

Replace Questions with Content

  • Answer these questions about the web site you’re evaluating in the space below:
  • Who created the site? What point of view do they represent?
  • What organizations support the site? What biases might they have?
  • Are links included that point to other viewpoints?
  • Are there signs of bias included in the site?
  • Are you biased toward the site?
  • Overall, does what you know about the bias of the web site indicate that it’s a good resource?

Fix Questions,

Add Links,

Enlarge Answer Space

Sample Student Answers

Get Help with Your Answer

slide37

Changes for Instructors

Share Rubrics,

Continue Ongoing Training,

Add Lesson Plans

how are we using our assessment results1
Changes to the Instruction Program

Including assessment in departmental 3-yr goals

Sharing data with “subject-specialist” librarians

Initiating rubric assessment of advanced instruction

Reporting results to library administration

and colleagues on other campuses

How are we using our assessment results?
key learning
Rubrics require lots of revision!

Rubrics are effective in measuring higher-level thinking skills.

Rubrics provide information administrators can use for reporting

and instructors can use to improve

teaching and learning.

Our colleagues are interested in

our progress. 

Key Learning
take aways
Can higher-level thinking skills like information literacy or critical thinking be adequately described in a rubric?

Are rubrics good tools for assessing student responses to tutorials?

What problems did you find in your practice with these rubrics?

What part of this process/project could be applied at your institution?

Take Aways
contact information
Megan Oakleaf

Librarian for Instruction & Undergraduate Research

919-513-0302

megan_oakleaf@ncsu.edu

Steve McCann

NCSU Libraries Fellow

919-513-7080

steve_mccann@ncsu.edu

Contact Information
rubric assessment of student responses to an information literacy tutorial1

Rubric Assessment of Student Responses to an Information Literacy Tutorial

Megan Oakleaf

Librarian for Instruction & Undergraduate Research

Steve McCann

NCSU Libraries Fellow