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Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBL): Lessons Learned – Part I. George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut Sep 15 2011 www.pbis.org www.scalingup.org www.cber.org. PURPOSE

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positive behavioral interventions supports pbl lessons learned part i

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBL): Lessons Learned – Part I

George Sugai

OSEP Center on PBIS

Center for Behavioral Education & Research

University of Connecticut

Sep 15 2011

www.pbis.orgwww.scalingup.orgwww.cber.org

slide2

PURPOSE

Examination of lessons learned from 15 years of PBIS (PBL) implementation

  • Keynote overview: All
  • Follow-up: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators
  • Coaching: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators
slide4

8 Big Lessons

(9 data pt 2)

swpbs logic
SWPBS Logic!

Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, durable, scalable, & logical for all students

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)

teaching academics behaviors

DEFINE

Simply

ADJUST for

Efficiency

MONITOR &

ACKNOWLEDGE

Continuously

MODEL

PRACTICE

In Setting

57

Teaching Academics & Behaviors
slide13

2. NATURAL CONTEXT

1. SOCIAL SKILL

Expectations

3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES

slide16

Integrated

Elements

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

OUTCOMES

15

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior

general implementation process getting started

Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

slide20

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL &

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

FEW

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

SOME

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

23

ALL

~80% of Students

slide21

23

Continuum of Support for ALL

Few

Some

All

Dec 7, 2007

slide22

Continuum of Support for ALL

“Theora”

Math

Science

Spanish

Reading

Soc skills

Soc Studies

Basketball

Label behavior…not people

Dec 7, 2007

slide23

Continuum of Support for ALL:

“Molcom”

Anger man.

Prob Sol.

Ind. play

Adult rel.

Self-assess

Attend.

Coop play

Peer interac

Label behavior…not people

Dec 7, 2007

slide25

Maximum Student Benefits

Fixsen & Blase, 2009

slide26

Start

w/

What Works

Focus on Fidelity

Detrich, Keyworth, & States (2007). J. Evid.-based Prac. in Sch.

slide29

Behaviorism

Laws of Behavior

SWPBS Conceptual Foundations

ABA

Applied Behavioral Technology

PBS

Social Validity

SWPBS

All Students

rct group design pbis studies
RCT & Group Design PBIS Studies
  • Reduced major disciplinary infractions
  • Improvements in academic achievement
  • Enhanced perception of organizational health & safety
  • Improved school climate
  • Reductions in teacher reported bullying behavior

Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Thornton, L.A., & Leaf, P.J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), 100-115

Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Bevans, K.B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), 462-473.

Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, 133-148.

Bradshaw, C.P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K.B., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, 1-26.

Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, 133-145.

Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), 1-14.

academic behavior connection
Academic-Behavior Connection

“Viewed as outcomes, achievement and behavior are related; viewed as causes of each other, achievement and behavior are unrelated. In this context, teaching behavior as relentlessly as we teach reading or other academic content is the ultimate act of prevention, promise, and power underlying PBS and other preventive interventions in America’s schools.”

Algozzine, Wang, & Violette (2011), p. 16.

Algozzine, B., Wang, C., & Violette, A. S. (2011). Reexamining the relationship between academic achievement and social behavior. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 13, 3-16.

Burke, M. D., Hagan-Burke, S., & Sugai, G. (2003). The efficacy of function-based interventions for students with learning disabilities who exhibit escape-maintained problem behavior: Preliminary results from a single case study. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 26, 15-25.

McIntosh, K., Chard, D. J., Boland, J. B., & Horner, R. H. (2006). Demonstration of combined efforts in school-wide academic and behavioral systems and incidence of reading and behavior challenges in early elementary grades. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 8, 146-154.

McIntosh, K., Horner, R. H., Chard, D. J., Dickey, C. R., and Braun, D. H. (2008). Reading skills and function of problem behavior in typical school settings. Journal of Special Education, 42, 131-147.

Nelson, J. R., Johnson, A., & Marchand-Martella, N. (1996). Effects of direct instruction, cooperative learning, and independent learning practices on the classroom behavior of students with behavioral disorders: A comparative analysis. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 4, 53-62.

Wang, C., & Algozzine, B. (2011). Rethinking the relationship between reading and behavior in early elementary school. Journal of Educational Research, 104, 100-109.

slide34

Sample Teaming Matrix

Are outcomes measurable?

slide35

17

SWPBS

Practices

School-wide

Classroom

  • Smallest #
  • Evidence-based
  • Biggest, durable effect

Family

Non-classroom

Student &

Family

slide37

ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS

  • TERTIARY PREVENTION
  • Function-based support
  • Wraparound
  • Person-centered planning
  • TERTIARY PREVENTION

~5%

~15%

  • SECONDARY PREVENTION
  • Check in/out
  • Targeted social skills instruction
  • Peer-based supports
  • Social skills club
  • SECONDARY PREVENTION
  • PRIMARY PREVENTION
  • Teach SW expectations
  • Proactive SW discipline
  • Positive reinforcement
  • Effective instruction
  • Parent engagement
  • PRIMARY PREVENTION

~80% of Students

positive behavioral interventions supports pbl lessons learned part ii

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBL): Lessons Learned - Part II

George Sugai

OSEP Center on PBIS

Center for Behavioral Education & Research

University of Connecticut

Sep 15 2011

www.pbis.orgwww.scalingup.orgwww.cber.org

slide43

FROM

Decrease in suspensions at Dubbo

TO

Triangle data at Glenroi Heights

FROM

Parent Letter at Buninyong

TO

Good New Postcard at Orange East

FROM

Yindyamarra, Bilingarra, Yawandyilinya at Parkes

TO

Casual Teacher Portfolio at Dubbo

FROM

PBL in Classroom at Delroy

TO

Playground Observations at Middletown

PBL in

Western NSW

slide44

Translate for staff.

  • Give kid-examples for staff.
  • Recommend teacher to Executive.
  • Support a peer.
  • “How am I doing?”“How’s this look?

!!!

upcoming events
Upcoming Events

www.pbis.org/network

slide47

PURPOSE

Supporting & extending data

  • Keynote overview: All
  • Follow-up: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators
  • Coaching: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators
swpbs logic1

Keys to Success

SWPBS Logic!

Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, durable, scalable, & logical for all students

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)

slide50

23

Classroom Implementation

Behavior Continuum

Academic Continuum

PBL

Integrated Continuum

Mar 10 2010

slide51

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

Leadership

OUTCOMES

15

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior

measuring workplace strength simplified to 12 questions buckingham coffman 2002 gallup
Measuring workplace strength simplified to 12 questions Buckingham & Coffman 2002, Gallup

High School & Successful Organizations

  • Do I know what is expected of me at work?
  • Do I have materials & equipment to do my work right?
  • At work, do I have opportunity to do what I do best every day?
  • In last 7 days, have I received recognition or praise for doing good work?
  • Does my supervisor, or someone at work, seem to care about me as person?
  • Is there someone at work who encourages my development?
  • At work, do my opinions seem to count?
  • Does mission/purpose of company make me feel my job is important?
  • Are my co-workers committed to doing quality work?
  • Do I have best friend at work?
  • In last 6 months, has someone at worked talked to me about myprogress?
  • This last year, have I had opportunities at work to learn & grow?

1 million workers, 80,000 managers, 400 companies

check in out pt card
Check In/Out Pt Card

Name________________ Date ________

Goal _____

Pts Possible _____

Pts Received_____

% of Pts _____

Goal Met? Y N

Rating Scale

2 = Great

1 = Ok

0 = Goal Not Met

slide58

Victim attention

  • Bystander attention
  • Self-delivered praise
  • Tangible access
slide59

PREVENTION

De-emphasize adding consequence for problem behavior

slide60

Target

Initiator

Context

or

Setting

Continuum of Behavior Fluency

Staff

Bystander

slide62

Doesn’t Work

Works

  • Label student
  • Exclude student
  • Blame family
  • Punish student
  • Assign restitution
  • Ask for apology
  • Teach targeted social skills
  • Reward social skills
  • Teach all
  • Individualize for non-responsive behavior
  • Invest in positive school-wide culture
slide63

MUST…..

  • Be easy & do-able by all
  • Be contextually relevant
  • Result in early disengagement
  • Increase predictability
  • Be pre-emptive
  • Be teachable
  • Be brief
slide64

www.pbis.org

“Stop, Walk, Talk”