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PORTABLE TRAFFIC MONITORING SITE INSTALLATION AND INSPECTION TRAINING. PRESENTED BY: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND SOUTHERN TRAFFIC SERVICES RUBIE FRASE & TERRY ROBINSON. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING.

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PORTABLE TRAFFIC MONITORING SITE INSTALLATION AND INSPECTION TRAINING


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    1. PORTABLE TRAFFIC MONITORING SITE INSTALLATION AND INSPECTION TRAINING PRESENTED BY: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND SOUTHERN TRAFFIC SERVICES RUBIE FRASE & TERRY ROBINSON

    2. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING • The State Road Department started collecting traffic data at ten locations back in 1936. As the state grew both in population and number of lane miles, the need to expand traffic data collection was obvious.

    3. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING • The value of good traffic data became apparent early on in the evolution of the national Department of Transportation (DOT) and eventually the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).

    4. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING • This data is translated into revenue allocations for the state and federal highway programs.

    5. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING Good data is a result of good site installations. Good count/speed/vehicle classification and weight data is essential to the following customers: Some Internal Uses: • Roadway Design uses our data to determine if facility enhancements/lane additions are needed; • Pavement Design uses our data to determine pavement type & thickness requirements; • Traffic Operations/Maint. Use it to determine lane closure restrictions. And there are many others.

    6. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING Data uses (cont.) Some External Uses: • The FHWA compiles data for use in national trend reports, national Truck Weight Study and other studies and for apportioning funds back to us; • Advertisers and developers that need to know how many motorists are passing a given location in order to set sign and rates or determine potential demand for retail outlets, etc. (among many others).

    7. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING • Two categories of traffic monitoring sites have permanent equipment physically located in the roadway. These are TTMS and PTMS. They are the backbone of the traffic count program administered by the FDOT Central and District Offices.

    8. THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA COLLECTING • The data collected at these sites may include: volume, speed, vehicle class and weight. The type of equipment installed and the programs set-up in the equipment determine how the site functions.

    9. TTMS

    10. TTMS TELEMETERED TRAFFIC MONITORING SITE • TTMS sites are the locations that are polled via modem daily by the TRANSTAT Central Office computers. They record and transmit every day of the year and provide the data used for adjusting short-term traffic counts to Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT). • TTMS sites are installed and maintained out of Central Office in Tallahassee. • Many have solar panels

    11. PTMS TYPE II BASE MOUNTED TYPE III PEDESTAL MOUNTED

    12. PTMS PORTABLE TRAFFIC MONITORING SITE • PTMS locations are usually installed on high volume urban arterials where rubber hose counts or other equipment is difficult to install and maintain.

    13. PTMS Piezo Loop • The permanent part of the installation is the cabinet and loop/piezo wires installed in the pavement. Greater reliability, personnel safety, and accuracy are the reason loops and piezos are preferred to hose counts.

    14. PTMS LOOP PIEZO • Loops provide a volume count of vehicles crossing the loop sensors. The piezos provide classification count which measures the axles as the vehicle crosses the piezo.

    15. PTMS • To gather data, a traffic counter is normally placed in the cabinet and attached to the wire harness for a short period (2 – 7 days) either annually or quarterly, then moved from one site to another, hence the term portable traffic monitoring site.

    16. PTMS ADR-1000 COUNTER IN CABINET

    17. HISTORY OF ISSUES Issue – PTMS Inspections Not Passing • Resolution – Train DOT, Construction, Contract and Sub-contract employees on how to install a PTMS site.

    18. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Above all, the need to follow Design Standards and Plan Specifications. • Design standards are reviewed every year and changes made as needed. You need to keep a copy of the latest standards with you at all times. • The following slide reflects a major change to loops.

    19. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Square Corners

    20. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Above all, the need to follow Design Standards and Plan Specifications. • Review the plans and follow the placement, materials to be used and location precisely. • For Example: Loops are no longer to be cut at a 45° angle. Since the year 2001 the standard is to drill corners with a 1.5” bit by 2” minimum depth.

    21. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Above all, the need to follow Design Standards and Plan Specifications. • Loops SHOULD NOT be cut across the concrete joint in the roadway. As the vehicles travel across the pavement, the pavement jars and could loosen the loop wires and render them useless.

    22. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS

    23. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Above all, the need to follow Design Standards and Plan Specifications. • Piezos come with a warranty card. The warranty card must be filled out and a copy of it placed in the cabinet along with a copy of the cabinet schematics.

    24. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS

    25. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Above all, the need to follow Design Standards and Plan Specifications. The difference between a good and bad site! Good Bad

    26. OBJECTIVE FOR THIS CLASS Above all, the need to follow Design Standards and Plan Specifications. • Every time a site does not pass on the first inspection is wasted tax payer’s money. This affects all of us including you.

    27. GOING FORWARD • The plans are delivered to the Data Collection Manager, and they review them for proper location, design and placement.

    28. GOING FORWARD

    29. GOING FORWARD • The Data Collection Manager shall be contacted by the contractor and/or sub-contractor prior to any installation. This includes the cabinet, loops and piezos.

    30. GOING FORWARD • The Data Collection Manager shall be contacted when the site has been installed and ready for inspection. • In most cases, there is a bonus tied to the project. If the site does not pass….your company may lose or be the cause of any bonus not being paid.

    31. GOING FORWARD • In your travels throughout the district, if you find a damaged site, please do the following: • Take a picture of the damage. • Call Road Rangers or local police if the site was involved in an accident. • Contact the Data Collection Manager immediately. • In most cases, if the damage was caused by an accident, we can recoup the cost of repair from the at-fault insurance company.

    32. CONTACT INFORMATION RUBIE FRASE – I am the main contact person for District 5 • 386-943-5380 – Office • 386-847-4289 - Cell • Rubie.frase@dot.state.fl.us

    33. TECHNICAL PRESENTATION Presented by Terry Robinson – Southern Traffic Services

    34. PRE-ENGINEERING Planning Materials Action

    35. PRE-ENGINEERING PLANNING • Sites are selected by the Data Collection and Planning Office in most scenarios. • Sites are approved by the District Engineers. • Plans are developed by the Office of Design and reviewed by the Data Collection Office.

    36. PRE-ENGINEERING • PTMS sites are independent of one another, and sites are built to fit the location. • Numerous departments are involved with the building of a PTMS site. Statistics office, Planning office, Data office, Design office, Engineering office, Construction division, etc.

    37. PRE-ENGINEERING • Utility locates are completed • Pavement is cured and ready for sensors • All equipment is on hand and meets Approved Product List (APL) and Qualified Product List (QPL)

    38. PRE-ENGINEERING • Engineers have approved ALL Plans and changes • Schedules have been approved by: Project Manager, Project Engineer, Traffic Operations Engineer, Consultant • Maintenance of Traffic Plan submitted and Approved.

    39. WHAT ARE THE COMPONENTS OF A PTMS SITE? MATERIALS • Cabinet – Type III, IV, and V • Piezoelectric sensors • Inductive Loop sensors • Pull boxes • Grounding electrodes • Surge Protection • Conduit

    40. MATERIALS • Is cabinet in place? • Does cabinet face the right direction? • Does cabinet meet plans and specifications? • Pull boxes in place and installed to specifications? • All conduits in place? • Have piezo sensors been tested prior to installation

    41. MATERIALS • Do loop wires and cables meet QPL? • Are epoxies and sealants approved? • Are dates on piezos, sealants and epoxies recorded?

    42. ACTION Areas of Concern • Maintenance of Traffic (MOT) • Review of MOT Plan • Placement of Temporary Traffic Control Devices • Any ADDITIONAL SIGNS REQUIRED? • District or Area Public Information Office Contacted?

    43. ACTION • Verify all Public Safety and Local Governments are aware of Lane Closures • Update Traffic Operations if changes are made to MOT Plan • Notify ALL parties that all lanes are open upon completion

    44. BREAK TIME

    45. INDUCTIVE LOOP ASSEMBLIES • Inductive loops are simply a coil of wire embedded in the road’s surface. • The loops that are installed in the State of Florida and used by the FDOT are usually 6’ X 6’ loops using 12 gauge wire consisting of 4 turns. • 2 loops are installed in each lane that work in conjunction with the Piezoelectric Sensors.

    46. INDUCTIVE LOOP ASSEMBLIES • What is an inductor? • An inductor is simply a coil of wire or an electromagnet. • The inductor or wire has a very low resistance. When a vehicle passes over the loop, the inductance is elevated. This unit of increase is measured in “Henry’s”, or microhenries. The vehicle becomes the “inductor” or the coil.

    47. LAYOUT OF SENSORS • Verify the space of the sensors • Standard spacing is 16 feet from leading edge of leading loop to leading edge of trailing loop • Loops MUST be in CENTER of lane and MUST NOT cross expansion joints unless approved by Engineer prior to installations

    48. LAYOUT OF SENSORS • Standard loops are 6 foot by 6 foot, 4 turns on each loop • Loops cut in asphalt SHALL be cut to a depth of 3 inches or deeper • Loops cut in concrete SHALL be cut 2.5 inches or deeper • Piezo Sensors shall be placed on one side of the lane and NOT placed in the middle of the lane

    49. LAYOUT OF SENSORS PIEZO LOOP

    50. LOOPS & LOOP INSTALLATIONS • Loops shall be installed as per FDOT Standards and Specifications • FDOT District 5 Standards REQUIRE that LOOPS ARE NOT TO BE SPLICED • Loop wires are to be checked prior to installation • Loops are to be placed in the BOTTOM of the slots