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NSF Directorate for Engineering | Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems ( CBET ) Transport and Thermal Fluids Cluster Particulate and Multiphase Processes ( PMP ) Program Director - Marc Ingber - mingber @ nsf.gov. Research Focus and Examples

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NSF Directorate for Engineering | Division of

Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET)

Transport and Thermal Fluids Cluster

Particulate and

Multiphase Processes (PMP)

Program Director - Marc Ingber - mingber@nsf.gov

Research Focus and Examples

Current Research Focus

Typical PMP Projects

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Current Research FocusFundamental research on transport phenomena in dispersed and microstructured systems

MULTIPHASE FLOW PHENOMENA & MICROSTRUCTURED FLUIDS(20%)

Bubble/droplet dynamics; emulsions; particle-laden flows; multiphase flows in

microfluidic devices; colloids, self and directed assembly; materials processing

PARTICLE TECHNOLOGY(25%)

Production of particles with engineered characteristics, unique composition, and

surface properties; particle assembly into functional structures, sensors, and

devices; particle tagging

GRANULAR SYSTEMS(25%)

Separation processes; force chains; modeling, DEM simulations; lubrication;

powder flows; effects of cohesion; pharmaceutical and neutraceutical processing

ENVIRONMENTAL(10%)

Processes leading to new technologies for environmental sustainability; sediment

transport; avalanches; plumes; viscous resuspension; fate and transport of

nanoparticles

MULTIPHASE TRANSPORT IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS(20%)

Multiphase transport in biological systems with applications to clinical diagnostics

and therapeutics; lab-on-a-chip; drug delivery; drug discovery

The following slides depict some typical PMP research efforts

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self assembled biomimetic antireflection coatings for solar cells and collectors
Self Assembled Biomimetic Antireflection Coatings For Solar Cells and Collectors

Novel templating nanofabrication platform

Mimics antireflective moth eyes

Mimics superhydrophobic cicada

Spin-coated colloidal crystals with

remarkably large domain sizes and

unusual nonclose-packed structures

Peng Jiang - University of Florida

Figure:

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Dynamics of Microbubbles in the Human Circulation: Effects of Flow Pulsatility

and Ultrasound Radation

Alberto Aliseda - University of Washington

Methodology can also be used to treat tumors and prevent strokes

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Exploring the Fundamentals and

Applications of Pickering Emulsions

Lenore Dai - Arizona State University

SEM Images with X-ray Microanalysis

 Background

 In contrast to conventional emulsions using surfactants

as stabilizers, Pickering emulsions use solid particles.

Provide a novel method to synthesize core-shell latexes

through one-step Pickering emulsion polymerization.

Results

Successfully synthesized silica-polystryrene composite

latexes using Pickering emulsions as a template.

Inclusion of nanoparticles has a strong effect on the

size distribution of the composite-latexes.

Additional surfactants either inhibit nanoparticle

interfacial assembly or even latex formation.

Impact

Novel and simple methods to synthesize functional

particulates.

 Unique class of materials that have wide potential

applications.

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formation of multiscale biopolymer particle structures for novel biosorbent design
Formation of Multiscale Biopolymer Particle Structures for Novel Biosorbent Design

Nina Schapley - Rutgers University

The following specific aims support the Project Goal:

Synthesizing biopolimer microbeads coated with

complementary biopolymer nanoparticles and

characterizing equilibrium heavy metal ion uptake

by the combined structures.

Understanding mechanisms of particle size separation

in a bimodal suspension flowing through expansion,

contraction and bifurcation geometries, affecting the

arrangement of microparticles when a fixed bed is

formed. (See Figure 1.)

Quantifying the kinetics of metal ion adsorption in flow

through a fixed bed of biopolymer micro-nanoparticle

structures, and hence gaining insight into the dominant

mass transfer processes.

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magnetically and thermally active nanoparticles for cancer treatment
Magnetically and Thermally Active Nanoparticles for Cancer Treatment

Magnetite nanoparticles

Carlos Rinaldi - University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

  • Potential Advantages of Nanoparticles
  • Targeted energy delivery at the nanoscale

Uniform hyperthermia at the tumor site

  • Fe3O4 nanoparticles are bio-compatible

Inject and forget treatment

  • Particle size 10-100 nm

Injectable

High circulation lifetime

Permeable through tumor leaky vasculature

  • Controllable surface charge (-5mV to +5mV)

Minimize phagocytosis

Avoid non-specific interactions with

blood and tissues

Avoid aggregation

Functionalized nanoparticles may target

specific cell types (cancerous vs. healthy)

Minimize damage to surrounding healthytissue

~ 46° C

37° C

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CAREER: Molecularly Directed Assembly

of “Patchy” Particles

Ilona Kretzschmar - The City College of New York

a)

Q = 2º

d)

b)

c)

e)

  • Background: Molecularly Directed Assembly
  • development of site-specific particle surface modification methods
  • “patchy” particles for molecularly directed assembly

guidelines for binding energies, particle concentrations, and patch sizes

  • Results: Glancing Angle Metal Evaporation
  • patch sizes as small as 3.7% of surface
  • uses shadow effect of particles within layer

patches of different geometry obtainable

  • Impact:
  • simple and reproducible method for patch
  • generation
  • geometry predicted by mathematical model
  • minimum patch size - important input
  • parameter for MD simulations
  • Figure Caption:
  • a)cross sectional view of evaporation set up (Q = 2º)
  • b) experimental patches
  • c) computational prediction of patch
  • d) particles responsible for patch formation
  • e) view of patch from source position

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