compensatory arm reaching strategies after stroke induced position analysis n.
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  1. Compensatory arm reaching strategies after stroke: Induced position analysis Wei Liu, PhD; Sandy McCombe Waller, PT, PhD; Thomas M. Kepple, MS; Jill Whitall, PhD

  2. Aim • Determine arm-movement control strategies in stroke for unilateral and bilateral tasks. • Explore how those strategies relate to residual impairment levels and functional improvements after specific bilateral arm-training intervention. • Relevance • After stroke, upper-limb movement patterns during arm reaching change to accommodate altered constraints, but these compensatory strategies do not map 1-to-1 with posttraining outcomes.

  3. Method • 12 individuals with chronic stroke were measured while reaching toward a box. • Other measures included: • Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity Assessment (FM). • Modified Wolf Motor Function Test (WT). • University of Maryland Arm Questionnaire for Stroke (UMAQS).

  4. Results • Some arm control strategies did not differ between unilateral and bilateral tasks but did differ by FM impairment level and predicted gains in WT but not UMAQS. • Increased shoulder relative to elbow moment contribution was associated with: • Less impairment. • Greater gains of speed in functional tasks.

  5. Conclusion • One goal of training to achieve better outcomes may be to decrease abnormal coupling of shoulder and elbow.